• Opsonline.it
  • Facebook
  • twitter
  • youtube
  • linkedin
Visualizzazione risultati 1 fino 3 di 3
  1. #1
    Postatore Compulsivo L'avatar di Naracauli
    Data registrazione
    13-01-2005
    Messaggi
    3,012
    Blog Entries
    2

    Tesi In Psicologia Dell'emergenza

    ciao a tutti..... qualcuno sa dirmi dove posso trovare materiale per una tesi sui comportamenti prosociali durante un'emergenza e sui terremoti??

    in particolari mi hanno detto che ci sono diversi tipi di comportamento prosociale, voi sapete qualcosa??

    grazie!!
    Pericolosa è la donna che ti seduce con il corpo ... ma letale è colei che riesce a farlo con la mente ...

  2. #2
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: Tesi In Psicologia Dell'emergenza

    Ciao Gemma. Prova a vedere questi articoli:

    Role of donor competence, donor age, and peer presence on helping in an emergency. Peterson, Lizette; Developmental Psychology, Vol 19(6), Nov 1983. pp. 873-880. [Journal Article] Abstract: 101 1st, 4th, and 6th graders were interrupted by the experimenter as they played a gambling game. Half the Ss believed they were playing in the presence of an unseen peer bystander; half believed there were no bystanders present. Similarly, half the Ss had received competency instructions regarding how to repair the game should it become stuck, and half heard no such instructions. The experimenter asked Ss to wait for her until she returned. During her absence an unseen, same-sex peer played with the game and emitted distress cues. Results indicate that older Ss helped more than younger ones, Ss helped more when alone than with a peer, and Ss helped more when they had received competency instructions. Interactions reported in past research of peer presence with age were not obtained; peer presence and competence influenced all ages similarly. Competence and peer pressure interacted; competence had a much greater impact on lone Ss than on Ss with a peer present. (26 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)
    Role of donor competence, donor age, and peer presence on helping in an emergency. Peterson, Lizette; Developmental Psychology, Vol 19(6), Nov 1983. pp. 873-880. [Journal Article] Abstract: 101 1st, 4th, and 6th graders were interrupted by the experimenter as they played a gambling game. Half the Ss believed they were playing in the presence of an unseen peer bystander; half believed there were no bystanders present. Similarly, half the Ss had received competency instructions regarding how to repair the game should it become stuck, and half heard no such instructions. The experimenter asked Ss to wait for her until she returned. During her absence an unseen, same-sex peer played with the game and emitted distress cues. Results indicate that older Ss helped more than younger ones, Ss helped more when alone than with a peer, and Ss helped more when they had received competency instructions. Interactions reported in past research of peer presence with age were not obtained; peer presence and competence influenced all ages similarly. Competence and peer pressure interacted; competence had a much greater impact on lone Ss than on Ss with a peer present. (26 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)
    Role of donor competence, donor age, and peer presence on helping in an emergency. Peterson, Lizette; Developmental Psychology, Vol 19(6), Nov 1983. pp. 873-880. [Journal Article] Abstract: 101 1st, 4th, and 6th graders were interrupted by the experimenter as they played a gambling game. Half the Ss believed they were playing in the presence of an unseen peer bystander; half believed there were no bystanders present. Similarly, half the Ss had received competency instructions regarding how to repair the game should it become stuck, and half heard no such instructions. The experimenter asked Ss to wait for her until she returned. During her absence an unseen, same-sex peer played with the game and emitted distress cues. Results indicate that older Ss helped more than younger ones, Ss helped more when alone than with a peer, and Ss helped more when they had received competency instructions. Interactions reported in past research of peer presence with age were not obtained; peer presence and competence influenced all ages similarly. Competence and peer pressure interacted; competence had a much greater impact on lone Ss than on Ss with a peer present. (26 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)
    EBSCOhost

    The Heroism of Women and Men. Becker, Selwyn W.; Eagly, Alice H.; American Psychologist, Vol 59(3), Apr 2004. pp. 163-178. [Journal Article] Abstract: Heroism consists of actions undertaken to help others, despite the possibility that they may result in the helper's death or injury. The authors examine heroism by women and men in 2 extremely dangerous settings: the emergency situations in which Carnegie medalists rescued others and the holocaust in which some non-Jews risked their lives to rescue Jews. The authors also consider 3 risky but less dangerous prosocial actions: living kidney donations, volunteering for the Peace Corps, and volunteering for Doctors of the World. Although the Carnegie medalists were disproportionately men, the other actions yielded representations of women that were at least equal to and in most cases higher than those of men. These findings have important implications for the psychology of heroism and of gender. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)
    EBSCOhost

    Motivation, model attributes, and prosocial behavior. Wilson, John P.; Petruska, Richard; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol 46(2), Feb 1984. pp. 458-468. [Journal Article] Abstract: Examined the personality and situational effects that influence prosocial behavior. 112 safety- and esteem-oriented (as measured by a sentence-completion test) undergraduates were exposed to an emergency situation wherein the experimenter was ostensibly injured by an "explosion." Results indicate that there were significant situational and personality determinants of helping and imitative behavior. Overall, there was more help when Ss were interacting with an active vs a passive model. Esteem-oriented Ss were more likely to initiate helping behavior and were more strongly influenced by high-competence models. In contrast, safety-oriented Ss helped less overall and were more influenced by high-status models. Results are discussed in terms of a Person × Situation paradigm of prosocial behaviors. (32 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)
    EBSCOhost


    The development and maturation of humanitarian psychology. Jacobs, Gerard A.; American Psychologist, Vol 62(8), Nov 2007. pp. 932-941. [Journal Article] Abstract: Humanitarian psychological support as an organized field is relatively young. Pioneers in the field were involved primarily in providing psychological support to refugees and internally displaced persons in conflict and nonconflict situations. This article describes basic principles for the design of psychological support programs and interventions. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) began a psychological support program in 1991. The IFRC chose psychological first aid as its model for implementation in developing countries. Psychological first aid fits all the principles for psychological support program design and is adapted to individual communities. The first generation of psychological support programs differed dramatically depending on the countries in which they were developed. A second generation of psychological support programs evolved in response to the earthquake/tsunami of December 26, 2004. The Inter-Agency Standing Committee international guidelines consolidated the advances of second-generation programs and provided a clear indication of the wide acceptance of the importance of psychological support. A glimpse is provided of the third generation of psychological support programs, and an admonition is made for a more empirical evaluation of the effectiveness of interventions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)
    EBSCOhost

    Theory, training and timing: Psychosocial interventions in complex emergencies. By: Yule, William. International Review of Psychiatry, Jun2006, Vol. 18 Issue 3, p259-264, 6p Abstract: The Asian tsunami of December 2004 galvanised mental health and emergency agencies in a way that no other recent disaster has done. The loss of life and forced migration focused national and international agencies on the need to provide appropriate psychosocial care from the very beginning. The prior academic arguments surrounding early intervention paled into insignificance against the urgent need to reduce distress and prevent chronic mental health problems. This chapter notes that there was a major, planned and early intervention following the earthquake in Bam, exactly one year earlier. The lessons from that are only now beginning to filter through and help shape better responses to disasters. It is argued that too many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and even IGOs are following theoretical positions that have little empirical justification. There is an urgent need for training for mental health and NGO personnel alike to deliver evidence-based psychological first aid. There is no justification for mental health responses to be delayed until weeks after a disaster happens. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/09540260600656134 (AN 21055714)


    Sulle teorie del comportamento prosociale:

    A social-cognitive model of trait and state levels of gratitude. Wood, Alex M.; Maltby, John; Stewart, Neil; Emotion, Vol 8(2), Apr 2008. pp. 281-290. [Journal Article] Abstract: Three studies tested a new model of gratitude, which specified the generative mechanisms linking individual differences (trait gratitude) and objective situations with the amount of gratitude people experience after receiving aid (state gratitude). In Study 1, all participants (N = 253) read identical vignettes describing a situation in which they received help. People higher in trait gratitude made more positive beneficial appraisals (seeing the help as more valuable, more costly to provide, and more altruistically intended), which fully mediated the relationship between trait and state levels of gratitude. Study 2 (N = 113) replicated the findings using a daily process study in which participants reported on real events each day for up to14 days. In Study 3, participants (N = 200) read vignettes experimentally manipulating objective situations to be either high or low in benefit. Benefit appraisals were shown to have a causal effect on state gratitude and to mediate the relationship between different prosocial situations and state gratitude. The 3 studies demonstrate the critical role of benefit appraisals in linking state gratitude with trait gratitude and the objective situation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)EBSCOhost

    Developmental Differences in Prosocial Motives and Behavior in Children From Low-Socioeconomic Status Families. By: McGrath, Marianne P.; Brown, Bethany C.. Journal of Genetic Psychology, Mar2008, Vol. 169 Issue 1, p5-20, 16p, 1 chart, 1 graph Abstract: Developmental theories of prosocial reasoning and behavior posit a transition from concrete (e.g., give a toy to receive one) to abstract (e.g., spend time to make someone happy) forms and have been supported with research on middle-socioeconomic status (SES), White samples. The methodology that researchers have used to date has restricted the responses that children can offer. In the present study, 122 Grade 2 and Grade 4 children from low-SES families described different types of motives and behavior and whether a conflict existed between self- and other-serving behaviors. The authors found developmental differences for both abstract and tangible motives that focused on the benefactor of prosocial behavior. Grade 2 girls and Grade 4 boys were the most likely to spontaneously describe a conflict between self- and other-serving behaviors. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 31594845)

    Dynamics of self-regulation: How (un)accomplished goal actions affect motivation. Koo, Minjung; Fishbach, Ayelet; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol 94(2), Feb 2008. pp. 183-195. [Journal Article] Abstract: Two factors increase the motivation to adhere to a goal: goal commitment and lack of goal progress. When people ask about commitment, focusing on what they have accomplished (to date) signals to them high commitment and increases motivation. Conversely, when commitment is certain and people ask about goal progress, focusing on what they have yet to accomplish (to go) signals to them lack of progress and increases motivation. Accordingly, 4 studies show that emphasizing to-date information increases goal adherence when commitment is uncertain--that is, when participants study for a relatively unimportant exam, consume luxuries, fulfill a desire, and make first-time contributions to a charity. Conversely, emphasizing to-go information increases goal adherence when commitment is certain--that is, when participants study for an important exam, consume necessities, fulfill a need, and make repeated contributions to a charity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

    EMOTION AND TRANSFORMATION IN THE RELATIONAL SPIRITUALITY PARADIGM PART 2. IMPLICIT MORALITY AND "MINIMAL PROSOCIALITY". By: Leffel, G. Michael. Journal of Psychology & Theology, Winter2007, Vol. 35 Issue 4, p281-297, 17p; Abstract: The article discusses the meaning of reductive transformational change in the light of latest thinking on the multiple therapeutic actions of psychodynamicaly informed therapy in the U.S. It recommends the systematic comprehension of principle and type of alteration into models of spiritual formation related with moral character development. It also provides an overview of a particular motive approach. (AN 31380752)

    The effects of moral judgment and moral identity on moral behavior: An empirical examination of the moral individual. Reynolds, Scott J.; Ceranic, Tara L.; Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol 92(6), Nov 2007. pp. 1610-1624. [Journal Article] Abstract: Recognizing limitations in classic cognitive moral development theory, several scholars have drawn from theories of identity to suggest that moral behavior results from both moral judgments and moral identity. The authors conducted 2 survey-based studies with more than 500 students and managers to test this argument. Results demonstrated that moral identity and moral judgments both independently influenced moral behavior. In addition, in situations in which social consensus regarding the moral behavior was not high, moral judgments and moral identity interacted to shape moral behavior. This interaction effect indicated that those who viewed themselves as moral individuals pursued the most extreme alternatives (e.g., never cheating, regularly cheating)--a finding that affirms the motivational power of a moral identity. The authors conclude by considering the implications of this research for both theory and practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    From social talk to social action: Shaping the social triad with emotion sharing. Peters, Kim; Kashima, Yoshihisa; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol 93(5), Nov 2007. pp. 780-797. [Journal Article] Abstract: Seemingly trivial social talk provides fertile ground for emotion sharing (a narrator and audience's realization that they experience the same emotional response toward a target), which in turn creates a coalition between the narrator and the audience, configures the narrator and audience's relationship with the target, and coordinates their target-directed action. In this article, the authors use 4 studies to investigate this thesis. In Studies 1 and 2--where participants rated scenarios in which narrators told them anecdotes--the authors found that when there was emotion sharing (a) participants were more bonded with narrators, (b) the narrator and audience's relationship with the target (as reflected in action tendencies) was determined by the emotionality of the anecdotes, and (c) they coordinated their target-directed actions. Study 3 demonstrated that this effect was indeed due to emotion sharing. Study 4 provided behavioral evidence for the effects of emotion sharing using a 2-person trust game. Together, these studies reveal that the everyday act of social talk is a powerful act that is able to shape the social triad of the narrator, the audience, and the social target, with powerful consequences for social structure and group action. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Moral personality of brave and caring exemplars. Walker, Lawrence J.; Frimer, Jeremy A.; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol 93(5), Nov 2007. pp. 845-860. [Journal Article] Abstract: Two contrasting types of moral exemplars were examined so as to identify personality variables associated with moral action. The sample comprised 50 Canadian awardees for either exceptional bravery or caring, as well as 50 comparison participants. Participants responded to a set of personality questionnaires and a life-review interview. Personality variables were found to substantially augment moral cognition in the prediction of exemplary action. In support of the notion that there is a personological core to the moral domain, it was found that moral exemplars were distinguished from the comparison groups by themes embodied in their life narratives. Specifically, moral exemplars had stronger motivational themes of both agency and communion, were more likely to construe critical life events redemptively, more frequently identified helpers in early life, and reported more secure attachments. Furthermore, the personality of caring exemplars was more nurturant, generative, and optimistic than that of brave exemplars; these somewhat divergent personality profiles imply multiple ideals of moral maturity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Ultima modifica di willy61 : 03-07-2008 alle ore 12.12.11

  3. #3
    Postatore Compulsivo L'avatar di Naracauli
    Data registrazione
    13-01-2005
    Messaggi
    3,012
    Blog Entries
    2

    Riferimento: Tesi In Psicologia Dell'emergenza

    grazie mille!!! sei stato gentilissimo ... ora vedo quale è più attinente per il mio lavoro!!


    Pericolosa è la donna che ti seduce con il corpo ... ma letale è colei che riesce a farlo con la mente ...

Privacy Policy