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Discussione: consiglio

  1. #1
    Partecipante Esperto
    Data registrazione
    11-01-2007
    Residenza
    livorno beach
    Messaggi
    251

    consiglio

    Salve a tutti!sapreste consigliarmi in particolare qualche autore che si è occupato di relazione di coppia dal punto di vista affettivo e dell'intimità,dell'attaccamento?sto leggendo una marea di libri ma non leggo esattamente ciò che voglio..grazie

  2. #2
    Partecipante Affezionato
    Data registrazione
    21-12-2008
    Residenza
    Roma
    Messaggi
    118

    Riferimento: consiglio

    Cutrona CE, Shaffer PA, Wesner KA, Gardner KA. Cutrona CE, Shaffer PA, Wesner KA, Gardner KA. Optimally matching support and perceived spousal sensitivity. J Fam Psychol. 2007 Dec;21(4):754-8.
    Partner sensitivity is an important antecedent of both intimacy (H. T. Reis & P. Shaver, 1988) and attachment (M. D. S. Ainsworth, 1989). On the basis of the optimal matching model of social support (C. E. Cutrona & D. Russell, 1990), support behaviors that "matched" the support goals of the stressed individual were predicted to lead to the perception of partner sensitivity. Predictions were tested with 59 married couples, who engaged in a videotaped self-disclosure task. Matching support was defined as the disclosure of emotions followed by emotional support or a request for information followed by informational support. Partial evidence was found for the predictions. Matching support following the disclosure of emotions was predictive of perceived partner sensitivity. Mismatched support following the disclosure of emotions predicted lower marital satisfaction, through the mediation of partner sensitivity. Matching support following a request for information was not predictive of perceived partner sensitivity, but negative partner responses (e.g., criticism or sarcasm) following a request for information negatively predicted perceptions of partner sensitivity. The importance of considering the context of support transactions is discussed.

    Kirby JS, Baucom DH, Peterman MA. An investigation of unmet intimacy needs in marital relationships. J Marital Fam Ther. 2005 Oct;31(4)13-25.
    In this investigation we examined partners' responses to unmet intimacy needs in hopes of better understanding how these responses may affect intimacy satisfaction and overall relationship satisfaction. Eighty-four married couples, plus four additional husbands and 12 additional wives, were recruited from the community and completed measures of relationship satisfaction, intimacy need
    satisfaction, and attributional and communication responses to unmet intimacy needs. Consistent with the proposed mediational model, less negative attributional and communication responses to unmet intimacy needs were found to be beneficial for overall intimacy satisfaction and relationship satisfaction. In addition, more positive communication responses contributed to greater intimacy
    satisfaction. Limitations and clinical implications of the current study and directions for future work are discussed.


    Laurenceau JP, Barrett LF, Rovine MJ. The interpersonal process model of intimacy in marriage: a daily-diary and multilevel modeling approach. J Fam Psychol. 2005 Jun;19(2)14-23.
    This study used daily reports of interactions in marriage to examine predictions from the conceptualization of intimacy as the outcome of an interpersonal process. Both partners of 96 married couples completed daily diaries assessing self-disclosure, partner disclosure, perceived partner responsiveness, and intimacy on each of 42 consecutive days. Multivariate multilevel modeling
    revealed that self-disclosure and partner disclosure both significantly and uniquely contributed to the contemporaneous prediction of intimacy. Perceived partner responsiveness partially mediated the effects of self-disclosure and partner disclosure on intimacy. Global marital satisfaction, relationship
    intimacy, and demand-withdraw communication were related to daily levels of intimacy. Implications for the importance of perceived partner responsiveness in the intimacy process for married partners are discussed.

    Lawson DM, Brossart DF. Intergenerational transmission: individuation and intimacy across three generations. Fam Process. 2001 Winter;40(4):429-42.
    This study examined the transmission of intergenerational family processes across three generations, employing Williamson's construct of Personal Authority in the Family System (PAFS) as a theoretical back-drop. From a PAFS perspective, psychological health is viewed as directly related to the degree of individuation and intimacy (PAFS) experienced within the family of origin. Overall, the results provided a degree of support for the intergenerational transmission hypothesis.
    The strongest predictor of the transmission process was from the participant/parent relationship to the participant/spouse relationship (spousal fusion/individuation). Separate male and female analyses of the Spousal Fusion/Individuation model found a moderate effect for females and a large effect for males. A small effect was found in predicting nuclear family triangulation from parent and spouse variables, although there was no gender effect. The findings suggest that degree of individuation and its related constructs are more critical in the transmission process than is intimacy.


    Greeff AP, Malherbe HL. Intimacy and marital satisfaction in spouses. J Sex Marital Ther. 2001 May-Jun;27(3):247-57.
    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between intimacy and marital satisfaction of couples in different stages of the family life cycle. The Personal Assessment of Intimacy in Relationships (PAIR) questionnaire (Schaefer & Olson, 1981) and a subscale of the Enriching and Nurturing Relationship Issues, Communication and Happiness (ENRICH) questionnaire (Olson, Fournier, & Druckman, 1982) were administered to 57 couples. Significant differences between men and women were found on two of the five aspects of experienced intimacy (sexual and recreational) as well as for social and sexual discrepancy scores (difference between experienced and desired intimacy). With the exception of social intimacy as experienced by women, a positive correlation was found for both sexes between all the components of experienced intimacy and marital satisfaction. No
    differences were found for experienced intimacy or marital satisfaction according to family developmental stages.


    Heller PE, Wood B. The process of intimacy: similarity, understanding and gender. J Marital Fam Ther. 1998 Jul;24(3):273-88.
    This study examined gender and three aspects of marital intimacy using a method to establish both objective and subjective indices of intimacy. Fifty couples answered the Personal Assessment of Intimate Relationships (Schaefer & Olson, 1981) twice: once as a self-report and once to respond as they predicted their spouses would answer. Couples who were less accurate in predicting each other's responses also diverged in their experience of intimacy and reported lower intimacy. Results suggest that high intimacy is based on both understanding and similarity of intimate experience. Women reported significantly higher levels of intimacy and were also better than men in predicting their partners' feelings. These findings suggest that women may be more attuned to intimacy or that definitions and assessment of intimacy are gender biased or both.

    Eshel Y, Sharabany R, Friedman U. Friends, lovers and spouses: intimacy in young adults. Br J Soc Psychol. 1998 Mar;37 ( Pt 1):41-57.
    Intimacy in young heterosexual adults was studied as a function of their familial roles. The 168 males and females employed represented four familial role groups: late adolescents, single adults, married people and parents. Participants were administered two forms of an Intimacy Scale (Sharabany, 1994) in which they described their desired and their obtained intimacy with a same-sex and an opposite-sex best friend. Results indicated that (a) intimacy of adults with opposite-sex partner was higher than intimacy with same-sex friend. (b) Although no direct effect of familial role on intimacy was found, the married and parent groups displayed greater intimacy towards their spouses than late adolescents and single adults towards their opposite-sex partners. (c) Women who were late adolescents and women who were married scored significantly higher than men in intimacy. However, single women expressed significantly lower intimacy than single men. (d) Higher intimacy with opposite-sex partner was associated with a concurrent lower same-sex intimacy. (e) Satisfaction with other-sex partner was
    higher in the married group than in the other groups.

    Waring E, McElrath D, Lefcoe D, Weisz G. Dimensions of intimacy in marriage. Psychiatry. 1981 May;44(2):169-75.
    Intimacy as an important aspect of interpersonal relationships has been widely accepted (Erikson 1950, Sullivan 1953). In the broad context, an understanding of the role of intimacy has been discussed as essential to the development of a science of interpersonal relationships (Hinde 1978). More specifically, intimacy has been cited as an important dimension of the marital interpersonal relationship (Berman and Lief 1975). This paper describes a study of intimacy in 30 young married couples, randomly selected from the general population. Personal identity and accurate perception of the spouse were significant correlates of marital intimacy, and a factor analysis revealed four dimensions of marital relationships: compatibility, structure, intimacy, and problem-solving. In this study, marital adjustment was significantly correlated with expressiveness, commitment, organization, expressed affection, and the absence of conflict. These findings are discussed in the context of the role of intimacy in a science of interpersonal behavior.

  3. #3
    Partecipante Esperto
    Data registrazione
    11-01-2007
    Residenza
    livorno beach
    Messaggi
    251

    Riferimento: consiglio

    grazie mille!!!un angelo!!!adesso provo a recuperarli in rete!!!

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