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Discussione: tesi gruppi auto aiuto

  1. #1
    Partecipante
    Data registrazione
    28-07-2006
    Messaggi
    43

    tesi gruppi auto aiuto

    Ciao devo fare una tesi della triennali sui gruppi di auto-aiuto. Qualcuno sa darmi qualche dritta su bibliografia, su un argomento sul quale focalizzarmi. Grazie mille

  2. #2
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: tesi gruppi auto aiuto

    "viaggio Nei Gruppi Di Auto Mutuo Aiuto" - Tesi di Metoddologia Del Servizio Sociale 1 gratis Studenti.it

    Bibliografia

    Aiutami a dire addio. Il mutuo aiuto nel lutto e nelle altre perdite - Arnaldo Pangrazzi - Psychostore - Libri di psicologia, test psicologici, software professionale per psicologi

    Tesi di Laurea - Comunicazione e Collaborazione in Rete: gruppi di supporto e forum di auto aiuto

    tecnoteca.it - Apprendimento e pratiche in una comunitā virtuale di auto-mutuo aiuto

    Applying a Stress and Coping Framework to Research on Mutual Help Organizations. By: Humphreys, Keith; Finney, John W.; Moos, Rudolf H.. Journal of Community Psychology, Oct94, Vol. 22 Issue 4, p312-327, 16p Abstract: Few studies of mutual help have been guided by coherent conceptual frameworks. We introduce a stress and coping model that can guide research on self-help groups and contribute to conceptualizing them as normative social groupings. Our model suggests that coping responses, life stressors, and social resources influence the processes by which persons become involved in mutual help organizations and, in turn, are influenced by involvement in mutual help. To provide initial empirical support for the model. We present a longitudinal study of stress and coping and Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) affiliation among 439 problem drinkers. Problem thinkers who relied more on avoidant coping responses, had Fewer work and partner resources, and had more partner stressors became more intensely involved in AA. The results also suggest that AA involvement affects members' coping responses and increases their friendship resources. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 11985684)

    Applying a Stress and Coping Framework to Research on Mutual Help Organizations. By: Humphreys, Keith; Finney, John W.; Moos, Rudolf H.. Journal of Community Psychology, Oct94, Vol. 22 Issue 4, p312-327, 16p Abstract: Few studies of mutual help have been guided by coherent conceptual frameworks. We introduce a stress and coping model that can guide research on self-help groups and contribute to conceptualizing them as normative social groupings. Our model suggests that coping responses, life stressors, and social resources influence the processes by which persons become involved in mutual help organizations and, in turn, are influenced by involvement in mutual help. To provide initial empirical support for the model. we present a longitudinal study of stress and coping and Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) affiliation among 439 problem drinkers. Problem thinkers who relied more on avoidant coping responses, had Fewer work and partner resources, and had more partner stressors became more intensely involved in AA. The results also suggest that AA involvement affects members' coping responses and increases their friendship resources. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 11985689)

    Communal Housing Settings Enhance Substance Abuse Recovery. By: Jason, Leonard A.; Olson, Bradley D.; Ferrari, Joseph R.; Lo Sasso, Anthony T.. American Journal of Public Health, Oct2006, Vol. 96 Issue 10, p1727-1729, 3p Abstract: Oxford Houses are democratic, mutual help-oriented recovery homes for individuals with substance abuse histories. There are more than 1200 of these houses in the United States, and each home is operated independently by its residents, without help from professional staff. In a recent experiment, 150 individuals in Illinois were randomly assigned to either an Oxford House or usual-care condition (i.e., outpatient treatment or self-help groups) after substance abuse treatment discharge. At the 24-month follow-up, those in the Oxford House condition compared with the usual-care condition had significantly lower substance use, significantly higher monthly income, and significantly lower incarceration rates. (Am J Public Health. 2006;96:1727-1729. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2005.070839) [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 22585664)

    In 12-step groups, helping helps the helper. By: Zemore, Sarah E.; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Ammon, Lyndsay N.. Addiction, Aug2004, Vol. 99 Issue 8, p1015-1023, 9p, 2 charts, 3 diagrams Abstract: The helper therapy principle suggests that, within mutual-help groups, those who help others help themselves. The current study examines whether clients in treatment for alcohol and drug problems benefit from helping others, and how helping relates to 12-step involvement. Longitudinal treatment outcome. An ethnically diverse community sample of 279 alcohol- and/or drug-dependent individuals (162 males, 117 females) was recruited through advertisement and treatment referral from Northern California Bay Area communities. Participants were treated at one of four day-treatment programs. A helping checklist measured the amount of time participants spent, during treatment, helping others by sharing experiences, explaining how to get help and giving advice on housing and employment. Measures of 12-step involvement and substance use outcomes were administered at baseline and a 6 month follow-up. Helping and 12-step involvement emerged as important and related predictors of treatment outcomes. In the general sample, total abstinence at follow-up was strongly and positively predicted by 12-step involvement at follow-up, but not by helping during treatment; still, helping positively predicted subsequent 12-step involvement. Among individuals still drinking at follow-up, helping during treatment predicted a lower probability of binge drinking, whereas effects for 12-step involvement proved inconsistent. Findings support the helper therapy principle and clarify the process of 12-step affiliation. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2004.00782.x (AN 13834334)

    Positive risk taking within partnerships: Key factors promoting mental health and wellbeing in GROW mutual help groups. By: Finn, L.. Australian Journal of Psychology, Aug2003 Supplement, Vol. 55, p179-179, 0p Abstract: Taking positive risks, which entails stepping beyond one's comfort zone to develop skills as a group leader, is a key mechanism promoting wellbeing and mental health in the mutual help groups organised by GROW, the Australia-wide community mental health organisation. GROW's leadership structure offers avenues for graded development of life management/social skills requiting ever greater risk-taking by a GROW member. These risks are taken in the supportive context of partnerships where GROW group leaders help to run/facilitate groups operating within the GROW organisation. Skills development takes place alongside a sense of identity transformation, where a GROW member comes to feel useful, valuable and a sense of belonging as a group facilitator and 'stakeholder' in GROW. These findings are among outcomes of research employing qualitative and quantitative methodology which investigated the impact of GROW on psychological wellbeing. The quantitative study surveying 900 GROW members employed a six-factor scale of psychological wellbeing. The results pointed to extent of involvement in GROW activities as being related to improvement in coping skills and reductions in the use of medication/hospitalisation. Significant differences on wellbeing factors were found according to level of responsibility/skill involved in the different GROW leadership roles. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 11893463)

    Italian psychiatric reform 20 plus years after. By: Burti, L.. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, Dec2001 Supplement 410, Vol. 104, p41-46, 6p Abstract: Objective: To describe the current situation of mental health care in Italy and implementation of mental health reform legislation. Method: The current mental health care system and studies of the implementation of psychiatric reform are described. Results: The 1978 reform law inaugurated fundamental changes in the care system (prohibiting admissions to state mental hospitals, stipulating community-based services, allowing hospitalization only in small general-hospital units). Uneven reform implementation was reported initially. However, in 1984 in- and out-patient services in the community were available to >80% of the population. There is a comprehensive network of in- and out-patient, residential and semi-residential facilities. Recently, services have been jeopardized by the managed-care revolution, and non-profit organizations supplement the public system (especially residential care, employment and self/mutual help). Conclusion: Implementation of the psychiatric reform law has been accomplished, and the year 1998 marked the very end of the state mental hospital system in Italy. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1034/j.1600-0447.2001.1040s2041.x (AN 6032250)

    A comparison of espoused theories of self- and mutual help: Implications for mental health professionals. McFadden, Lisa; Seidman, Edward; Rappaport, Julian; Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, Vol 23(6), Dec 1992. pp. 515-520. [Journal Article] Abstract: Nonprofessional helping organizations, known as self- or mutual-help groups, are viewed as homogeneous, varying primarily in the problem addressed. However, there is great diversity in their methods, even among groups addressing similar problems, which has important implications for referring clinicians. Results of this study, which is a content analysis of the literature of 2 internationally known organizations for the mentally ill, suggest nonprofessional helping organizations are not homogeneous. Techniques of self-help based on authority, as opposed to mutual-help based on interpersonal and spiritual growth, characterize some of the differences. Groups also differ in problems addressed and help strategies offered. Implications of these differences for mental health professionals are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

    Evaluation of a mutual help network for the elderly residents of planned housing. Baumgarten, Mona; Thomas, Daniel; de Courval, Louise P.; Psychology and Aging, Vol 3(4), Dec 1988. pp. 393-398. [Journal Article] Abstract: We set up a mutual help network among the elderly residents of a government-subsidized apartment building and evaluated its impact on their social ties, social support satisfaction, and depression. A quasi-experimental design was used, with the residents of a similar building located in the same neighborhood serving as the control group. A total of 230 individual services were exchanged, and 28 group activities were organized during the study period. There was almost no difference between experimental and control groups with respect to the change over the study period in the number of social ties with other residents of the building. Support satisfaction decreased in both groups, but the decrease was larger in the experimental group. The control group had a slight decrease in the frequency of their depressive symptoms, whereas the experimental group had a moderate increase. More research is needed on the ability of social support interventions to produce beneficial effects on mental health among individuals who are not experiencing a particular life stress. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Community Treatment of the Mentally Ill: The Promise of Mutual-Help Organizations. By: Salem, Deborah A.; Seidman, Edward; Rappaport, Julian. Social Work, Sep/Oct88, Vol. 33 Issue 5, p403-408, 6p; Abstract: The article focuses on deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill in the U.S. The failure of deinstitutionalization is less a problem of what is known and more a problem of what is done. The literature on alternatives to hospitalization suggests that successful programs involve individually tailored, assertive, long-term support. Mutual-help organizations, which have the above-mentioned characteristics, are promising community treatment alternatives consistent with the original goals of deinstitutionalization. Deinstitutionalization was intended to decrease use of traditional institutional settings and expand so-called community-based alternatives, and supporters anticipated an improvement in quality of life and an increase in effectiveness of care. The research literature on alternatives to hospitalization indicates that the necessary ingredients of community care can be reliably identified. Research is consistent enough across studies to conclude that successful programs must, above all, provide ongoing, long-term support. Although deinstitutionalization has failed as a national policy, the research literature demonstrates that the problem is one of implementation rather than "treatment" effects. (AN 5267832)

    Professionals in mutual help groups: Impact on social climate and members' behavior. Toro, Paul A.; Reischl, Thomas M.; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol 56(4), Aug 1988. pp. 631-632. [Journal Article] Abstract: This study assessed the impact of professional involvement in mutual help groups for the mentally ill. Social climate data and behavioral data on members in groups led either by a mental health professional (n = 36) or an indigenous group member (n = 70) were compared. The results of the study indicated a more formal, psychologically directed approach in the professionally led groups. Although professional involvement in mutual help groups does not necessarily produce different member outcomes, it does seem to affect both the perceptions and the behavior of members. Professionals should be cautious when they get involved in mutual help groups to avoid professionalizing them. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    A Mutual-Help Project for Families of Handicapped Children. By: Pearson, Judith E.; Sternberg, Abby. Journal of Counseling & Development, Dec86, Vol. 65 Issue 4, p213, 3p Abstract: The authors describe a program for families of handicapped children that features educational programs and parent and sibling support groups. Parenting a disabled child often is emotionally overwhelming (Barsch, 1968; Buscaglia, 1983; Featherstone, 1980; Heisler, 1972; Hewett, 1970; Olshansky 1962). A child's disability threatens family goals and security and shatters parental hopes and expectations. Parents often are exhausted, marriages are strained, and families feel isolated from the mainstream of community life. Positive parental adjustment requires obtaining a proper diagnosis, securing medical care, ensuring an appropriate education, using community resources, and planning for the child's future. Parents need information about child care community agencies, and disabilities. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 4980388)

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  3. #3
    Eleonora_87
    Ospite non registrato

    Riferimento: tesi gruppi auto aiuto

    ciao...
    sono una studentessa di Tecnica della Riabilitazione Psichiatrica e ho iniziato a seguire dei gruppi di auto mutuo aiuto con famiglie di pazienti psichiatrici con l'intento di farci una tesi di laurea. qualcuno potrebbe darmi dei riferimenti o del materiale relativi a metodi di valutazione sull'emotivitā espressa o sulla qualitā di vita di tali famiglie all'interno del gruppo?...

  4. #4

    Riferimento: tesi gruppi auto aiuto

    ciao, alcuni riferimenti utili sono:
    Cinzia Albanesi
    2006 I gruppi di auto-aiuto, Roma, Carocci , le bussole

    Bruna Zani, Elvira Cicognani
    2000 Psicologia della salute, Bologna, Il Mulino

    Piero Amerio
    2000 Psicologia di comunitā, Bologna, Il Mulino

    Bruna Zani, Augusto Palmonari
    1995 Manuale di psicologia di comunitā, Bologna, Il Mulino

    Jim Orford
    1992 Psicologia di comunitā - Aspetti teorici e professionali, Presentazione di Massimo Santinello, Bologna, Il Mulino

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