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Discussione: aiuto tesi

  1. #1

    aiuto tesi

    Ciao a tutti.. devo iniziare una tesi sulla persuasione nell'ambito delle campagne di prevenzione dell'aids.. Qualcuno saprebbe indicarmi qualche testo o articolo da consultare.? Grazie sono completamente in crisi..

  2. #2
    Partecipante Esperto
    Data registrazione
    11-01-2007
    Residenza
    livorno beach
    Messaggi
    251

    Riferimento: aiuto tesi

    cosi a memoria e al volo mi viene in mente almeno per iniziare "Psicologia della salute" di Pietrantoni, un libro breve, ma dal quale puoi trovare molti spunti..sopratutto riguardo alla progettazione degli interventi ecc..

  3. #3

    Riferimento: aiuto tesi

    Grazie mille per il consiglio..
    Citazione Originalmente inviato da chiaretta1984 Visualizza messaggio
    cosi a memoria e al volo mi viene in mente almeno per iniziare "Psicologia della salute" di Pietrantoni, un libro breve, ma dal quale puoi trovare molti spunti..sopratutto riguardo alla progettazione degli interventi ecc..

  4. #4
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: aiuto tesi

    Beyond the most willing audiences: A meta-intervention to increase exposure to HIV-prevention programs by vulnerable populations. Albarracín, Dolores; Durantini, Marta R.; Earl, Allison; Gunnoe, Joanne B.; Leeper, Josh; Health Psychology, Vol 27(5), Sep 2008. pp. 638-644. [Journal Article] Abstract: Objective: Enrollment in HIV-prevention interventions is more likely when the audience has safer rather than riskier HIV-relevant behavior. Thus, a meta-intervention was designed to increase participation by an audience of infrequent condom users in Florida. Design: Participants (N = 400) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 conditions varying the introduction to a counseling program. In the experimental condition, participants were told that the intervention gave participants options but might not change their behavior. In a standard-introduction condition, participants were told that the program was highly effective at changing participants' behaviors. There was also an information-control group containing a description of the program, and a no-information-control group solely containing an invitation. Main outcome measures: The outcome measure was actual participation in the offered counseling. Results: Findings indicated that the experimental introduction was the most successful at yielding participation in the counseling program when the audience had low intentions to use condoms in the future. Conclusion: Intervention introductions countering participants' resistance to change increase participation in HIV-prevention counseling among reluctant clients. Other meta-interventions may be explored to systematically augment the effectiveness of evidence-based health-promotion interventions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

    COST SAVINGS THRESHOLD ANALYSIS OF A CAPACITY--BUILDING PROGRAM FOR HIV PREVENTION ORGANIZATIONS. By: Dauner, Kim Nichols; Oglesby, Willie H.; Richter, Donna L.; LaRose, Christopher M.; Holtgrave, David R.. AIDS Education & Prevention, Jun2008, Vol. 20 Issue 3, p265-274, 10p, 4 charts; Abstract: This article discusses the competition in the funding for the prevention of HIV in the United States. The article discusses the cost of HIV medical care and the costs of medical research and the development of research centers. Community-based organizations have been at the forefront of providing prevention programs for both HIV and AIDS. An economic analysis of the effectiveness of public health interventions is presented. It is evaluated just how many HIV patients would need to be averted in order to declare cost saving efforts. (AN 32739696)

    HIV interventions affect behavior indirectly: results from the AIDS Community Demonstration Projects. By: Yzer, Marco; Fishbein, Martin; Hennessy, Michael. AIDS Care, Apr2008, Vol. 20 Issue 4, p456-461, 6p, 2 charts, 2 graphs Abstract: Behavioral theory informs HIV prevention programs by identifying important predictors of the relevant behavior. Changes in those predictors brought about by program messages should theoretically translate into behavior change. Program evaluation, however, may examine only whether message exposure is associated with behavior change, assuming that if people changed their behavior, the intervention must have effectively changed the determinants. This practice obscures how intervention programs work in the field. We use data from the AIDS Community Demonstration Projects (ACDP) to illustrate this important idea. Earlier research found that the ACDP moved at-risk communities to more consistent condom use with both main and non-main partners. This study demonstrates that these behavioral effects are explained by the ACDP's ability to improve intention and self-efficacy for condom use with both main and non-main partners. We conclude that to understand how HIV prevention programs work, program evaluations need to assess how the intervention affected what it was designed to change: one or more critical behavioral determinants. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/09540120701867024 (AN 31899000)

    Methodology for Evaluating an Adaptation of Evidence-Based Drug Abuse Prevention in Alternative Schools. By: Hopson, Laura M.; Steiker, Lori K. H.. Children & Schools, Apr2008, Vol. 30 Issue 2, p116-127, 12p Abstract: The purpose of this article is to set forth an innovative methodological protocol for culturally grounding interventions with high-risk youths in alternative schools. This study used mixed methods to evaluate original and adapted versions of a culturally grounded substance abuse prevention program. The qualitative and quantitative methods concurrently explore behaviors around drugs and alcohol, contextual variables for youth substance abuse and related factors, cultural perspectives regarding drug-related attitudes and behaviors, and the complex reasons behind students' substance use choices. Although questionnaires were used to note demographics, cultural and acculturative variables, drug use, drug and alcohol attitudes and expectancies, and school culture variables, focus groups capture the voices of the students and staff and trends that cannot be fully understood through questionnaires. In this study, focus groups aid in the understanding of student drug and alcohol choices, attitudes, and behaviors and help the researchers hone in on questions and necessary changes to future research procedures. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 32010166)

    Adolescent sexual risk behaviors and school-based sexually transmitted infection/HIV prevention. By: Walcott, Christy M.; Meyers, Adena B.; Landau, Steven. Psychology in the Schools, Jan2008, Vol. 45 Issue 1, p39-51, 13p, 1 chart Abstract: Many adolescents are susceptible to negative outcomes associated with sexual behavior. This is particularly true for those who initiate sexual intercourse at an early age, have many sex partners, or engage in unprotected sex because these behaviors put one at risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV. This article reviews the various demographic, social-contextual, and intrapersonal factors linked to sexual risk behaviors. Successful STI/HIV prevention programs must consider developmental and gender issues, as well as cultural norms and values, to effectively meet the prevention needs of all adolescents. We discuss the characteristics of effective intervention programs and provide the names and key features of empirically validated, school-based STI/HIV prevention programs. In addition, we recommend specific roles for school psychologists in STI/HIV prevention efforts. Finally, other resources are provided to assist practitioners in their continuing review of STI/HIV prevention education. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/pits.20277 (AN 27968725)

    Se te ne servono altri manda un PM

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  5. #5
    Pietro Abelardo
    Ospite non registrato

    Riferimento: aiuto tesi

    Immagino che inizierei con una panoramica dei modelli motivazionali in psicologia della salute. Credo che tutti i manuali di psicologia della salute li riportino.

  6. #6

    Riferimento: aiuto tesi

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da willy61 Visualizza messaggio
    Beyond the most willing audiences: A meta-intervention to increase exposure to HIV-prevention programs by vulnerable populations. Albarracín, Dolores; Durantini, Marta R.; Earl, Allison; Gunnoe, Joanne B.; Leeper, Josh; Health Psychology, Vol 27(5), Sep 2008. pp. 638-644. [Journal Article] Abstract: Objective: Enrollment in HIV-prevention interventions is more likely when the audience has safer rather than riskier HIV-relevant behavior. Thus, a meta-intervention was designed to increase participation by an audience of infrequent condom users in Florida. Design: Participants (N = 400) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 conditions varying the introduction to a counseling program. In the experimental condition, participants were told that the intervention gave participants options but might not change their behavior. In a standard-introduction condition, participants were told that the program was highly effective at changing participants' behaviors. There was also an information-control group containing a description of the program, and a no-information-control group solely containing an invitation. Main outcome measures: The outcome measure was actual participation in the offered counseling. Results: Findings indicated that the experimental introduction was the most successful at yielding participation in the counseling program when the audience had low intentions to use condoms in the future. Conclusion: Intervention introductions countering participants' resistance to change increase participation in HIV-prevention counseling among reluctant clients. Other meta-interventions may be explored to systematically augment the effectiveness of evidence-based health-promotion interventions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

    COST SAVINGS THRESHOLD ANALYSIS OF A CAPACITY--BUILDING PROGRAM FOR HIV PREVENTION ORGANIZATIONS. By: Dauner, Kim Nichols; Oglesby, Willie H.; Richter, Donna L.; LaRose, Christopher M.; Holtgrave, David R.. AIDS Education & Prevention, Jun2008, Vol. 20 Issue 3, p265-274, 10p, 4 charts; Abstract: This article discusses the competition in the funding for the prevention of HIV in the United States. The article discusses the cost of HIV medical care and the costs of medical research and the development of research centers. Community-based organizations have been at the forefront of providing prevention programs for both HIV and AIDS. An economic analysis of the effectiveness of public health interventions is presented. It is evaluated just how many HIV patients would need to be averted in order to declare cost saving efforts. (AN 32739696)

    HIV interventions affect behavior indirectly: results from the AIDS Community Demonstration Projects. By: Yzer, Marco; Fishbein, Martin; Hennessy, Michael. AIDS Care, Apr2008, Vol. 20 Issue 4, p456-461, 6p, 2 charts, 2 graphs Abstract: Behavioral theory informs HIV prevention programs by identifying important predictors of the relevant behavior. Changes in those predictors brought about by program messages should theoretically translate into behavior change. Program evaluation, however, may examine only whether message exposure is associated with behavior change, assuming that if people changed their behavior, the intervention must have effectively changed the determinants. This practice obscures how intervention programs work in the field. We use data from the AIDS Community Demonstration Projects (ACDP) to illustrate this important idea. Earlier research found that the ACDP moved at-risk communities to more consistent condom use with both main and non-main partners. This study demonstrates that these behavioral effects are explained by the ACDP's ability to improve intention and self-efficacy for condom use with both main and non-main partners. We conclude that to understand how HIV prevention programs work, program evaluations need to assess how the intervention affected what it was designed to change: one or more critical behavioral determinants. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/09540120701867024 (AN 31899000)

    Methodology for Evaluating an Adaptation of Evidence-Based Drug Abuse Prevention in Alternative Schools. By: Hopson, Laura M.; Steiker, Lori K. H.. Children & Schools, Apr2008, Vol. 30 Issue 2, p116-127, 12p Abstract: The purpose of this article is to set forth an innovative methodological protocol for culturally grounding interventions with high-risk youths in alternative schools. This study used mixed methods to evaluate original and adapted versions of a culturally grounded substance abuse prevention program. The qualitative and quantitative methods concurrently explore behaviors around drugs and alcohol, contextual variables for youth substance abuse and related factors, cultural perspectives regarding drug-related attitudes and behaviors, and the complex reasons behind students' substance use choices. Although questionnaires were used to note demographics, cultural and acculturative variables, drug use, drug and alcohol attitudes and expectancies, and school culture variables, focus groups capture the voices of the students and staff and trends that cannot be fully understood through questionnaires. In this study, focus groups aid in the understanding of student drug and alcohol choices, attitudes, and behaviors and help the researchers hone in on questions and necessary changes to future research procedures. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 32010166)

    Adolescent sexual risk behaviors and school-based sexually transmitted infection/HIV prevention. By: Walcott, Christy M.; Meyers, Adena B.; Landau, Steven. Psychology in the Schools, Jan2008, Vol. 45 Issue 1, p39-51, 13p, 1 chart Abstract: Many adolescents are susceptible to negative outcomes associated with sexual behavior. This is particularly true for those who initiate sexual intercourse at an early age, have many sex partners, or engage in unprotected sex because these behaviors put one at risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV. This article reviews the various demographic, social-contextual, and intrapersonal factors linked to sexual risk behaviors. Successful STI/HIV prevention programs must consider developmental and gender issues, as well as cultural norms and values, to effectively meet the prevention needs of all adolescents. We discuss the characteristics of effective intervention programs and provide the names and key features of empirically validated, school-based STI/HIV prevention programs. In addition, we recommend specific roles for school psychologists in STI/HIV prevention efforts. Finally, other resources are provided to assist practitioners in their continuing review of STI/HIV prevention education. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/pits.20277 (AN 27968725)

    Se te ne servono altri manda un PM

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Grazie davvero tanto..!

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