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  1. #1
    Neofita L'avatar di aurorinath
    Data registrazione
    03-07-2007
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    9

    Psicologia della sicurezza

    Ciao!
    Qualcuno ha del materiale sulla psicologia della sicurezza? Sto scrivendo una tesi sull'argomento ma non trovo niente.
    Grazie mille

  2. #2
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
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    Albino (BG)
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    4,192
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    Riferimento: Psicologia della sicurezza

    Safety in work vehicles: A multilevel study linking safety values and individual predictors to work-related driving crashes. Newnam, Sharon; Griffin, Mark A.; Mason, Claire; Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol 93(3), May 2008. pp. 632-644. [Journal Article] Abstract: Although work-related driving is associated with high accident rates, limited research has investigated the factors influencing driving crashes in the work setting. This study explored multilevel influences on self-reported crashes in the workplace by surveying a sample of work-related drivers (n = 380), their workgroup supervisors (n = 88), and fleet managers (n = 47). At the driver level of analysis, safety motivation predicted self-reported crashes. In turn, drivers' perceptions of their fleet managers' safety values (but not drivers' perceptions of their supervisors' safety values), their own attitudes, and their own efficacy beliefs predicted motivation to drive safely. Furthermore, the influence of supervisors and fleet managers interacted such that drivers were more motivated to drive safely if they perceived both their supervisor and fleet manager to value safety. This study also explored the cross-level relationships between supervisors' and fleet managers' perceptions of organizational safety values and drivers' perceptions of managerial safety values and found a relationship between fleet managers' perceptions of organizational safety values and drivers' perceptions of fleet managers' safety values. These results illustrate that perceptions of workplace safety values are transmitted across levels of the organization. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)
    Cited References (72)

    The moderating effects of task complexity on the relationship between regulatory foci and safety and production performance. Wallace, J. Craig; Little, Laura M.; Shull, Amanda; Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Vol 13(2), Apr 2008. pp. 95-104. [Journal Article] Abstract: Regulatory foci of promotion and prevention have been shown to relate differentially to occupational safety and production. This research proposes that task complexity can help explain the differences reported between these 2 self-regulatory processes and safety and productivity performance. Results revealed that promotion is positively related to production and prevention is positively related to safety regardless of task complexity. However, when task complexity is high, promotion negatively relates to safety and prevention negatively relates production. Implications for work motivation theory and research, as well as avenues for future research, are discussed. Practical implications for managerial interventions to optimize both safety and productivity are also presented. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

    'A preliminary evaluation of SOLVE: Addressing psychosocial problems at work': Correction to Probst et al. (2008). Probst, Tahira M.; Gold, David; Caborn, Joannah; Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Vol 13(2), Apr 2008. pp. 167. [Erratum/Correction] Correction to: A preliminary evaluation of SOLVE: Addressing psychosocial problems at work Abstract: Reports an error in "A preliminary evaluation of SOLVE: Addressing psychosocial problems at work" by Tahira M. Probst, David Gold and Joannah Caborn (Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 2008[Jan], Vol 13[1], 32-42). In the aforementioned article, the copyright attribution is incorrect. The article is in the public domain. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2008-00533-004.) The International Labour Organization (ILO) has developed a workplace intervention known as SOLVE, aimed at reducing the incidence of psychosocial problems related to job stress, workplace violence, tobacco use, drug and alcohol abuse, and HIV/AIDS. Although this ILO intervention is widely implemented, this article reports the first attempt to empirically assess its effectiveness. Using pre- and posttests of knowledge related to the course content gathered from 268 individuals in 7 countries who attended 1 of 15 SOLVE courses, analyses show that participant learning significantly improved as a function of attending the training. Knowledge gains were consistent regardless of course attended, language used to deliver the training program, and country in which the training took place. Implications of the SOLVE program are discussed, and future steps for further intervention development and assessment are recommended. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

    Intervention effectiveness evaluation criteria: Promoting competitions and raising the bar. Scharf, Ted; Chapman, Larry; Collins, Jim; Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Vol 13(1), Jan 2008. pp. 1-9. [Journal Article] Abstract: The Intervention Evaluation Competition at the Work, Stress, and Health conference in Miami (March 2006) highlighted the importance of intervention evaluation studies that promote safety and health at work. A retitled, "Best Practices Evaluation Competition," has been included in the March, 2008, Work, Stress, and Health conference, in Washington, DC. This brief note describes the development of the criteria used to evaluate the manuscripts. The criteria are discussed with respect to (a) improving the science of evaluation methodology, (b) promoting the highest ethical standards in intervention evaluation, and (c) using the current criteria as a starting point for continuing to raise the bar for evaluation methodology. The policy implications of the evaluation criteria are discussed as well. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

    A preliminary evaluation of SOLVE: Addressing psychosocial problems at work. Probst, Tahira M.; Gold, David; Caborn, Joannah; Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Vol 13(1), Jan 2008. pp. 32-42. [Journal Article] Correction to: [Related Item] Abstract: [Correction Notice: An erratum for this article was reported in Vol 13(2) of Journal of Occupational Health Psychology (see record 2008-03497-009). In the aforementioned article, the copyright attribution is incorrect. The article is in the public domain.] The International Labour Organization (ILO) has developed a workplace intervention known as SOLVE, aimed at reducing the incidence of psychosocial problems related to job stress, workplace violence, tobacco use, drug and alcohol abuse, and HIV/AIDS. Although this ILO intervention is widely implemented, this article reports the first attempt to empirically assess its effectiveness. Using pre- and posttests of knowledge related to the course content gathered from 268 individuals in 7 countries who attended 1 of 15 SOLVE courses, analyses show that participant learning significantly improved as a function of attending the training. Knowledge gains were consistent regardless of course attended, language used to deliver the training program, and country in which the training took place. Implications of the SOLVE program are discussed, and future steps for further intervention development and assessment are recommended. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)


    Work characteristics, musculoskeletal disorders, and the mediating role of psychological strain: A study of call center employees. Sprigg, Christine A.; Stride, Christopher B.; Wall, Toby D.; Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol 92(5), Sep 2007. pp. 1456-1466. [Journal Article] Abstract: The demands of the modern office are thought to contribute to the development of musculoskeletal disorders. For upper body and lower back disorders, these effects are hypothesized to be mediated by psychological strain. A study of 936 employees from 22 call centers supports this hypothesis. Using logistic regression and structural equation modeling, the authors found that the relationship of workload to upper body and lower back musculoskeletal disorders was largely accounted for by job-related strain. This mediating effect was less evident for arm disorders. Contrary to expectation, job autonomy had neither a direct nor a moderating effect on any musculoskeletal disorder. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Developing and testing a theoretical model linking work-family conflict to employee safety. Cullen, Jennifer C.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Vol 12(3), Jul 2007. pp. 266-278. [Journal Article] Abstract: Despite work-family conflict being recognized as a source of stress, no published research to our knowledge has considered how it negatively affects workplace safety. A theoretical model linking strain-based work-family conflict and employee safety was tested with 243 health care workers. Within this model, work-family conflict is conceptualized as a workplace hazard. As expected, strong work performance norms and high work overload were associated with higher work-family conflict; increased family-to-work conflict was associated with decreased compliance with safety rules and less willingness to participate in discretionary safety meetings. Work-to-family conflict, however, was not associated with safety. These findings underscore the importance of work redesign strategies that consider work performance norms and work-family conflict for expecting a return on investment in terms of a safer workplace. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    The role of work habits in the motivation of food safety behaviors. Hinsz, Verlin B.; Nickell, Gary S.; Park, Ernest S.; Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, Vol 13(2), Jun 2007. pp. 105-114. [Journal Article] Abstract: The authors considered work habits within an integrated framework of motivated behavior. A distinction made between automatic and controlled action led to 2 measures of work habits: a habit strength measure reflecting the 4 characteristics of automaticity and a measure of work routines under conscious control. Workers at a turkey processing plant (N = 162) responded to an extensive survey of these work habits measures with regard to food safety. Results indicated that attitudes and subjective norms predicted food safety intentions. These intentions, along with perceived behavior control and work habits, predicted reports of food safety behaviors. A mediation analysis indicated that the work routines measure accounted for the variance in self-reported behavior and mediated any effect of the habit strength measure. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Self-assessed occupational health and working environment of female nurses, cabin crew and teachers. By: Sveinsdóttir, Herdis; Gunnarsdóttir, Hólmfríður; Friðriksdóttir, Hildur. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, Jun2007, Vol. 21 Issue 2, p262-273, 12p, 5 charts Abstract: Aim: The aim of this study was to describe and compare the self-assessed occupational health among female nurses, cabin crew and teachers, in relation to their working environment. Background: Similarities between the three occupations, i.e. predominantly female and service-oriented, render them interesting in comparison with respect to health and working environment. Methods: The participants were female Icelandic cabin crew, nurses and elementary school teachers. A questionnaire including items on socio-demographics, working environment (addressing work pace, job security, monotonous work, assistance, physically strenuous work and physical environmental factors) and a symptom list was used for data collection. Factor analyses on the symptom list resulted in five symptom scales: Musculoskeletal, Stress and exhaustion, Common cold, Gastrointestinal and Sound perception scale. A total of 1571 questionnaires were distributed. The response rate was 65.7–69%, depending on occupation. Data were collected in 2002. Results: Cabin crew reported worse gastrointestinal, sound perception and common cold symptoms than nurses and teachers. Cabin crew and teachers reported worse symptoms of stress and exhaustion than nurses (p < 0.05). When compared with teachers and nurses cabin crew reported less job security and more physically strenuous and monotonous work. Nurses were likelier to seek assistance from co-workers or patients as well as to take care of an older relative than teachers and cabin crew. Regression analysis found that within each occupation distress from environmental factors resulted in higher score on all the symptom scales. Conclusions: Nurses experience less stress and exhaustion than teachers and cabin crew. In comparison with one or both of the other occupations nurses are more likely to assist each other with their work, experience job security, reporting physically complex work and take care of older relatives. This should be highlighted... [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2007.00465.x (AN 25276135)

    Promoting Sun Safety Among US Postal Service Letter Carriers: Impact of a 2-Year Intervention. By: Maye, Joni A.; Elder, John P.; Slymen, Donald J.; Clapp, Elizabeth J.; Pichon, Latrice C.; Eckhardt, Laura; Achter, April; Balderrama, Cynthia; Galindo, Gabriel R.; Oh, Sam S.; Eichenfield, Lawrence F.; Sallis, James F.; Weinstock, Martin A.. American Journal of Public Health, Mar2007, Vol. 97 Issue 3, p559-565, 7p, 2 charts, 1 diagram, 1 graph Abstract: Objectives. We examined whether US Postal Service letter carriers who received a sun safety intervention would wear wide-brim hats and sunscreen significantly more often than those who did not receive the intervention. Methods. We used a 2-group randomized design with 2662 evaluation cohort participants from 70 US postal stations. Evaluations were conducted at baseline, 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years. Questionnaire items assessed occupational use of sunscreen and wide-brim hats. The 2-year sun safety intervention included the provision of wide-brim hats, accessible sunscreen, reminders, and 6 educational sessions. Results. At the 3-month follow-up evaluations, the odds ratio (OR) for regular sunscreen use was 2.8 times higher among the intervention group than among the control group (95% confidence interval [CI]=2.2, 3.5); at the 2-year follow-up evaluations, the rate was still significantly higher (OR = 2.0; 95% CI= 1.6, 2.6). Intervention group participants also had significantly higher rates of hat use, with the differences remaining consistent across all follow-ups (OR=2.9; 95% CI =2.3, 3.6). Conclusions. The intervention should be disseminated to postal stations nationwide and possibly to other occupational groups that Work outdoors. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2005.083907 (AN 24347134)

    Aviation on the Ground: Safety Culture in a Ground Handling Company. By: Ek, Åsa; Akselsson, Roland. International Journal of Aviation Psychology, 2007, Vol. 17 Issue 1, p59-76, 18p, 3 charts, 1 graph Abstract: Ground handling work performance is an important part of the civil aviation flight cycle. Well-functioning safety management for minimizing the risk for accidents is vital and dependent on the safety culture. This article reports on a safety culture assessment of a ground handling company using a multiplex approach method. The study is included in the establishment of reference data concerning safety culture aspects in different transport branches. The results of the assessment reveal a generally good existing safety culture. However, the safety culture is somewhat poorer than that estimated and desired by the managers and that in other transport branches. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1207/s15327108ijap1701_4 (AN 23752108)

    Changes at work and employee reactions: Organizational elements, job insecurity, and short-term stress as predictors for employee health and safety. By: STØRSETH, FRED. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, Dec2006, Vol. 47 Issue 6, p541-550, 10p, 2 charts, 4 diagrams Abstract: The objective was to identify focus areas for possible reduction of job insecurity and its outcomes. A model was specified and tested as a prediction model for health and safety. First, a parsimonious model was specified. The model consisted of perceived job insecurity (as a stressor), organizational factors (information quality, leadership style, work task administration), and short-term stress reactions (job dissatisfaction, reduced work motivation). Second, the model was tested as a prediction model in three separate path analyses, in order to examine the model's contribution in explaining (1) physical health complaints, (2) mental health complaints, and (3) risk taking behavior. A quota sample of Norwegian employees ( N= 1,002) was obtained by means of a self-completion questionnaire survey. The results of the structural equation modeling (path analyses) supported the hypothesized model. Mental health complaints and employee risk taking behavior were significantly predicted (not physical health complaints). [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9450.2006.00548.x (AN 23092717)

    Safety Climate as a Mediator Between Foundation Climates and Occupational Accidents: A Group-Level Investigation. Wallace, J. Craig; Popp, Eric; Mondore, Scott; Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol 91(3), May 2006. pp. 681-688. [Journal Article] Abstract: Building on recent work in occupational safety and climate, the authors examined 2 organizational foundation climates thought to be antecedents of specific safety climate and the relationships among these climates and occupational accidents. It is believed that both foundation climates (i.e., management-employee relations and organizational support) will predict safety climate, which will in turn mediate the relationship between occupational accidents and these 2 distal foundation climates. Using a sample of 9,429 transportation workers in 253 work groups, the authors tested the proposed relationships at the group level. Results supported all hypotheses. Overall it appears that different climates have direct and indirect effects on occupational accidents. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Female Street Sex Workers in Hong Kong: Moving beyond Sexual Health. By: Wong, William C.W.; Holroyd, Eleanor A.; Gray, Ann; Ling, Davina C.. Journal of Women's Health (15409996), May2006, Vol. 15 Issue 4, p390-399, 10p, 5 charts Abstract: Background: For many years, the sex industry in Hong Kong has appeared to be an integral and ever-expanding component of the city's sociocultural and economic structure. Accordingly, the physical and psychological health of sex workers is becoming an increasing concern for the workers themselves, the public, and government policy. Methods: A cross-sectional survey on the quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life [WHOQOL]) of female sex workers (FSWs) in Hong Kong was used to investigate the physical and psychological well-being of street FSWs, and the results were compared with those of nonsex-working Hong Kong women after adjusting for age, educational level, marital status, and health status. Results: The 89 FSWs surveyed scored significantly lower on QOL—WHOQOL-BREF (HK)—measures compared with the nonsex-working women. One common aspect among these sex workers was their negative view of themselves and of life. Many sex workers were at risk of being abused while at work, and many women worked without legal protection. Most of the women surveyed engaged in sex work to support their families. Because their income was often insufficient, some of their needs, especially those concerning health, were often neglected. Conclusions: The low WHOQOL-BREF (HK) scores in FSWs indicate feelings of helplessness and entrapment, which may well result in detrimental effects on sex workers' health, self-esteem, and confidence when asserting their basic rights, such as access to healthcare and safety. The conclusion highlights the vulnerability of this population to apparent weaknesses in Hong Kong's current healthcare system. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1089/jwh.2006.15.390 (AN 20932276)

    Work stress and patient safety: Observer-rated work stressors as predictors of characteristics of safety-related events reported by young nurses. By: Elfering, A.; Semmer, N. K.; Grebner, S.. Ergonomics, 4/15/2006, Vol. 49 Issue 5/6, p457-469, 13p, 4 charts Abstract: This study investigates the link between workplace stress and the ‘non-singularity’ of patient safety-related incidents in the hospital setting. Over a period of 2 working weeks 23 young nurses from 19 hospitals in Switzerland documented 314 daily stressful events using a self-observation method (pocket diaries); 62 events were related to patient safety. Familiarity of safety-related events and probability of recurrence, as indicators of non-singularity, were the dependent variables in multilevel regression analyses. Predictor variables were both situational (self-reported situational control, safety compliance) and chronic variables (job stressors such as time pressure, or concentration demands and job control). Chronic work characteristics were rated by trained observers. The most frequent safety-related stressful events included incomplete or incorrect documentation (40.3%), medication errors (near misses 21%), delays in delivery of patient care (9.7%), and violent patients (9.7%). Familiarity of events and probability of recurrence were significantly predicted by chronic job stressors and low job control in multilevel regression analyses. Job stressors and low job control were shown to be risk factors for patient safety. The results suggest that job redesign to enhance job control and decrease job stressors may be an important intervention to increase patient safety. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/00140130600568451 (AN 20917563)

    Social-Cognitive Determinants of Hoist Usage Among Health Care Workers. Rickett, Bridgette; Orbell, Sheina; Sheeran, Paschal; Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Vol 11(2), Apr 2006. pp. 182-196. [Journal Article] Abstract: Injuries caused by unsafe manual handling of patients are a major source of ill health in health care workers. The present study evaluated the ability of 4 classes of variable to predict use of a hoist when moving a heavily dependent patient. Variables examined were occupational role characteristics, such as hours of work and type of shift worked; biographics, including age and height; aspects of occupational context, such as number of hoists available and number of patients; and motivational variables specified by the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1985) and protection motivation theory (Rogers, 1983). Regression analyses showed that background and social-cognitive variables were able to account for 59% of variance in intention to use a hoist and 41% of variance in use of the hoist assessed 6 weeks later. Height, hoist availability, coworker injunctive norm, perceived behavioral control, response cost, response benefits, and social and physical costs of not using the hoist each explained independent variance in motivation to use a hoist at work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Psychosocial factors and safety behaviour as predictors of accidental work injuries in farming. By: Glasscock, David J.; Rasmussen, Kurt; Carstensen, Ole; Hansen, Ole N.. Work & Stress, Apr-Jun2006, Vol. 20 Issue 2, p173-189, 17p, 4 charts Abstract: Farming is one of the most hazardous occupations in terms of the incidence and seriousness of accidental injuries. Research with other occupational groups has drawn attention to the role of psychosocial factors and stress. Such research needs to be extended to agriculture. Since stress may be a problem faced by farmers, there is a particular need to investigate the associations between farm accidents and work stressors and stress reactions. Using multivariate logistic regression analyses, this study aimed to uncover the best psychosocial predictors of injury, while controlling for exposure-related confounders. From a randomly selected sample of 794 farms, 10% of all farms in Ringkoebing County, Denmark, 393 farmers completed completed weekly accident registration over 12 months. The study sample consisted of 310 farmers who also completed questionnaires on psychosocial factors. Results indicated that farm stressors (including perceived economic problems), stress symptoms, and safety behaviour were predictors of occupational farm accidents. Higher levels of stressors and stress symptoms and poor safety behaviour were all associated with an elevated risk of injury. In the case of stress symptoms, the relation with accidents occurred via an interaction with safety behaviour. The combination of high levels of stress symptoms and poor safety behaviour was associated with a particularly high accident risk. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/02678370600879724 (AN 22249358)

    A STUDY OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSES' BELIEFS AND ATTITUDES ABOUT WORK SAFETY AND ASSAULTS IN TURKEY. By: Bilgin, Hülya; Buzlu, Sevim. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, Jan2006, Vol. 27 Issue 1, p75-90, 16p Abstract: In Turkey, the cultural structure effects the gender roles in the society, and women are subject to violence in an intense manner both inside the family and in their workplaces. In nursing, which is still defined as a woman's job in our country, it is possible to encounter many aggressive and threatening behaviours. Knowing no geographical borders, aggression leads to dissatisfaction and alienation with the profession for the nurses working at the psychiatric institutions in Turkey, thus aggression is a significant health risk in physical, psychological and social dimensions. The research was carried out with 162 randomly selected nurses working in the psychiatric institutions in Istanbul using the Attitudes Toward Patient Physical Assault Questionnaire. It has been determined that nurses' rate of exposure to verbal/physical assault by the patients and their relatives is high and that they experience an intense uncertainty and conflict, especially in legal issues, and that the duration of working in the psychiatry clinics effects attitudes toward the assaults. It is concluded that the nurses working at the psychiatry clinics in Turkey are under risk in regards to safety and they need protection and support, both in emotional and in legal terms. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/01612840500312894 (AN 19114544)

    Buona vita

  3. #3

  4. #4
    Neofita L'avatar di aurorinath
    Data registrazione
    03-07-2007
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    Riferimento: Psicologia della sicurezza

    Grazie mille

  5. #5
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di jamostex
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    Re: Psicologia della sicurezza

    io ho fatto la tesi sulla sicurezza....se ho tempo uno di questi giorni vado a spulciarmi un po' di bibliografia (la mia è di 14 pagine) e ti dico...

    ...tu però specifica meglio l'argomento e se è sperimentale o meno....

  6. #6
    Neofita L'avatar di aurorinath
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    Riferimento: Psicologia della sicurezza

    Ciao!La tesi è sulla sicurezza lavorativa ed è sperimentale.
    Mi servirebbero però degli accenni alla psicologia della sicurezza in generale per parlarne in un capitolo.
    Grazie mille

  7. #7
    L'avatar di Duccio
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    Riferimento: Psicologia della sicurezza

    Di Andreoni e Marocci "Sicurezza e benessere nel lavoro" Ed. Psicologia, Roma
    Di Avallone e Paplomatas "Salute organizzativa", Cortina Milano
    Questi erano i due (dei 4 presenti ma quelli piu' sulla sicurezza) manuali per l'esame di Psicologia della sicurezza e del benessere nel lavoro che vengono utilizzati a Firenze.. Di altri non ne conosco

  8. #8
    Neofita L'avatar di aurorinath
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    Grazie mille Duccio!

  9. #9
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di jamostex
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    Riferimento: Psicologia della sicurezza

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da aurorinath Visualizza messaggio
    Ciao!La tesi è sulla sicurezza lavorativa ed è sperimentale.
    Mi servirebbero però degli accenni alla psicologia della sicurezza in generale per parlarne in un capitolo.
    ahhhhhh ora si che sei stata più specifica

    vabbè va....beccati questi intanto, fondamentali a mio modesto parere per iniziare a masticare cosa la psicologia può fare nel campo della sicurezza sul lavoro:

    Ambrosini M., (1996), Sicurezza sul lavoro, Psicologia e Lavoro, 100-101.
    Amovilli L., (1995), Modelli psicologici di ricerca e intervento nella sicurezza lavorativa, Personale e Lavoro, 388.
    Amovilli L., (2003), Scienze dell’intervento e cause degli infortuni, Risorsa Uomo, 2
    Andreoni P., (2006), Esperienze di intervento sulla sicurezza, Psicologia e Lavoro, 140.
    Argentero P., Zanaletti W., Dell'Olivo B., (2005), Percezione dei rischi occupazionali, formazione alla sicurezza e prevenzione degli infortuni, Risorsa Uomo, 11, 3.
    Bisio C., (2005), Il contributo della psicologia del lavoro e dell'organizzazione agli interventi nella prevenzione degli incidenti sul lavoro, Risorsa Uomo, 11, 3.
    Carli R., Paniccia R. M., Salvatore S., (1995), La dinamica del rischio e la sicurezza sul lavoro, in: La sicurezza sul lavoro (D. L. 626/94), Fondazione energia Edizioni.
    Cooper M. D., (1997), Evidence from safety culture that risk perception is culturally determined, The International Journal of Project and Business Risk Management, 1, 2.
    Cooper M. D., (2000), Towards a model of safety culture, Safety Science, 36.
    DeJoy D. M., (2005), Behaviour change versus culture change: divergent approaches to managing workplace safety, Safety Science, 43.
    Di Naro C., (2006), La problematica della sicurezza lavorativa nelle organizzazioni, Bollettino di Psicologia Applicata, 248.
    Geller E. S., (1999), Behavior-based safety: confusion, controversy, and clarification, Occupational Health and Safety, 68, 1.
    Gherardi S., Nicolini D., (2000), The organizational learning of safety in communities of practice, Journal of Management Inquiry, 9, 1.
    Gherardi S., Nicolini D., Odella F., (1998), What do you mean by safety? Conflicting perspectives on accident causation and safety management in a construction firm, Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 6, 4.
    Kaneklin C., Scaratti G., (2005), La formazione alla sicurezza: una sfida di senso e di efficacia, Risorsa Uomo, 3.
    Marocci G., (1993), Problemi e certezze in un intervento psicosociale di sicurezza lavorativa, Quaderni di Psicologia del Lavoro, Edizioni Psicologia, Roma, 2.
    Pidgeon N. F., (1997), The limits to safety? Culture, politics, learning and man-made disasters, Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 5, 1.
    Spaltro E., (2003), L’idea di sicurezza, Psicologia e Lavoro, 128.
    Zohar D., Luria G., (2005), A multilevel model of safety climate: cross-level relationships between organization and group-level climates, Journal of Applied Psychology, 90.

    ...c'è da dire che io sono di parte con un certo modo di intendere la sicurezza...

    per la letteratura scientifica straniera interessanti quasi tutti i numeri di:

    Safety Science
    Journal of Safety Research
    Journal of Applied Psychology

    che trovi nelle emeroteche virtuali tipo caspur ecc.

    Buon lavoro!

  10. #10
    L'avatar di Duccio
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    Riferimento: Psicologia della sicurezza

    Mi sa che per l'estate non hai problemi su libro da leggere sotto l'ombrellone ora...

  11. #11
    Neofita L'avatar di aurorinath
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    Riferimento: Psicologia della sicurezza

    Grazie mille....
    La mia difficoltà è trovare le riviste ma proverò a chiedere al Dipartimento.
    Grazie mille di nuovo

  12. #12
    Neofita L'avatar di aurorinath
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    Riferimento: Psicologia della sicurezza

    Ciao Jamostex!
    Scusa per il disturbo!
    Purtroppo sul motore di ricerca che uso io (PsychInfo), molti degli articoli che mi hai consigliato non sono presenti.
    Tu hai usato siti Internet o hai consultato direttamente le riviste in Università???
    Grazie mille
    Aurora

  13. #13
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di jamostex
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    Riferimento: Psicologia della sicurezza

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da aurorinath Visualizza messaggio
    Ciao Jamostex!
    Scusa per il disturbo!
    Purtroppo sul motore di ricerca che uso io (PsychInfo), molti degli articoli che mi hai consigliato non sono presenti.
    Tu hai usato siti Internet o hai consultato direttamente le riviste in Università???
    Grazie mille
    Aurora
    psychinfo per la psicologia del lavoro è scarso purtroppo...

    le riviste italiane (risorsa uomo, psicologia del lavoro, bollettino di psicologia applicata) o le avevo ordinate a lavoro dicendo che mi erano necessarie o le ho prese in biblioteca di facoltà (alla sapienza si trovano)

    quelle straniere che ti dicevo si trovano sui database dell'emeroteca virtuale (caspur...) e se la tua università è convenzionata, potrai accedervi anche da casa....prova a digitare bixy su google e vedi un po'....altrimenti prova dai pc della tua facoltà qui http://periodici.caspur.it/

    fammi sapere...

  14. #14
    lulitta24
    Ospite non registrato

    Riferimento: Psicologia della sicurezza

    Ciao, giusto questa mattina ho chiesto la tesi sulla psicologia della sicurezza......sarà dura....comunque lui mi consigliava i testi di Avallone, Quaglino, Schein....per avere intanto un'idea generale....io ho preso gli articoli che ti hanno inviato con la speranza di trovarli....se trovassi altro materiale te lo invio. Buona ricerca.

  15. #15
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di jamostex
    Data registrazione
    12-09-2005
    Residenza
    roma
    Messaggi
    163

    Riferimento: Psicologia della sicurezza

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da lulitta24 Visualizza messaggio
    Ciao, giusto questa mattina ho chiesto la tesi sulla psicologia della sicurezza......sarà dura....comunque lui mi consigliava i testi di Avallone, Quaglino, Schein....per avere intanto un'idea generale....
    lui? l'altissimo?

    Schein non mi pare abbia scritto di sicurezza....ma se hai trovato qualcosa fammi sapere che sono curioso, di Avallone avevo letto qualcosa di davvero molto molto generale nella parte introduttiva dei suoi libri sulla salute e sul benessere organizzativo...

    ciao!

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