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Visualizzazione risultati 1 fino 5 di 5
  1. #1
    Partecipante Esperto L'avatar di *trikky*
    Data registrazione
    09-10-2005
    Residenza
    roma
    Messaggi
    342

    aiuto per bibliografia!

    Salve a tutti/e!! Una parte della mia tesi riguarda la "dipendenza da esercizio fisico" ma purtroppo ho trovato pochissimo materiale.. c'è qualcuno che può suggerirmi testi o articoli da consultare?? grazie mille!
    Quella mattina erano apparse le nuvole.Scorrevano veloci su un cielo stinto proiettando macchie scure sui campi di grano e si tenevano stretta la loro pioggia portandola chissà dove.

  2. #2
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: aiuto per bibliografia!

    Addictive Personality Factors.
    By: Kagan, Dona M.. Journal of Psychology, Nov87, Vol. 121 Issue 6, p533, 6p, 2 charts Abstract: This study was designed to compare mean scores obtained by alcoholics, compulsive gamblers, smokers, chronic joggers, and control subjects on six subfactors of the MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale. Results indicated that some MacAndrew factors may be more sensitive to addictive pathology than others. Alcoholics emerged as the most pathological group, in terms of scores on the Cognitive Impairment, Social Maladjustment, and Risk Taking scales. Gamblers and smokers appeared to be distinctly different, more socially oriented addicts. Frequency of jogging was negatively related to measures of addiction but positively related to measures of compulsiveness. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 5370574)


    Exercising for the wrong reasons: relationships among eating disorder beliefs, dysfunctional exercise beliefs and coping.
    By: Loumidis, Konstantinos; Wells, Adrian. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, Nov/Dec2001, Vol. 8 Issue 6, p416-423, 8p, 1 chart Abstract: Physical exercise is both a healthy and a maladaptive behaviour—yet, it is often unquestionably recommended as a coping strategy, due to its anxiolytic and antidepressant properties. This study examines maladaptive beliefs associated with eating disorders and to the clinical condition of exercise dependence (or addiction) in relation to coping. One hundred exercisers completed measures of eating disorder beliefs, dysfunctional exercise beliefs, types of coping and level of exercise. Eating disorder beliefs were related to dysfunctional exercise beliefs concerning physical appearance, social desirability and inability to function mentally or emotionally. Eating disorder beliefs were positively associated with emotional coping and negatively correlated with task-oriented coping. Exercise beliefs were associated with avoidance coping (distraction). On some components of eating disorder beliefs, between 2 and 15% of exercisers held scored within a clinical range. Unless clinicians exclude the presence of dysfunctional exercise beliefs, eating disorder beliefs and maladaptive coping, they might be paradoxically encouraging exercise for the wrong reasons. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/cpp.298 (AN 11820386)


    Definitions and measures of exercise dependence.
    By: Allegre, Benjamin; Souville, Marc; Therme, Pierre; Griffiths, Mark. Addiction Research & Theory, Dec2006, Vol. 14 Issue 6, p631-646, 16p Abstract: The aim of this review is to synthesize the knowledge about the definitions and measures of exercise dependence based on the few studies available in the literature. This review presents the evolution of exercise dependence conceptualization (measures and definitions) around a number of key considerations and debates. Each of these considerations conceptualizes excessive exercise as a form of dependence. This article overviews a number of distinct areas: (i) the positive and/or negative nature of exercise dependence, (ii) the link between exercise dependence and eating disorders, (iii) the elaboration of diagnostic criteria for exercise dependence, and (iv) the use of substance dependence and the behavioral component model of addiction to conceptualize exercise dependence. Future research areas are also briefly outlined. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/16066350600903302 (AN 23828590)


    The exercise addiction inventory: a new brief screening tool.
    By: Terry, Annabel; Szabo, Attila; Griffiths, Mark. Addiction Research & Theory, Oct2004, Vol. 12 Issue 5, p489-499, 11p Abstract: Many attempts have been made to define and measure problem exercising but there has not been any successful attempt to produce a psychometrically sound assessment instrument. The aim of the present study was to develop a psychometric instrument (the Exercise Addiction Inventory, EAI) capable of identifying people at risk from exercise addiction. The intention was to develop a short form inventory that would be quick and simple to administer. The EAI was operationalised using the components of behavioural addiction proposed by Griffiths ( Griffiths, M.D. (1996) . Behavioural addiction: an issue for everybody? Journal of Workplace Learning , 8 (3), 19-25). The study presents the psychometric properties of the EAI, which are manifested in very good internal reliability, content validity, concurrent validity, and construct validity. It is concluded that the EAI could be a valid and reliable instrument capable of quickly and easily identifying individuals at risk from exercise addiction. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/16066350310001637363 (AN 14990217)


    A qualitative study of the meaning of exercise for people who could be labelled as 'addicted' to exercise -can 'addiction' be applied to high frequency exercising?
    By: Cox, Rachel; Orford, Jim. Addiction Research & Theory, Apr2004, Vol. 12 Issue 2, p167-188, 22p, 1 chart Abstract: This is a qualitative study exploring the meaning of exercise for individuals who could be labelled as 'addicted'. Sixty people originally volunteered to participate of whom twelve scored above the midpoint on the Exercise Dependence Questionnaire (Ogden, J., Veale, D. and Summers, Z., 1997 ). Ten people were subsequently interviewed. A grounded theory approach was employed to analyse the data (Strauss, A. and Corbin, J., 1990 ). Themes that emerged were centred around control, the body, the positive and negative consequences of high frequency exercise and whether exercise is a means to an end or an end in itself. The discussion concentrates on how addiction diminished in relevance and importance for the participants when exploring meanings behind their exercising. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/1606635310001634537 (AN 12595757)


    Muscle dysmorphia, gym addiction and associated risk taking behaviours in young men.
    By: Kostanski, M.; Cassar, P.. Australian Journal of Psychology, Aug2003 Supplement, Vol. 55, p190-190, 1/5p Abstract: Research indicates that the number of men reported to be exercising has soared dramatically within recent time. Increases in dysfunctional eating, muscle dysmorphobia, gym addiction and use of supplemental bodybuilding aids amongst men worldwide have also been recorded. The aim of this research was to investigate the prominence of muscle dysmorphobia, risk taking behaviours (i.e., supplement use and dysfunction eating) and it's association with gym-addiction in young men. Fifty nine males aged 18 to 32 years, participated in a self-report survey which included the Body Checking Questionnaire (BCQ), Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS), Risk Behaviour Questionnaire (ARQ), The Eating Disturbance Scale (EDS-5) and the Exercise Importance Scale (EIS). Results indicated that gym addiction is high and strongly associated with risk taking behaviours such as supplement use and dysfunctional eating, muscle dysmorphia and body image dissatisfaction. Considering the huge increases in male gym attendance, these results are of some concern. However further prospective studies are required before one can ascertain what may be the potential vulnerability and causal factors of such behaviours. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 11893515)


    EXCESSIVE EXERCISE AS AN ADDICTION: A REVIEW.
    By: Adams, Jeremy; Kirkby, Robert J.. Addiction Research & Theory, Oct2002, Vol. 10 Issue 5, p415-437, 23p; Abstract: The article focuses on the physiological theories of exercise addiction and the study of withdrawal from exercise. Several physiological mechanisms including catecholamines, dopamine pathways and endogenous opioids have implications in exercise dependence. Researchers suggest that a form of auto-addiction to these hormones might be responsible for exercise addiction. Moreover, the increased stimulation of dopaminergenic brain structures by exercise provides another explanation for exercise dependence. DOI: 10.1080/1606635021000032366 (AN 7526763)


    Personality and behaviour associated with excessive dependence on exercise: Some reflections from research.
    By: Basson, C.J.. South African Journal of Psychology, Jun2001, Vol. 31 Issue 2, p53, 7p, 1 chart Abstract: This paper examines possible links between negative addiction to running and personality variables. More specifically, it addresses the question of why only certain runners become addicted to running and whether there is a unique interaction between personality variables and specific reinforcing aspects of running. Drawing on the results of four studies conducted in an ongoing research programme at the University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, significant trends that have emerged with regard to the personality attributes of addicted runners are highlighted and explained. In particular, the studies provide preliminary supportive evidence for personality differences between extremely dependent and non-dependent groups of runners. It appears that excessive dependence on running is associated with generally rigid, inflexible personality patterns rather than specific personality pathology. The findings further suggest an association between negative addiction to running and interpersonal difficulties. Using Theodore Millon's Biosocial learning theory of personality as the conceptual framework for interpreting these results, this paper offers explanations of how the identified personality pattern of highly dependent runners interacts with the contextual and physiological variables elicited by running to maintain addictive behaviour. Finally, this paper suggests a number of directions for future research into excessive exercise dependence. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 6351571)


    Running and cocaine both upregulate dynorphin mRNA in medial caudate putamen.
    By: Werme, Martin; Thorén, Peter; Olson, Lars; Brené, Stefan. European Journal of Neuroscience, Aug2000, Vol. 12 Issue 8, p2967-2974, 8p Abstract: AbstractPhysical activities such as long-distance running can be habit forming and associated with a sense of well-being to a degree that justifies comparison with drug-induced addictive behaviours. To understand molecular similarities and dissimilarities controlling these behaviours in humans we compared the effects of running in running wheels to the effects of chronic cocaine or morphine administration on mRNA levels in brain reward pathways in the inbred Fischer and Lewis rat strains. These strains are both inbred from the Sprague–Dawley strain; Lewis rats display a higher preference towards addictive drugs and running than do Fischer rats. After chronic cocaine or running a similar increase of dynorphin mRNA in medial caudate putamen was found in the Lewis rat, suggesting common neuronal adaptations in this brain region to both cocaine and running. Fischer and Lewis rats both responded to cocaine with increased dynorphin mRNA levels in medial caudate putamen. However, only Lewis rats increased dynorphin mRNA after running, possibly reflecting the much higher degree of running by the Lewis strain as compared to the Fischer strain. Moreover, the running-induced upregulation of dynorphin mRNA was blocked by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. We suggest that running increases dynorphin mRNA by a mechanism that involves endogenous opioids. The voluntary wheel-running model in rats might be used to study natural reward and compulsive behaviours and possibly also to screen candidate drugs for treatment of compulsive disorders. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1046/j.1460-9568.2000.00147.x (AN 5184833)


    Tutto qui. Ma dalla bibliografia dei vari articoli dovresti riuscire a recuperare anche altro materiale.

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  3. #3
    Partecipante Leggendario L'avatar di sara1985
    Data registrazione
    09-09-2008
    Residenza
    Rimini
    Messaggi
    2,009

    Riferimento: aiuto per bibliografia!

    willy...sei veramente un angelo!!!!!!
    " Bambini senza amore finiranno con l'essere adulti pieni di odio..." Renè Spitz

  4. #4
    Partecipante Esperto L'avatar di *trikky*
    Data registrazione
    09-10-2005
    Residenza
    roma
    Messaggi
    342

    Riferimento: aiuto per bibliografia!

    Willy!! ho appena letto il tuo post!! grazie mille davvero!!!!
    :-*
    Quella mattina erano apparse le nuvole.Scorrevano veloci su un cielo stinto proiettando macchie scure sui campi di grano e si tenevano stretta la loro pioggia portandola chissà dove.

  5. #5
    Partecipante Affezionato L'avatar di psicory82
    Data registrazione
    07-02-2005
    Residenza
    ##in aereo tra nord e sud##
    Messaggi
    109

    Riferimento: aiuto per bibliografia!

    io sto preparando una tesi sull'omicidio-suicidio mancato e ho bisogno di almeno 10 articoli scientifici, anche in inglese...qlcn ha dei suggerimenti?

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