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  1. #1
    Partecipante Veramente Figo L'avatar di Celeste
    Data registrazione
    05-06-2006
    Messaggi
    1,142

    tesi bulimia e attaccamento

    Salve a tutti!Scrivo qui sperando di trovare qualche aiuto e consiglio utile x la tesi!L'argomento della tesi dovrebbe riguardar principalmente la bulimia nella cornice dell'attaccamento...in particolare dovrei indagare nell'adolescenza, nei rapporti familiari e di coppia. Ora chi si è trovato a far delle ricerche in qsto campo sa qnt sia difficile trovare il materiale..xchè è un disturbo anche se conosciuto poco studiato!Mi è stato chiesto soprattutto di riuscir a trovare articoli recenti..ad ex uno psicologo iscritto all'albo può accedere a diversi siti in cui scaricare qsti articoli...ma io ovviam nn essendo ancora laureata nn ho qsto privilegio!Qualcuno ha del materiale o dei suggerimenti su cm muovermi?Please! Grazie di cuore!!!

  2. #2
    Partecipante Veramente Figo L'avatar di Celeste
    Data registrazione
    05-06-2006
    Messaggi
    1,142

    Riferimento: tesi bulimia e attaccamento

    ragazziiiiiiiii nessuno può darmi una mano?sn giorni che navigo su internet...ma gli articoli che trovo sn tutti a pagamento!potreste consigliarmi anche un manuale sui disturbi alimentari in cui vengono trattati in modo esauriente?please

  3. #3
    Neofita
    Data registrazione
    18-03-2009
    Residenza
    chieti
    Messaggi
    11

    Riferimento: tesi bulimia e attaccamento

    cara celeste sappi che ho il tuo stesso problema...io è da giorni che cerco ma ovviamente tutti i siti per gli articoli scientifici sono a pagamento
    speriamo bene e che quacuno ci aiuti

  4. #4
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: tesi bulimia e attaccamento

    Attachment styles, memories of parental rearing and therapeutic bond: a study with eating disordered patients, their parents and therapists. By: Tereno, Susana; Soares, Isabel; Martins, Carla; Celani, Mariana; Sampaio, Daniel. European Eating Disorders Review, Jan/Feb2008, Vol. 16 Issue 1, p49-58, 10p, 5 charts Abstract: Patients diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (n = 30) and bulimia nervosa (n = 27), their parents and therapists were recruited for this study aimed at examining differences between clinical groups and a control group (n = 35) in terms of attachment styles and perceptions of memories of parental rearing. Within the clinical groups, relations among these variables and therapeutic bond were explored. In addition, parents' and their daughters' attachment styles were compared. The results showed differences between clinical and control groups: the daughters in the control group reported lower levels of attachment anxiety compared to those of the clinical groups; their mothers exhibited higher security than mothers of anorectic patients and lower avoidance than mothers of bulimic patients. For the anorectic group, therapeutic bond was associated to higher father's emotional support and lower rejection; in the bulimic group, therapeutic bond was related to higher maternal emotional support and lower rejection as well as to lower paternal overprotection. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/erv.801 (AN 27968748)

    Adverse relationship processes: the attempts of women with Bulimia Nervosa symptoms to fit the perceived ideal of intimate partners. By: Schembri, Charlene; Evans, Lynette. European Eating Disorders Review, Jan/Feb2008, Vol. 16 Issue 1, p59-66, 8p, 3 charts Abstract: Objective This study drew together research on anxious attachment, self-silencing, self-consciousness during sexual activity and bulimic symptoms. Method A mixed community/university sample of 225 women aged 18–63 (M = 30.24, SD = 10.44) and involved in an intimate relationship completed questionnaires. Results Adverse relationship processes were significantly associated and each was also associated with bulimic symptoms. Self-consciousness during sexual activity was the best predictor of bulimic symptoms, followed by anxious attachment. Self-silencing was redundant when the other relationship processes were included in the regression. General psychopathology mediated the association between self-silencing and bulimic symptoms, and partially mediated associations between bulimic symptoms and both anxious attachment and self-consciousness during sexual activity. Discussion Women with bulimic symptoms attempt to change themselves by engaging in adverse processes in intimate relationships to meet the perceived expectations of their partners. Targeting these relationship processes in therapy might further add to the success of relationship-oriented treatments (e.g. Interpersonal Therapy). Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/erv.797 (AN 27968749)

    Eating disorders and attachment: the effects of hidden family processes on eating disorders. By: Ringer, Francoise; Crittenden, Patricia McKinsey. European Eating Disorders Review, Mar2007, Vol. 15 Issue 2, p119-130, 12p, 3 charts, 2 diagrams Abstract: Aim This study examined pattern of attachment in cohort of women with an eating disorder to determine what types of self-protective strategies they used, and further whether there was a specific relationship between strategy and diagnosis. Method The participants were 62 young women with an eating disorder (19 with anorexia nervosa, 26 with bulimia nervosa and 17 with bulimic anorexia). Attachment was assessed using the Adult attachment interview (AAI), classified using Crittenden's Dynamic-Maturational Method. Results The results indicated that all women with an eating disorder were anxiously attached. About half used an extreme coercive Type C strategy while most of the others combined coercion with an extreme dismissing Type A strategy. The content of the AAIs suggested lack of resolution of trauma or loss among the mothers and also of hidden family conflict between the parents. This in turn elicited extreme strategies for generating parent–child contingency from the daughters. Conclusions Central in almost all cases was the women's confusion regarding how parental behaviour was tied causally to their own behaviour. Questions are raised regarding the focus of treatment. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/erv.761 (AN 24169111)

    Attachment styles in adult intimate relationships: comparing women with bulimia nervosa symptoms, women with depression and women with no clinical symptoms. By: Evans, Lynette; Wertheim, Eleanor H.. European Eating Disorders Review, Jul/Aug2005, Vol. 13 Issue 4, p285-293, 9p, 2 charts Abstract: Objective Previous studies examining attachment styles in women with eating problems have investigated parental or peer relationships; this study investigated attachment styles in partner relationships. Women with clinical levels of bulimic symptoms (N = 55), subclinical bulimic symptoms (N = 42), depression but no eating problems (N = 44) and no eating or depressed problems (N = 80) from largely a community sample participated. Method Participants who responded to advertisements completed self-report questionnaires. Results Women with eating disorders and depression reported insecure attachment to partners and negative feelings towards their partner. Women in the control group reported secure attachment and positive feelings towards their partner. Discussion Insecure attachment and poor-quality relationships are problematic for women with clinical disturbances. Further exploration of treatment and development of models of aetiology and maintenance of these disorders should consider functioning in relationships. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/erv.621 (AN 17671352)

    Eating disorders, attachment and interpersonal difficulties: a comparison between 18- to 24-year-old patients and normal controls. By: Broberg, Anders G.; Hjalmers, Ingrid; Nevonen, Lauri. European Eating Disorders Review, Nov/Dec2001, Vol. 9 Issue 6, p381-396, 16p, 5 charts Abstract: This study tested the connection between eating disorder symptoms, insecure attachment, and other interpersonal difficulties. The sample consisted of 145 female patients (aged 18 to 24 years), who had attended an outpatient clinic for eating disorders in the city of Göteborg, Sweden, and 315 women chosen at random from the city's Population Register. Subjects filled in the Relationship Questionnaire (Bartholomew and Horowitz, <BIBR>1991</BIBR>) and the Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (Garner, <BIBR>1991</BIBR>). The results confirm the link between eating disorders, insecure attachment and interpersonal problems that has been found in other studies, and extends it to women in the normal control group who report that they have previously had eating disorder problems. Our results further indicate that severity of eating disorders problems is related to security of attachment, whereas type of eating disorder is related to scores on the psychological subscales of the EDI-2. The implications for psychological treatment are discussed. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/erv.421 (AN 11820685)

    Do broken relationships in childhood relate to bulimic women breaking off psychotherapy in adulthood? By: Mahon, Jennifer; Winston, Anthony P.; Palmer, Robert L.; Harvey, Peter K.. International Journal of Eating Disorders, Mar2001, Vol. 29 Issue 2, p139-149, 11p, 1 chart, 4 graphs Abstract: Objective/Method The case notes of 111 women presenting consecutively to an outpatient eating disorders clinic with bulimia nervosa or atypical bulimia nervosa were reviewed for pretreatment factors that predicted dropout in a retrospective study. Dropping out was conceptualized as not just a patient characteristic but as a transaction between patient and therapist. Factors believed to influence this transaction included experiences of childhood trauma, severity of eating disorder characteristics and comorbid psychiatric symptoms, demographic characteristics, waiting times for assessment and therapy, distance traveled to the clinic, previous experience of psychiatric treatment, and Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) and Rosenberg Self-Esteem questionnaire results. Results Witnessing parental breakup, being younger, being employed outside the home, and having previous experience of psychiatric treatment predicted dropping out in logistic regression models. Experiences of childhood trauma had a dose-effect relationship with dropping out. Having lower overall severity of eating disorder characteristics may also relate to dropping out. Discussion An impaired ability to trust resulting from disturbed attachments may link childhood trauma and dropping out. © 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 29: 139-149, 2001. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 4125279)

    Ne ho disponibili anche altri. Se vi servono, mandatemi un PM con la vostra mail.

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  5. #5
    Partecipante Veramente Figo L'avatar di Celeste
    Data registrazione
    05-06-2006
    Messaggi
    1,142

    Riferimento: tesi bulimia e attaccamento

    grazieeee!!!il tuo è veramente un aiuto prezioso!!! ti mando un pm cn l'email

  6. #6

    Riferimento: tesi bulimia e attaccamento

    In genere le università sono abbonate a tutte (o quasi) le riviste scientifiche nazionali ed internazionali. Basta farsi fare una richiesta scritta dal proprio relatore per potervi accedere. Alla Sapienza c'è il centro calcolo dove si può accedere per la ricerca bibliografica di tesi o tesine...sicuramente ci sarà una cosa simile anche nella tua università

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