• Opsonline.it
  • Facebook
  • twitter
  • youtube
  • linkedin
Visualizzazione risultati 1 fino 9 di 9

Discussione: x la mia tesi...

  1. #1
    cettinin82
    Ospite non registrato

    x la mia tesi...

    ciao a tutti..sn nuova di qst sito..ci sn arrivata cercando materiale x la mia tesi..davvero molto interessante..
    il titolo ke mi è stato assegnato dal mio prof è "disturbi del comportamento nell'infanzia: il temperamento della madre e quello del bambino"..mi piace davvero moltoooo...
    ho trovato qlcs sul temperamento e le diverse teorie dell'attaccamento..ed ora mi sto indirizzando sui vari test e scale che possono essere utili nella misurazione di qst tipo di legame..c'è davvero tanto..
    se qlcn più esperto sicuramente di me ha dei consigli su cosa, dove e cm cercare è ben accetto!!!

    grazie a tutti!!!

  2. #2
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: x la mia tesi...

    Articoli sul temperamento:

    Trajectories of externalizing behavior from age 2 to age 9: Relations with gender, temperament, ethnicity, parenting, and rater. Miner, Jennifer L.; Clarke-Stewart, K. Alison; Developmental Psychology, Vol 44(3), May 2008. pp. 771-786. [Journal Article] Abstract: Trajectories of children's externalizing behavior were examined using multilevel growth curve modeling of data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. According to ratings by both mothers and caregivers/teachers when children were 2, 3, 4, 7, and 9 years old, externalizing behavior declined with age. However, mothers rated children as higher in externalizing behavior than did caregivers and teachers. Higher levels of age 9 externalizing behavior were predicted by the following factors: child male gender (for caregiver/teacher reports only), infant difficult temperament (for children with harsh mothers only), harsher maternal attitude toward discipline, higher level of maternal depression (for maternal reports only), and lower level of maternal sensitivity (especially for boys). Caregivers and teachers reported higher levels of externalizing behavior in African American children than in European American children, increasingly so over time; mothers' ratings revealed the reverse. The declining slope of externalizing behavior was predicted by infant difficult temperament for mother reports only. Additional analyses suggested that the association between parenting and externalizing behavior was bidirectional. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)
    Cited References (73)

    Temperament, Executive Functions, and the Allocation of Attention to Punishment Feedback in Passive Avoidance Learning. By: Farmer, Richard F.; Whitehead, Kathryn A.; Woolcock, Colette Mary. Journal of Personality, Jun2007, Vol. 75 Issue 3, p569-594, 26p, 3 charts Abstract: Several theories have been proposed to account for the apparent non-responsiveness to punishment cues or aversive events demonstrated by members of some disinhibited groups. Included among these theories are those that emphasize individual differences in temperament, temperament-related biases associated with the allocation of attentional resources, and impairments in executive functions. This study examined the relative contribution of each of these variables to the prediction of passive avoidance errors (PAEs, or failures to inhibit responding to punishment cues) during a computerized go/no-go task. Variations in temperament, attentional allocation to punishment feedback, and executive functions were found to independently and additively contribute to the prediction of PAEs in a mixed sample of men and women recruited at a university campus ( n=145). Results from this study, therefore, support multiple theoretical perspectives on PAEs as assessed by the go/no-go experimental paradigm. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-6494.2007.00449.x (AN 24962788)

    Mother-Child Conflict Interaction in the Toddler Years: Behavior Patterns and Correlates. By: Huang, Keng-Yen; Teti, Douglas; Caughy, Margaret; Feldstein, Stanley; Genevro, Janice. Journal of Child & Family Studies, Apr2007, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p219-241, 23p, 4 charts Abstract: We examined mother-child (M-C) conflict behavior during the toddler years. The nature of M-C conflict behaviors, whether conflict behavior differed by context, and factors that were associated with conflict interactions were examined. We used data collected as part of the National Evaluation of the Healthy Steps for Young Children Program. 378 M-C dyads participated in this study. Videotaped observational data at 16–18 months were used to code conflict behaviors using an event recording method. Results showed that M-C conflict were more likely to be initiated by the mothers and that conflict interactions were influenced by context of interaction, family, maternal, and child temperamental factors. In this study, we provide a foundation for understanding parent-child conflict interaction prior to age two. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1007/s10826-006-9081-6 (AN 24940837)

    Infant Joint Attention, Temperament, and Social Competence in Preschool Children. By: Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Mundy, Peter C.; Acra, C. Françoise; Block, Jessica J.; Delgado, Christine E. F.; Parlade, Meaghan V.; Neal, A. Rebecca; Meyer, Jessica A.; Pomares, Yuly B.. Child Development, Jan2007, Vol. 78 Issue 1, p53-69, 17p, 5 charts, 4 bw Abstract: Infant joint attention has been observed to be related to social-emotional outcomes in at-risk children. To address whether this relation is also evident in typically developing children, 52 children were tested at 12, 15, 24, and 30 months to examine associations between infant joint attention and social outcomes. Twelve-month initiating and responding to joint attention were related to 30-month social competence and externalizing behavior, even when accounting for 15-month temperament ratings, 24-month cognition and language, and demographic variables. These results suggest that, in addition to associations with language and cognition, infant joint attention reflects robust aspects of development that are related to individual differences in the emergence of social and behavioral competence in childhood. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2007.00985.x (AN 24165059)

    Studying Cross-cultural Differences in the Development of Infant Temperament: People’s Republic of China, the United States of America, and Spain. By: Gartstein, Maria A.; Gonzalez, Carmen; Carranza, Jose A.; Ahadi, Stephan A.; Ye, Renmin; Rothbart, Mary K.; Suh Wen Yang. Child Psychiatry & Human Development, Dec2006, Vol. 37 Issue 2, p145-161, 17p, 5 charts Abstract: Investigated early development of temperament across three cultures: People’s Republic of China (PRC), United States of America (US), and Spain, utilizing a longitudinal design (assessments at 3, 6, and 9 months of age). Selection of these countries presented an opportunity to conduct Eastern–Western/Individualistic–Collectivistic comparisons. The greatest number of significant differences (i.e., involving more temperament dimensions) was anticipated for the US (Western/Individualistic) and PRC (Eastern/Collectivistic) comparisons. The US sample included 66, the PRC group 69, and the Spanish sample, 60 mothers, all of whom completed the Infant Behavior Questionnaire (IBQ) 3 times, when their infants were 3, 6, and 9 months of age. Results related to mean group differences were generally consistent with our hypotheses, demonstrating a greater number of significant differences for US versus PRC, with fewer differences observed for US and Spain. Analyses addressing developmental changes in temperament indicated patterns consistent with a priori expectations and cross-cultural differences. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1007/s10578-006-0025-6 (AN 22657583)

    The Development of Children's Ideal and Ought Self-Guides: Parenting, Temperament, and Individual Differences in Guide Strength. By: Manian, Nanmathi; Papadakis, Alison A.; Strauman, Timothy J.; Essex, Marilyn J.. Journal of Personality, Dec2006, Vol. 74 Issue 6, p1619-1646, 28p, 2 diagrams Abstract: Regulatory focus theory (RFT; Higgins, 1997 ) predicts that individual differences in the strength of promotion (ideal) and prevention (ought) orientations emerge from patterns of parent/child interactions that emphasize making good things happen versus keeping bad things from happening. This article examines the development of individual differences in the strength of children's promotion and prevention goals and presents selected findings from three studies exploring the origins of regulatory focus. We found a three-factor structure for parenting behaviors that differentiated between the presence/absence of positive outcomes versus the presence/absence of negative outcomes in two different data sets and validated that factor structure by examining its associations with maternal temperament. In turn, the parenting factors predicted individual differences in children's orientations to ideal and ought guides, and those associations were moderated by individual differences in child temperament. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-6494.2006.00422.x (AN 22952761)

    Brain glucose metabolism and temperament in relation to severe somatization. By: HAKALA, MIKA; VAHLBERG, TERO; NIEMI, PÄIVI M.; KARLSSON, HASSE. Psychiatry & Clinical Neurosciences, Dec2006, Vol. 60 Issue 6, p669-675, 7p, 4 charts Abstract: Little is known about the pathophysiology of somatization. The authors’ aim was to explore associated factors with somatoform disorders. The authors studied 10 female patients with a diagnosis of somatization disorder or undifferentiated somatoform disorder with no comorbid current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edn) Axis I disorder and 12 healthy female volunteers. The predicting variables were temperament factors of the 240-item Temperament and Character Inventory instrument and regional brain glucose metabolism. Low novelty-seeking and high harm avoidance temperament traits and low caudate and low putamen glucose metabolism were statistically significantly associated with severe somatization ( P < 0.05). In the present study, severe somatization associates with both altered brain glucose metabolism and temperament factors. No other studies on association of somatization with brain glucose metabolism and temperament have been published. The results are still considered exploratory due to the small number of subjects. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1819.2006.01581.x (AN 23064873)

    Peer Contacts of 15-Month-olds in Childcare: Links With Child Temperament, Parent–Child Interaction and Quality of Childcare. By: Deynoot-Schaub, Mirjam J. Gevers; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne. Social Development, Nov2006, Vol. 15 Issue 4, p709-729, 21p, 4 charts Abstract: Seventy 15-month-old children were observed during 90 minutes of free play with their peers in childcare centers. The study aimed to describe individual differences in the children's contacts with peers and to explain the individual differences in relation to: (1) child temperament, (2) the quality of parental behavior toward the child and (3) the quality of the professional childcare environment. Three distinct peer contact factors emerged from our analyses; one reflects children's involvement in peer contacts initiated by peers and two reflect the positive and negative contacts initiated by the target children themselves. Children in groups with more children per caregiver were found to be involved in more contacts initiated by peers. Children with a relatively difficult temperament were less involved in contacts initiated by peers although only in cases of lower quality childcare, as assessed using the infant/toddler environment rating scale. Boys initiated significantly more negative contacts with peers than girls. In addition, more peer-directed negative initiatives were observed in lower quality childcare. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9507.2006.00366.x (AN 22908392)

    Mother's early perception of her infant's difficult temperament, parenting stress and early mother–infant interaction By: Mäntymaa, Mirjami; Puura, Kaija; Luoma, Ilona; Salmelin, Raili K.; Tamminen, Tuula. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, Oct2006, Vol. 60 Issue 5, p379-386, 7p Abstract: The current study investigated factors contributing to mother's early perception of her infant's difficult temperament. One hundred and twenty-four mother–infant dyads participated in the study. Mother's perception of the infant's temperament was assessed with the Infant Characteristics Questionnaire (ICQ). The influence of mother–infant interaction, mother's mental health and parenting stress were investigated. Mother–infant interaction was videotaped during a face-to-face interaction and analysed using the Global Rating Scale. Mother's mental health was assessed through a structured interview (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, SCID) and parenting stress was examined by a questionnaire (Parenting Stress Index). First, the difficultness scale of the ICQ was used as a continuous variable and factors contributing to mother's perception of her infant's temperament as more or less difficult were examined. Secondly, infants were categorized into difficult and non-difficult, and factors increasing the infant's risk of being perceived as difficult were examined. The model including mother's mental health and parental distress accounted for 24% of the variance in perceived infant difficultness, with parental distress in particular being an influential contributor. When infants categorized as difficult were examined, mother's intrusiveness and infant's poor interactive behaviour in early mother–infant interaction as well as parental distress significantly increased the infant's risk of being perceived as difficult. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/08039480600937280 (AN 22692724)

    Temperament, parenting, and depressive symptoms in a population sample of preadolescents. By: Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Veenstra, René; Ormel, Johan; De Winter, Andrea F.; Verhulst, Frank C.. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, Jul2006, Vol. 47 Issue 7, p684-695, 12p, 3 charts, 1 graph Abstract: Background: Depressive symptoms can be triggered by negative social experiences and individuals’ processing of these experiences. This study focuses on the interaction between temperament, perceived parenting, and gender in relation to depressive problems in a Dutch population sample of preadolescents. Methods: The sample consisted of 2230 ten-to-twelve-year-olds from the North of the Netherlands. Perceived parenting (overprotection, rejection, emotional warmth) was assessed by the EMBU (a Swedish acronym for My Memories of Upbringing) for Children, temperament (fearfulness and frustration) by the parent version of the Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire-Revised, and depressive problems by the Child Behavior Checklist (parent report) and the Youth Self-Report (child report). Results: All parenting and temperament factors were significantly associated with depressive problems. Frustration increased the depressogenic effect of parental overprotection and lack of emotional warmth. Fearfulness increased the effect of rejection in girls, but not in boys. Furthermore, the association between frustration and depression was stronger in boys. Conclusions: These findings support the hypothesis that the effect of specific parenting behaviors depends on the temperament and gender of the child. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-7610.2005.01535.x (AN 21123867)

    THE KEIRSEY TEMPERAMENT MODEL: A MODEL FOR HELPING EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATORS FACILITATE ETHICAL DECISION MAKING. By: Mills, Roxanne. Education, Spring2006, Vol. 126 Issue 3, p512-517, 6p; Abstract: The article examines the use of the Keirsey personality type models by educational administrators aimed at helping them develop ethical decision making procedures for their particular school community. Keirsey makes no bones about what he calls temperament being inborn, an important notion for any school leader who must decide to what degree colleagues, teachers, students and parents can change and how one might best facilitate a process of ethical decision making regarding some particular group problem. According to Keirsey there are several types of personality models: the artisans, the guardians, the rationals and the idealists. (AN 20707537)

    Temperament and developmental psychopathology. By: Nigg, Joel T.. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, Mar/Apr2006, Vol. 47 Issue 3/4, p395-422, 28p, 1 chart, 2 diagrams Abstract: This review discusses conceptual issues in relating temperament to psychopathology, including the disputed relation of temperament to personality in children. A potential integrative framework is discussed that links trait and biological markers of temperament (reactive, incentive–response tendencies) with regulatory processes. This framework is utilized to highlight potential temperamental pathways to specific forms of psychopathology, noting that in some instances their relations may reflect a spectrum model (with psychopathology closely related as an extreme of a temperament-based trait), but in many instances it likely reflects a vulnerability-transaction set of processes. Conduct disorder involves at least two temperamental paths, one emanating from low fear response and one from either high incentive approach or high anger reactivity. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder also involves at least two temperament pathways, one involving extremely low effortful control and the other likely involving strong approach. Anxiety disorders appear to result from the confluence of high negative emotionality and low effortful control. Hypotheses for future research are presented and limitations discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-7610.2006.01612.x (AN 19818460)

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  3. #3
    cettinin82
    Ospite non registrato

    Riferimento: x la mia tesi...

    grazie mille x i suggerimenti..ne approfitto ancora una volta..visto ke voi siete esperti ed io nn so cm fare..poichè la mia tesi dovrebbe esser sperimentale..occorrono dei test da somministrare ai genitori e ai bimbi..allara mi servirebbero il QUIT test di giovanna axia..il Q-sort e l'A.A.I:..sapete cm posso intracciarli..se esistono del libri su cui trovare qlcs?!grazieeee mille

  4. #4
    mitica83
    Ospite non registrato

    Riferimento: x la mia tesi...

    CIAO!!
    IO NON SO COME PUOI RECUPERARE I TEST MA POSSO CONSIGLIARTI DUE LIBRI:

    - "STORIE DI VITA" DI FABIO VEGLIA (BOLLATI BORINGHIERI) IN CUI C'E' TUTTO UN CAPITOLO SULL'A.A.I.

    - "PSICOTERAPIA COGNITIVA DELL'ETA' EVOLUTIVA" A CURA DI FURIO LAMBRUSCHI (BOLLATI BORINGHIERI) IN CUI SONO TRATTATI QUASI TUTTI I DISTURBI ED E' FATTO BENE, SICURAMENTE PUO' ESSERCI QUALCOSA CHE TI SERVE...

    UN SALUTO


  5. #5
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: x la mia tesi...

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da cettinin82 Visualizza messaggio
    grazie mille x i suggerimenti..ne approfitto ancora una volta..visto ke voi siete esperti ed io nn so cm fare..poichè la mia tesi dovrebbe esser sperimentale..occorrono dei test da somministrare ai genitori e ai bimbi..allara mi servirebbero il QUIT test di giovanna axia..il Q-sort e l'A.A.I:..sapete cm posso intracciarli..se esistono del libri su cui trovare qlcs?!grazieeee mille
    Dunque, l'A.A.I. non puoi trovarlo da nessuna parte. L'Adult Attachment Interview è una tecnica coperta da copyright e l'elenco completo delle domande, assieme alla griglia di valutazione delle risposte, si può ottenere solamente frequentando i corsi della Ainsworthy, per quel che en so.

    Del Q-sort esistono innumerevoli versioni. Magari, se riesci ad essere più precisa, la versione che ti serve te la trovo pure.

    Per il QUIT della Axia, secondo me, ti conviene chiedere direttamente a lei. Quando l'ho conosciuta era una prof. molto disponibile e "materna" (sarà che pesa come un elefante marino ma l'impressione che mi diede fu quella).

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  6. #6
    Partecipante Affezionato L'avatar di Aleida
    Data registrazione
    09-03-2003
    Residenza
    Padova
    Messaggi
    111

    Riferimento: x la mia tesi...

    magari no... la prof. Axia è mancata l'anno scorso

    del QUIT puoi comprare direttamente il libro, dove c'è tutto... costa sui 20 euro e lo puoi trovare tranquillamente anche in internet.

  7. #7
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: x la mia tesi...

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da Aleida Visualizza messaggio
    magari no... la prof. Axia è mancata l'anno scorso
    Mi dispiace molto. L'avevo trovata molto simpatica e capace. Un peccato. Che le è successo? Mi pareva giovane...

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  8. #8
    Partecipante Affezionato L'avatar di Aleida
    Data registrazione
    09-03-2003
    Residenza
    Padova
    Messaggi
    111

  9. #9
    cettinin82
    Ospite non registrato

    Riferimento: x la mia tesi...

    grazie x i titoli dei libri..sn riuscita a recuperare il libro della Axia..x fortuna lo aveva 1dott di mia conoscenza..

    del Q-sort mi servirebbe qll relativo all'attaccamento ma mi sembra sia valido solo fino ai 5 anni..a me servirebbero dei test x valutare l'attacamento nei bambini fino all'età scolare..quind una fascia d'età ke va dai 6 agli 11 anni max..

    se il q-sort nn esiste..avete idea di altre metodiche?e se nn chiedo troppo..visto ke a qnt pare x l'A.A.I. nn si può recuperare niente..qlc x valutare l'attaccamento anche nelle mamme?!

    grazie mille e scusate lo stress!!!

Privacy Policy