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Visualizzazione risultati 1 fino 6 di 6

Discussione: Sorriso

  1. #1
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di Democrito
    Data registrazione
    02-05-2008
    Residenza
    Roma
    Messaggi
    123

    Sorriso

    Al solito le mie domande tecniche sono difficilmente riconducibili ad una delle sezioni...
    Sto cercando dei testi sul sorriso, non però nel senso psicologico ma meccanico. Intendo dire testi che spiegano quali sono le parti coinvolte del volto, cosa a livello neuronale lo fa scattare, questioni fisiologiche, insomma. Quindi non una spiegazione di cosa il sorriso serva, ma come venga prodotto e quali siano le sue dinamiche.

    Spero di aver reso l'idea e grazie per l'aiuto. Buon lavoro e buon tutto,

    Enrico.
    "La felicità è un dovere" (Alain)

  2. #2
    Partecipante Super Esperto L'avatar di Brisa
    Data registrazione
    23-03-2004
    Messaggi
    528

    Riferimento: Sorriso

    Ciao, purtroppo non so rispondere alla tua domanda, ma suppongo che avrai più fortuna nella sezione di neuropsicologia, quindi magari sposta lì la tua richiesta.

    PS: hai provato nelle biblioteche di medicina?

  3. #3
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: Sorriso

    A Smile Begins in Your Brain. By: Estorino, Diana. American Journal of Electroneurodiagnostic Technology, Dec2007, Vol. 47 Issue 4, p287-288, 2p Abstract: The facial nerve is one of twelve pairs of cranial nerves. It is a mixed, motor and sensory nerve that supplies motor innervation to the facial muscles, as well as the sensation of taste and parasympathetic fibers to the lacrimal and salivary glands. Also known as CN-VII, the facial nerve is comprised of lour primary components: the brachial motor, special sensory, general sensory, and visceral motor. The muscles of facial expression are innervated by the brachial motor segment. This segment divides to form five distal branches that innervate the facial muscles: temporal, zygomatic, buccal, mandibular, and cervical branches. The muscles of facial expression can be identified by asking the patient to voluntarily move those muscles. For example, frontalis ("Raise your eyebrows and wrinkle your forehead"); orbicularis oculi ("Squint or shut your eyes tight"); nasalis ("Flare your nostrils"); risorius ("Grin without separating your lips"); zygomaticus major ("Give me a big smile"): orbicularis oris ("Pucker your lips"); mentalis ("Raise your chin"): etc. This video presentation has the following objectives: 1. Review the basic anatomy and physiology of the facial nerve. 2. Identify some common muscles of facial expression in normal volunteers. 3. Demonstrate facial muscle contractions in patients with facial deficits. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 28835886)

    Differences between children and adults in the recognition of enjoyment smiles. Del Giudice, Marco; Colle, Livia; Developmental Psychology, Vol 43(3), May 2007. pp. 796-803. [Journal Article] Abstract: The authors investigated the differences between 8-year-olds (n = 80) and adults (n = 80) in recognition of felt versus faked enjoyment smiles by using a newly developed picture set that is based on the Facial Action Coding System. The authors tested the effect of different facial action units (AUs) on judgments of smile authenticity. Multiple regression showed that children base their judgment on AU intensity of both mouth and eyes, with relatively little distinction between the Duchenne marker (AU6 or "cheek raiser") and a different voluntary muscle that has a similar effect on eye aperture (AU7 or "lid tightener"). Adults discriminate well between AU6 and AU7 and seem to use eye-mouth discrepancy as a major cue of authenticity. Bared-teeth smiles (involving AU25) are particularly salient to both groups. The authors propose and discuss an initial developmental model of the smile recognition process. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Is there more in a happy face than just a big smile? By: Leppänen, Jukka M.; Hietanen, Jari K.. Visual Cognition, May2007, Vol. 15 Issue 4, p468-490, 23p, 1 diagram, 2 graphs, 2 bw Abstract: Happy faces involve appearance changes in the mouth (the smile) and eye region (e.g., narrowing of the eye opening). The present experiments investigated whether the recognition of happy faces is achieved on the basis of the smile alone or whether information in the eye region is also used. A go/no-go task was used in which participants responded to happy faces and withhold a response to nonhappy distractors. The presence/absence of the expressive cues in the eyes did not affect recognition accuracy but reaction times were slightly longer for smiles without expressive cues in the eyes. This delay was not obtained when the top and the bottom halves of the faces were misaligned, or when the distractor was changed from a top-dominant to a bottom-dominant facial expression (i.e., from anger to disgust). Together, these results suggest that the eyes may have a modest effect on speeded recognition of happy faces although the presence of this effect may depend on task context. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/13506280600765333 (AN 24325308)

    Contralateral Smile and Laughter, but No Mirth, Induced by Electrical Stimulation of the Cingulate Cortex. By: Sperli, Francesca; Spinelli, Laurent; Pollo, Claudio; Seeck, Margitta. Epilepsia (Series 4), Feb2006, Vol. 47 Issue 2, p440-443, 4p, 1 chart, 1 bw Abstract: The cerebral representation of laughter is dissociated. The emotional aspects seem to be processed in the temporal lobe; whereas the motor features apparently rely on the frontal cortex. In a few prior studies of patients in whom laughter was elicited by electrical stimulation (ES), it always was associated with mirth. We report a patient in whom ES in the right cingulate gyrus elicited smile and laughter, but no mirth. At low voltages, smiling was seen first contralaterally and became bilateral with increasing currents. Our observation supports the concept of the motor representation of laughter in the mesial frontal cortex. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1528-1167.2006.00442.x (AN 19792338)

    VOLUNTARY SMILING CHANGES REGIONAL BRAIN ACTIVITY. By: Ekman, Paul; Davidson, Richard J.. Psychological Science, Sep93, Vol. 4 Issue 5, p342-345, 4p, 1 graph; Abstract: Studies the significance of regional brain activity in different smiles. Form of smiling producing the physiological pattern associated with enjoyment; Investigation whether smiles occur with negative and positive emotions; Examination of regional brain activity with more traditional tasks used to arouse emotion. (AN 8561006)

    The Duchenne smile: Emotional expression and brain physiology: II. Ekman, Paul; Davidson, Richard J.; Friesen, Wallace V.; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol 58(2), Feb 1990. pp. 342-353. [Journal Article] Abstract: Facial expression, EEG, and self-report of subjective emotional experience were recorded while subjects individually watched both pleasant and unpleasant films. Smiling in which the muscle that orbits the eye is active in addition to the muscle that pulls the lip corners up (the Duchenne smile) was compared with other smiling in which the muscle orbiting the eye was not active. As predicted, the Duchenne smile was related to enjoyment in terms of occurring more often during the pleasant than the unpleasant films, in measures of cerebral asymmetry, and in relation to subjective reports of positive emotions, and other smiling was not. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Patterns of brain electrical activity during facial signs of emotion in 10-month-old infants. Fox, Nathan A.; Davidson, Richard J.; Developmental Psychology, Vol 24(2), Mar 1988. pp. 230-236. [Journal Article] Abstract: This study examined electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetries during the presence of discrete facial signs of emotion. Thirty-five 10-month-old infants were tested in a standard stranger- and mother-approach paradigm that included a brief separation from their mother. Infant facial expression was videotaped, and brain electrical activity from left and right frontal and parietal regions was recorded. The videotapes were coded with two different discrete facial coding systems. Artifact-free periods of EEG were extracted that were coincident with the expression of the emotions of joy, anger, and sadness. The data revealed different patterns of EEG asymmetry depending on the type of facial expression and vocal expression of affect that was observed. Expressions of joy that involved facial actions of both zygomatic and orbicularis oculi were seen more often in response to mother approach, whereas smiles that did not involve the action of orbicularis oculi were seen more often in response to approach of the stranger. The former type of smile was associated with relative left frontal activation, whereas the latter type was associated with right frontal activation. Facial expressions of anger and sadness exhibited in the absence of crying were associated with left frontal activation, whereas these same facial expressions during crying were associated with right frontal activation. These data underscore the usefulness of EEG measures of hemispheric activation in differentiating among emotional states associated with differences in facial and vocalic expressivity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Per ora, solo questi

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  4. #4
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di Democrito
    Data registrazione
    02-05-2008
    Residenza
    Roma
    Messaggi
    123

    Riferimento: Sorriso

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da Brisa Visualizza messaggio
    Ciao, purtroppo non so rispondere alla tua domanda, ma suppongo che avrai più fortuna nella sezione di neuropsicologia, quindi magari sposta lì la tua richiesta.

    PS: hai provato nelle biblioteche di medicina?
    Hai ragione, provo a spostarlo. All'inizio pensavo che sarebbe stato più utile inserirlo nella sezione "Psicologia dello sviluppo" perché l'argomento è spesso affrontato da questo orientamento di studi (soprattutto per via dei bambini e l'imprinting). Però effettivamente è un tema di stampo neuropsicologico.
    Non ho controllato nelle biblioteche di medicina. Ma il problema non è tanto trovare testi od articoli, perché ve ne sono veramente tanti, quanto trovare una bibliografia specifica a quello che cerco. E lì invece ci sono pochi testi. A dire il vero una monografia approfondita c'è, ed è Le sourire di Dumas, ma sfortunatamente non so leggere il francese.

    Willy, non quoto il tuo messaggio perché se no il post raggiungerebbe dimensioni eccessive, ma sappi che mi sei stato veramente d'aiuto! Appena posso mi leggo gli articoli e ti faccio sapere se hanno risposto alla mia domanda. Ovviamente qualsiasi altro suggerimento è ben accetto nel mentre

    Grazie ad entrambi. Buon lavoro e buon tutto,

    Enrico.
    "La felicità è un dovere" (Alain)

  5. #5
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di Democrito
    Data registrazione
    02-05-2008
    Residenza
    Roma
    Messaggi
    123

    Riferimento: Sorriso

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da willy61 Visualizza messaggio
    Is there more in a happy face than just a big smile? By: Leppänen, Jukka M.; Hietanen, Jari K.. Visual Cognition, May2007, Vol. 15 Issue 4, p468-490, 23p, 1 diagram, 2 graphs, 2 bw Abstract: Happy faces involve appearance changes in the mouth (the smile) and eye region (e.g., narrowing of the eye opening). The present experiments investigated whether the recognition of happy faces is achieved on the basis of the smile alone or whether information in the eye region is also used. A go/no-go task was used in which participants responded to happy faces and withhold a response to nonhappy distractors. The presence/absence of the expressive cues in the eyes did not affect recognition accuracy but reaction times were slightly longer for smiles without expressive cues in the eyes. This delay was not obtained when the top and the bottom halves of the faces were misaligned, or when the distractor was changed from a top-dominant to a bottom-dominant facial expression (i.e., from anger to disgust). Together, these results suggest that the eyes may have a modest effect on speeded recognition of happy faces although the presence of this effect may depend on task context. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/13506280600765333 (AN 24325308)
    Questo è proprio quello che stavo cercando. Da dove hai estratto questo articolo? Ho cercato nell'ICCU (il servizio bibliotecario nazionale) la monografia "Visual cognition" ma non ha portato alcun risultato.

    Fammi sapere qualcosa appena puoi. E' la seconda volta che mi aiuti e ti ringrazio veramente tanto, non esitare a chiedere il mio appoggio qualora tu ne avessi bisogno. Buon lavoro e buon tutto,

    Enrico.
    Ultima modifica di Democrito : 20-06-2008 alle ore 17.44.43
    "La felicità è un dovere" (Alain)

  6. #6

    Riferimento: Sorriso

    Non so dirti titoli di libri che parlano del sorriso ma posso dirti di provare a guardare un po' questo blog!Qualche notizia e informazione carina sul sorriso c'è!

    LA PSICOLOGIA DEL SORRISO

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