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  1. #1
    Partecipante Affezionato L'avatar di Glendaks
    Data registrazione
    08-05-2006
    Messaggi
    60

    Tesi sul counseling oncologico

    Salve!!!
    Vorrei elaborare una tesi sul counseling oncologico!!!
    Qualcuno sa consigliarmi qualque libro in particolare!!! GRAZIE

  2. #2
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: Tesi sul counseling oncologico

    Coping and communication-enhancing intervention versus supportive counseling for women diagnosed with gynecological cancers. Manne, Sharon L.; Rubin, Stephen; Edelson, Mitchell; Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol 75(4), Aug 2007. pp. 615-628. [Journal Article] Abstract: This study compared the efficacy of 2 psychological interventions, a coping and communication-enhancing intervention (CCI) and supportive counseling (SC), in reducing depressive symptoms and cancer-specific distress of women diagnosed with gynecological cancer. Demographic, medical, and psychological moderators of intervention effects were evaluated. Three hundred fifty-three women with gynecological cancer were randomly assigned to 7 sessions of CCI, 7 sessions of SC, or usual care. Intent-to-treat growth curve analyses indicated that participants assigned to CCI and SC reported lower depressive symptoms than participants assigned to usual care at the 6- and 9-month follow-ups. Women with greater than average increases in physician-rated physical symptoms and/or women who were more expressive of positive emotions benefited more from SC than women with lower than average increases in symptom scores and/or women who were less expressive of positive emotions. These findings suggest that both interventions may be effective in treating depressive symptoms among patients with gynecological cancer. Future research should evaluate whether bolstering both psychological interventions with additional intervention sessions and topics in the disease trajectory will result in persistent long-term effects. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)
    EBSCOhost

    Both group peer counselling and individual counselling reduce anxiety and depression, and increase self-esteem and overall life satisfaction in palliative cancer care. By: Ramsay, Kimberley; Ramsay, Judith; Main, David. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, Jun2007, Vol. 20 Issue 2, p157-167, 11p Abstract: This study compared group peer counselling and individual counselling in relation to quality of life, well-being and perceived control in individuals receiving palliative cancer care. The study utilized a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design to assess the effectiveness of counselling type, in a sample of individuals diagnosed with breast, bowel or lung cancer. Nine females underwent group peer counselling and nine underwent individual counselling. Individuals were administered self-report questionnaires which included standardized subscales that measure quality of life in terms of psychological well-being and perceived locus of control before and after counselling. Both group peer counselling and individual counselling significantly increased self-esteem, self-reported levels of overall life satisfaction, and reduced anxiety and depression. Self-esteem, overall life satisfaction, and anxiety and depression were comparable in the two counselling types, both at outset and after counselling, however, individuals with internal locii of control scored higher for self-esteem on post-test, and lower for depression and anxiety, irrespective of type of counselling. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/09515070701240071 (AN 25508026)
    EBSCOhost

    The effect of peer counseling on quality of life following diagnosis of breast cancer: an observational study. By: Giese-Davis, Janine; Bliss-Isberg, Caroline; Carson, Kristin; Star, Path; Donaghy, Jessica; Cordova, Matthew J.; Stevens, Nita; Wittenberg, Lynne; Batten, Connie; Spiegel, David. Psycho-Oncology, Nov2006, Vol. 15 Issue 11, p1014-1022, 9p, 2 charts Abstract: Women with breast cancer express the greatest need for counseling at the time of diagnosis and report that the intervention they want is to be able to speak with someone who has the same cancer, but has lived through the crisis of treatment and is leading a ‘normal’ life. We conducted an observational study of a 6-month peer-counseling intervention testing outcomes for both newly diagnosed women (Sojourners) and peer counselors (Navigators) as a first step toward the goal of validating a peer navigator program. Significant improvement in the Sojourners was observed in trauma symptoms, emotional well-being, cancer self-efficacy, and desire for information on breast cancer resources. Navigators maintained baseline levels of the outcome variables, but increased in dissatisfaction with their interactions with their medical team and increased emotional suppression. Our findings indicate that peer navigation may halt a decline in quality of life that is commonly found in the first year following breast cancer diagnosis. In addition, Navigators were not adversely affected by their experience; however, careful training and supervision of Navigators is crucial to overall success. Randomized clinical trials are needed to demonstrate the efficacy of peer navigator programs. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/pon.1037 (AN 24435418)
    EBSCOhost

    The effects of nicotine gum and counseling among African American light smokers: a 2 × 2 factorial design. By: Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; Okuyemi, Kolawole; Nollen, Nicole; Choi, Won S.; Kaur, Harsohena; Pulvers, Kim; Mayo, Matthew S.. Addiction, Jun2006, Vol. 101 Issue 6, p883-891, 9p, 4 charts, 1 diagram Abstract: Aim Approximately 50% of African American smokers are light smokers (smoke ≤ 10 cigarettes a day). The prevalence of light smoking in the United States is increasing, yet there has not been a single smoking cessation clinical trial targeting light smokers. The purpose of this 2 × 2 factorial, randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the efficacy of nicotine gum (2 mg versus placebo) and counseling (motivational interviewing versus health education) for African American light smokers. Design Participants were assigned randomly to one of four study arms: 2 mg nicotine gum plus health education (HE); 2 mg nicotine gum plus motivational interviewing (MI); placebo gum plus HE; and placebo gum plus MI. Participants and setting A total of 755 African American light smokers (66% female, mean age = 45) were enrolled at a community health center over a 16-month period. Intervention and measurements Participants received an 8-week supply of nicotine gum and six counseling sessions during the course of the 26-week study. Biochemical measures included expired carbon monoxide (CO) and serum and salivary cotinine. Findings Seven-day quit rates for nicotine gum were no better than for the placebo group (14.2% versus 11.1%, P = 0.232) at 6 months. However, a counseling effect emerged, with HE performing significantly better than MI (16.7% versus 8.5%, P < 0.001). These results were consistent across outcome time-points (weeks 1, 8, and 26). Conclusions Results highlight the potential positive impact of directive information and advice-oriented counseling on smoking cessation. Studies are needed to assess other interventions that may further improve quit rates among African American light smokers who are motivated to quit. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01461.x (AN 20857130)
    EBSCOhost

    PSYCHOSOCIAL ONCOLOGY: GAINS AND LOSSES. By: Hendrick, Susan; Hershberger, Amy; Cortez-Garland, Monica; Fleshman, Sharon; Hutcherson, Suzy; Rozycki, Alicia. Journal of Loss & Trauma, Mar/Apr2006, Vol. 11 Issue 2, p115-130, 16p Abstract: The current article offers an overview of the development of a psychosocial counseling component in a complex outpatient and inpatient oncology treatment setting. Central to the article are the descriptions of the relationships that exist before, during, and after the transitioning of the psychosocial team into the larger treatment team. Also significant are gains and losses in our learning to handle touch, confidentiality, and related issues in a medical rather than a psychotherapy setting. Members of the psychosocial team speak in their own words about the experience of becoming part of this overall effort to treat holistically the oncology patient and her or his family. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/15325020500409184 (AN 19511240)
    EBSCOhost

    Decision Counseling in Cancer Prevention and Control. Myers, Ronald E.; Health Psychology, Vol 24(4, Suppl), Jul 2005. Special issue: Basic and Applied Decision Making in Cancer Control. pp. S71-S77. [Journal Article] Abstract: Informed and shared decision making are hallmarks of quality medical care. Although decision aids (e.g., brochures, decision boards, videos, interactive computer programs) can impart useful information, there is a dearth of work on theory-based approaches that help people clarify preferences and select a favored alternative. Decision counseling is a novel method that has been developed to address this need. In a decision counseling session, provider and patient identify personal values associated with decision alternatives, weigh the influence of relevant factors, clarify preference, and select an option from available alternatives. Decision counseling is described here in relation to 3 decision-making situations (i.e., having cancer screening, being tested for cancer risk, and joining a cancer chemoprevention trial). Preliminary findings suggest that decision counseling can help to clarify personal preferences related to health behavior choices and, thus, facilitate achievement of the ideals of informed and shared decision making. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)
    EBSCOhost

    Counseling the Client With Prostate Cancer. By: Curtis, Russell C.; Juhnke, Gerald A.. Journal of Counseling & Development, Spring2003, Vol. 81 Issue 2, p160, 8p; Abstract: The article focuses on counseling for the client suffering from prostate cancer. The typical prostate cancer diagnosis comes at a critical time in men's lives and will affect them differently depending on a number of variables. The stressors presently being faced, how they have coped with past crises, the strength of their social support network, and the degree to which they have adjusted to retirement and accepted their own mortality affect how men manage the stress of a cancer diagnosis and the rigors associated with its treatment. Clients with prostate cancer experience physical, emotional, and social problems. Counselors can help by becoming familiar with both the developmental issues faced by men at this stage, of their lives and the problems commonly associated with prostate cancer and its treatment. Helping clients to better comprehend and manage their illness through informational and emotional support and combining this with exercises geared toward finding meaning in their lives will ultimately help them cope with the physical, social and developmental issues affected by this disease. (AN 9725202)
    EBSCOhost

    A Randomized Trial of Breast Cancer Risk Counseling: The Impact on Self-Reported Mammography Use. By: Schwartz, Marc D.; Rimer, Barbara K.; Daly, Mary; Sands, Colleen; Lerman, Caryn. American Journal of Public Health, Jun99, Vol. 89 Issue 6, p924-926, 3p, 1 chart, 1 graph Abstract: Objectives. We evaluated the impact of individualized breast cancer risk counseling on mammography use among women at risk for breast cancer. Methods. Participants (n = 508) were randomized to the breast cancer risk counseling intervention or a general health education control intervention, and 85% completed follow-up. Results. In multivariate modeling, a significant group-by-education interaction demonstrated that among less-educated participants, breast, cancer risk counseling led to reduced mammography use. There was no intervention effect among the more-educated participants. Conclusions. These results suggest that standard breast cancer risk counseling could have an adverse impact on the health behaviors of less-educated women. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 1907223)
    EBSCOhost

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo

  3. #3
    Partecipante Affezionato L'avatar di Glendaks
    Data registrazione
    08-05-2006
    Messaggi
    60

    Riferimento: Tesi sul counseling oncologico


    Grazie Mille!!! Sicuramente mi daranno spunti interessanti!!!
    Ovviamente accetto anche suggerimenti in italiano!!!

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