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  1. #1
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    Articoli sulle new addictions

    Salve, qualcuno saprebbe consigliarmi qualche articolo scientifico sulle nuove dipendenze, in particolare sul gioco d'azzardo e lo shopping compulsivo?GRAZIE1000

  2. #2
    Partecipante Affezionato L'avatar di terry222
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    Riferimento: Articoli sulle new addictions

    anch io farò la tesi su questo argomento...andrai al convegno che si terrà domani
    terry222

  3. #3
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    Riferimento: Articoli sulle new addictions

    no, purtoppo non ne ero a conoscenza...

  4. #4
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    Riferimento: Articoli sulle new addictions

    ma tu studi a chieti?

  5. #5
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    salerno
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    Riferimento: Articoli sulle new addictions

    molti aticoli sono in inglese uffa

  6. #6
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
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    Riferimento: Articoli sulle new addictions

    Dunque, articoli sullo shopping complulsivo (rigorosamente in inglese, e che cavolo, non è mica greco antico...)


    Self-Ambivalence and Attachment to Possessions.
    By: Frost, Randy O.; Kyrios, Michael; McCarthy, Katherine; Matthews, Yanique. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, Fall2007, Vol. 21 Issue 3, p232-242, 11p, 4 charts Abstract: Doron and Kyrios (2005) have suggested that self-related constructs may be vulnerability factors for the development of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and associated cognitions, possibly including compulsive buying, hoarding, and materialism. The present study examined the relationship between self-related constructs (self-ambivalence and attachment uncertainty), compulsive acquisition, hoarding, and materialism. As predicted, self-ambivalence and uncertainty were correlated with materialism, compulsive hoarding, and compulsive buying, while compulsive acquisition of free things was correlated with uncertainty. Furthermore, self-ambivalence accounted for significant variance in all three possession-related variables even after controlling for depression and indecisiveness. Uncertainty accounted for significant variance in the compulsive acquisition of free things. Materialism exhibited high to moderate correlations with compulsive buying but low to moderate correlations with compulsive hoarding and no association with free acquisition. Lack of family warmth failed to correlate with acquisition variables but did correlate with depression. Overall, the findings supported the contribution of self-ambivalence and attachment patterns but not early family environment to the understanding of compulsive acquisition, particularly hoarding and buying problems. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 26049881)



    Pathological Spending as a Form of Psychological Dependence.
    By: Glatt, Max M.; Cook, Christopher C.H.. British Journal of Addiction, Nov87, Vol. 82 Issue 11, p1257-1258, 2p Abstract: A case report is presented of A. B., a 24-year-old woman with a 6-year history of over-spending, which continued despite the considerable psycho-social damage to herself and her family. Features of this case are presented which demonstrate a type of 'psychological dependence' upon spending and which suggest that 'pathological spending' should be recognized as a previously undescribed syndrome. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 6273490)


    On Cumpulsive Shopping and Spending: A Psychodynamic Inquiry.
    By: Krueger, David W.. American Journal of Psychotherapy, Oct88, Vol. 42 Issue 4, p574, 11p; Abstract: Discusses how compulsive shopping and spending form a specific psychodynamic complex with common developmental precursors of pathological narcissism. Difference from other symptomatic uses of money and impulsive acts; Cases that illustrate some psychodynamic considerations of compulsive shopping; Compulsive shopping's representation of an attempt at affect regulation. (AN 5358955)


    The call of the mall.
    Psychology Today, Jan/Feb95, Vol. 28 Issue 1, p8, 1p, 1 color; Abstract: Focuses on compulsive shopping. Comparison of shopaholics to people with eating disorders; Findings of Ronald Faber, Ph.D., of the University of Minnesota; His belief that the problem arises from a convergence of psychological, social and biological factors; Low self-esteem, a probable motive behind compulsive buying. (AN 9502037500)


    Studies of the potential role of the dopamine D1 receptor gene in addictive behaviors.
    By: Comings, D.E.; Gade, R.; Wu, S.; Chiu, C.; Dietz, G.; Muhleman, D.; Saucier, G.; Ferry, L.; Rosenthal, R.J.; Lesieur, H.R.; Rugle, L.J.; MacMurray, P.. Molecular Psychiatry, 1997, Vol. 2 Issue 1, p44, 14p Abstract: Abnormalities in the dopaminergic reward pathways have frequently been implicated in substance abuse and addictive behaviors. Recent studies by Self and coworkers have suggested an important interaction between the dopamine D[sub 1] and D[sub 2] receptors in cocaine abuse. To test the hypothesis that the DRD1 gene might play a role in addictive behaviors we examined the alleles of the Dde I polymorphism in three independent groups of subjects with varying types of compulsive, addictive behaviors — Tourette syndrome probands, smokers and pathological gamblers. In all three groups there was a significant increase in the frequency of homozygosity for the DRD1 Dde I 1 or 2 alleles in subjects with addictive behaviors. The DRD1 11 or 22 genotype was present in 41.3% of 63 controls and 57.3% of 227 TS probands (P = 0.024). When 23 quantitative traits were examined by ANOVA those carrying the 11 genotype consistently had the highest scores. Based on these results, we examined the prevalence of the 11 genotype in controls, TS probands without a specific behavior, and TS probands with a specific behavior. There was a progressive, linear increase, significant at α ≤ 0.005 for scores for gambling, alcohol use and compulsive shopping. Problems with three additional behaviors, drug use, compulsive eating and smoking were significant at α ≤ 0.05. All six variables were related to addictive behaviors. In a totally separate group of controls and individuals attending a smoking cessation clinic, and smoking at least one pack per day, 39.3% of the controls versus 66.1% of the smokers carried the 11 or 22 genotype (P = 0.0002). In a third independent group of pathological gamblers, 55.8% carried the 11 or 22 genotype (P = 0.009 vs the combined controls). In the TS group and smokers there was a significant additive effect of the DRD1 and DRD2 genes. The results for both the DRD1 and DRD2 genes, which have opposing effects on cyclic AMP, were consistent with... [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 9012635)


    Understanding Compulsive Buying Among College Students: A Hierarchical Approach.
    By: Mowen, John C.; Spears, Nancy. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 1999, Vol. 8 Issue 4, p407, 24p, 1 chart, 1 bw Abstract: Borrowing from Allport (1961), we propose a hierarchical approach in which cardinal psychological traits predict central traits, which in turn predict surface traits. The hierarchical perspective was employed to investigate the surface trait of compulsive buying among college students-a growing problem at U.S. universities. In Study 1, traits from the Five-Factor Model of personality were employed as cardinal traits, the needs for arousal and for materialism were employed as central traits, and compulsive buying was the dependent variable. Structural equation modeling was employed to find the best fitting model, which accounted for 19% of the variance in compulsive buying. In Study 2, this model was confirmed and accounted for 28% of the variance in compulsive buying. Implications for theory and for understanding compulsive buying are identified. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 3349301)


    Curbing the costs of compulsive shopping.
    By: Larkin, Marilynn. Lancet, 12/23/2000, Vol. 356 Issue 9248, p2163, 1/3p, 1 color; Abstract: Describes a study in which selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor was given to compulsive shoppers. Reports of test subjects that they felt less compulsiveness; Use of this class of drugs in treating other compulsive behaviors; Teatments for compulsive shopping. (AN 3898590)


    The Influence of Culture on Consumer Impulsive Buying Behavior.
    By: Kacen, Jacqueline J.; Lee, Julie Anne. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 2002, Vol. 12 Issue 2, p163-176, 14p, 4 charts Abstract: Impulse buying generates over $4 billion in annual sales volume in the United States. With the growth of e-commerce and television shopping channels, consumers have easy access to impulse purchasing opportunities, but little is known about this sudden, compelling, hedonically complex purchasing behavior in non-Western cultures. Yet cultural factors moderate many aspects of consumer's impulsive buying behavior, including self-identity, normative influences, the suppression of emotion, and the postponement of instant gratification. From a multi-country survey of consumers in Australia, United States, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Malaysia, our analyses show that both regional level factors (individualism–collectivism) and individual cultural difference factors (independent –interdependent self-concept) systematically influence impulsive purchasing behavior. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1207/153276602760078686 (AN 6943097)


    Impulsive behavior in a consumer culture.
    By: Hartston, Heidi J; Koran, Lorrin M. International Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice, Jun2002, Vol. 6 Issue 2, p65-68, 4p Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Compulsive shopping behaviour has recently received long overdue attention as a clinical issue. Curiosity about this condition has led to questions about its identification, characterization as a disorder, and treatment. METHOD: This article presents two case vignettes illustrating diagnostic criteria and points that distinguish this disorder from OCD hoarding or mania. These issues are discussed. RESULTS: The authors present some suggested treatment approaches CONCLUSION: Greater awareness of the prevalence and social consequences of compulsive shopping behaviour highlights the need for treatment and for educational resources for clinicians and the general public. (Int J Psych Clin Pract 2002; 6: 65–68). [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/136515002753724045 (AN 6706076)


    The Relationship between Compulsive Buying and Eating Disorders.
    By: Mitchell, James E.; Redlin, Jennifer; Wonderlich, Steve; Crosby, Ross; Faber, Ronm; Miltenberger, Rayt; Smyth, Joshua. International Journal of Eating Disorders, Jul2002, Vol. 32 Issue 1, p107-111, 5p; Abstract: Examines the relationship between compulsive buying and eating disorders. Details on the possible lifetime history of substance abuse or dependence for compulsive buyers; Information on the increase risk for eating disorders in compulsive buyers; Prevalence of depressive symptoms in compulsive buyers. (AN 7033156)


    In The News: Retail therapy.
    By: Wood, Heather. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, Sep2003, Vol. 4 Issue 9, p700-700, 1p; Abstract: Focuses on a research on the use of antidepressant drug citalopram to compulsive shoppers in California. Efficacy of the drug in reducing interest in shopping; Side effects of the drug. DOI: 10.1038/nrn1211 (AN 10706502)


    Three cases of compulsive buying treated with naltrexone.
    By: Grant, Jon E.. International Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice, Sep2003, Vol. 7 Issue 3, p223, 3p Abstract: OBJECTIVE To examine a possible treatment option for a relatively common and disabling disorder currently lacking a pharmacotherapeutic intervention. METHOD Three patients fulfilling criteria for compulsive buying without comorbidity were treated with naltrexone to reduce urges to shop and shopping behavior. RESULTS Treatment with high-dose naltrexone (100-200 mg/day) led to partial or complete remission of urges to shop and compulsive shopping behavior in all three cases. Discontinuation and re-challenge with the medication provides further support that improvement was due to naltrexone. CONCLUSION Naltrexone in high doses shows promise for the treatment of compulsive buying. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 10779132)


    Materialism and Attitudes Toward Money: An Exploratory Investigation.
    By: Christopher, Andrew N.; Marek, Pam; Carroll, Stephen M.. Individual Differences Research, Aug2004, Vol. 2 Issue 2, p109-117, 9p Abstract: To explore the relationship between materialism and money attitudes, 204 American college students completed Richins and Dawson's (1992) Materialism Scale and Fumham's (1984) Money Beliefs and Behaviors Scale (MBBS). Correlational analyses revealed that materialism was positively related to feelings of inadequacy about money and the tendency to use money as a means of self-aggrandizament. Materialism was negatively related m the conservative approach m money, and was unrelated to negative emotions toward money. We discuss how the link between money and possessions may be mediated by materialism and raise questions about a possible relationship between materialism and compulsive shopping. Further research is suggested to illuminate the interplay between materialism, the acquisition of money, and dysfunctional money behaviors. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 14651115)


    UNCONVENTIONAL WISDOM.
    By: Marano, Hara Estroff. Psychology Today, Mar/Apr2005, Vol. 38 Issue 2, p13-14, 2p, 1 color; Abstract: Offers advice on interpersonal relationships. Suggestions for helping a compulsive hoarder and shopaholic husband; Recommended approach of helping an alcoholic husband recover; Way of handling a husband who spends more time with his friends after coming home from a military mission. (AN 16158815)


    A NEW LOOK AT "COMPULSIVE BUYING": SELF-DISCREPANCIES AND MATERIALISTIC VALUES AS PREDICTORS OF COMPULSIVE BUYING TENDENCY.
    By: Dittmar, Helga. Journal of Social & Clinical Psychology, Sep2005, Vol. 24 Issue 6, p832-859, 28p Abstract: Compulsive buying is a widespread dysfunctional consumer behavior that is still not well understood, and existing clinical conceptualizations view it as a manifestation of other underlying psychiatric disorders. This article intends to improve understanding through developing and testing a new perspective on compulsive buying as identity-seeking behavior that is driven jointly by self-discrepancies and endorsement of materialistic values. It presents three studies-a qualitative exploration using shopping diaries, and two quantitative surveys-which provide convergent evidence that compulsive buying is characterized by the motivation to move closer to an "ideal self" through material goods. For women, who constitute the great majority of compulsive buyers, there was good support for the two-factor model in both middle and young adulthood. For young men, materialistic values, but not self-discrepancies, were a significant predictor. Conceptual and treatment implications are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 18569319)


    Compulsive buying -- a growing concern? An examination of gender, age, and endorsement of materialistic values as predictors.
    By: Dittmar, Helga. British Journal of Psychology, Nov2005, Vol. 96 Issue 4, p467-491, 25p, 5 charts Abstract: Compulsive buying is an understudied, but growing, dysfunctional consumer behaviour with harmful psychological and financial consequences. Clinical perspectives treat it as a psychiatric disorder, whereas recent proposals emphasize the increasing endorsement of materialistic values as a cause of uncontrolled buying (e.g. Dittmar, 2004b; Kasser & Kanner, 2004). The present research aims to improve understanding of compulsive buying through examining gender, age, and endorsement of materialistic values as key predictors in three UK questionnaire studies, which sampled individuals who had contacted a self-help organization and residentially matched 'controls' (N = 330), consumer panelists from a multinational corporation (N = 250), and 16- to 18-year-old adolescents (N = 195). The results confirmed previously documented gender differences, and showed that younger people are more prone to compulsive buying. The central findings were that materialistic value endorsement emerged as the strongest predictor of individuals' compulsive buying, and that it significantly mediated the observed age differences. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1348/000712605X53533 (AN 18819846)


    A Compulsive Buying Case: A Qualitative Analysis by the Grounded Theory Method.
    By: Tai-Young Park; Sung-Hui Cho; Seo, Jinsook Helen. Contemporary Family Therapy: An International Journal, Jun2006, Vol. 28 Issue 2, p239-249, 11p, 2 diagrams Abstract: This study analyzed a case of compulsive buying based on the grounded theory method. The client was a 24 year-old female Korean student who showed compulsive buying and excessive credit card use. The family therapy was performed between March 2001 and May 2004 in Korea. This study used the software “Atlas.ti,” producing 121 open codings and seven axis categories which included the following: (1) communication issues with friends or family members, (2) sibling relationships, (3) mother’s parenting, (4) interparental relationships, (5) mother’s communication style, (6) stress, and (7) compulsive buying and credit card use. This study presented the graphical network among these categories in order to show the effectiveness of family therapy. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1007/s10591-006-9002-2 (AN 21272996)


    Individual factors associated with buying addiction: An empirical study.
    By: Rodríguez-Villarino, Rafael; González-Lorenzo, Manuel; Fernández-González, Ángel; Lameiras-Fernández, María; Foltz, Marika L.. Addiction Research & Theory, Oct2006, Vol. 14 Issue 5, p511-525, 15p, 2 charts Abstract: This study analyses the relationship between buying addiction and a set of individual factors. The results show that addictive buying is significantly associated with the personal variables considered in our research; what is more, the discriminant analysis carried out suggests a “hierarchy” of defining factors common to those individuals who present a high level of addictive buying: anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsiveness are the variables which are most closely linked to this psychological addiction, followed by passive coping, low self-esteem, low conscientiousness, external locus of control, and sensation seeking, respectively. The implications and potential limitations of these findings, as well as some recommendations for future research, are presented. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/16066350500527979 (AN 22848023)


    Materialism and Money Spending Disposition as Predictors of Economic and Personality Variables.
    By: Troisi, Jordan D.; Christopher, Andrew N.; Marek, Pam. North American Journal of Psychology, 2006, Vol. 8 Issue 3, p421-436, 16p Abstract: This research explored the relationships between materialism and money spending attitudes on impulse buying tendencies, attitudes toward debt, sensation seeking, and openness to experience. Students and other adults (N = 266) completed a materialism scale, portions of two money conservation scales, an impulse buying scale, an attitudes toward debt scale, a sensation seeking scale, and an openness to experience scale. Simultaneous-entry multiple regression analyses revealed that materialism and money conservation were predictive of impulse buying, sensation seeking, and openness to experience. Two marginally significant interactions emerged. Individuals less materialistic and tight with money had particularly negative attitudes toward debt, and individuals less materialistic and loose with money were particularly open to experience. Results are discussed with respect to how materialism may be related to a variety of individual difference variables, both at the main effect level and in interaction with money spending attitudes. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 23452898)

    .
    Compulsive buying.
    By: Miller, Michael Craig. Harvard Mental Health Letter, Jan2007, Vol. 23 Issue 7, p8-8, 3/4p; Abstract: The article focuses on compulsive buying. Buying has become either a compulsion or addiction for many consumers. It is now regarded as an impulse-control disorder or a form of obsessive-compulsive disorder. The habits of consumers with compulsive buying are mentioned as well as the treatment options. (AN 23532093)


    WHEN A BETTER SELF IS ONLY A BUTTON CLICK AWAY: ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN MATERIALISTIC VALUES, EMOTIONAL AND IDENTITY-RELATED BUYING MOTIVES, AND COMPULSIVE BUYING TENDENCY ONLINE.
    By: Dittmar, Helga; Long, Karen; Bond, Rod. Journal of Social & Clinical Psychology, Mar2007, Vol. 26 Issue 3, p334-361, 28p Abstract: Compulsive buying of consumer goods increasingly occurs in conventional shops and stores, but has also started to emerge when people buy online. Extending previous research (e.g., Dittmar, 2005a, b), a model of vulnerability factors is proposed whereby the endorsement of materialistic values predicts individuals' seeking to enhance their emotions and identity when they buy goods, which, in turn, predicts tendencies toward compulsive buying. This model is tested with respect to the Internet, a fast-growing alternative to conventional buying. A preliminary survey (n = 110) confirmed emotional enhancement and identity gains (in addition to economic concerns and efficiency) as distinct online buying dimensions. The findings of the main survey (n= 126) provided good initial support for the proposed model, showing that materialistic individuals who seek to enhance their emotions and identity when buying goods online reported the strongest tendencies toward compulsive buying on the Internet. Implications for intervention are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 25056473)
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  7. #7
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
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    Per quanto riguarda il gioco d'azzardo ho sottomano un centinaio di articoli. Troppi per postarli. Chi li vuole mi mandi un PM con la sua mail.

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  8. #8
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    Non so come ringraziarti willy 61, mamma mia quanto materiale!!! Grazie mille...
    P.S. Per quanto riguarda il gioco d'azzardo e i tanti articoli che dici di avere, ti serei grata di averli......ma scusa ignoranza, cos'è il PM tramite e-mail?

  9. #9
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
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    Citazione Originalmente inviato da ligias80 Visualizza messaggio
    Non so come ringraziarti willy 61, mamma mia quanto materiale!!! Grazie mille...
    P.S. Per quanto riguarda il gioco d'azzardo e i tanti articoli che dici di avere, ti serei grata di averli......ma scusa ignoranza, cos'è il PM tramite e-mail?
    Mandami un messaggio privato nel quale scrivi il tuo indirizzo di posta elettronica. Così posso mandarti direttamente gli articoli che ho senza doverli postare tutti sul forum (che è cosa lunga e complicata).

    Buona vita

    P.S.: Per mandare messaggi privati fai clic su "willy61" in alto a sinistra in questo messaggio. Ti dovrebbe apparire una finestra a scorrimento nella quale c'è scritto "Manda un messaggio privato a willy61". Fai clic su quella e ti si apre la finestra dei PM (Private Messages).

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  10. #10
    Partecipante Affezionato L'avatar di terry222
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    Riferimento: Articoli sulle new addictions

    cerco materiale sulla nuove dipendenze new addiction e in particolare sulla dipendenza da internet
    terry222

  11. #11
    Partecipante L'avatar di mary83p
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    cioa!!!! anche io sto facendo la tesi sulla dipendenza da Internet! Ti segnalo "New Addictions, le nuove dipendenze" Cesare Guerreschi, 2005, San Paolo e "La mente in Internet" Cantelmi et al., Piccin, 2000.
    tu come hai intenzione di strutturarla?

  12. #12
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di virgola25
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    vi segnalo questo sito per cercare gli articoli è molto fornito:

    PubMed Home

  13. #13
    Partecipante Affezionato L'avatar di terry222
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    grazie mille a tutti
    terry222

  14. #14

    Riferimento: Articoli sulle new addictions

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da virgola25 Visualizza messaggio
    vi segnalo questo sito per cercare gli articoli è molto fornito:

    PubMed Home
    Gli articoli, presenti sul sito che hai segnalato, si possono scaricare? ... se sì, come?

  15. #15
    Partecipante Affezionato L'avatar di SANTOSPIRITO
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    ragazzi ho bisogno di un consiglio vorrei chiedere la tesi al prof. di psicologia fisiologica e mi piacerebbe qlk riguardo la sterilità o dipendenza sessuale secondo voi può andare avete qlk spunto da darmi? grazieeeeeeeee
    Susy

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