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  1. #1
    Partecipante
    Data registrazione
    21-01-2008
    Messaggi
    53

    tesi sulla socializzazione organizzativa

    ciao a tutti...qualcuno pu˛ consigliarmi libri o articoli dove trovare il pi¨ possibile su questo argomento e soprattutto sullo stress causato da problemi di socializzazione ,inserimento nei gruppi di lavoro....
    grazie in anticipo

  2. #2
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,181
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: tesi sulla socializzazione organizzativa

    Alcuni articoli che potrebbero esserti utili:

    Learning and Strain Among Newcomers: A Three-Wave Study on the Effects of Job Demands and Job Control. By: Taris, Toon W.; Feij, Jan A.. Journal of Psychology, Nov2004, Vol. 138 Issue 6, p543-563, 21p, 2 charts, 3 diagrams Abstract: The present 3-wave longitudinal study was an examination of job-related learning and strain as a function of job demand and job control. The participants were 311 newcomers to their jobs. On the basis of R. A. Karasek and T. Theorell's (1990) demand-control model, the authors predicted that high demand and high job control would lead to high levels of learning; low demand and low job control should lead to low levels of learning; high demand and low job control should lead to high levels of strain; and low demand and high job control should lead to low levels of strain. The relation between strain and learning was also examined. The authors tested the hypotheses using ANCOVA and structural equation modeling. The results revealed that high levels of strain have an adverse effect on learning; the reverse effect was not confirmed. It appears that Karasek and Theorell's model is very relevant when examining work socialization processes. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 15580334)


    Social antecedents of the role stress and career-enhancing strategies of newcomers to organizations: A longitudinal study. By: Jes˙s Bravo, Maria; Peirˇ, JosÚ Maria; Rodriguez, Isabel; Whitely, William T.. Work & Stress, Jul2003, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p195-217, 23p, 1 chart, 2 diagrams Abstract: Newcomers experience uncertainty and stress following entry into an organization. Two features of socialization are important for reducing their stress: socialization tactics and relations with superiors and co-workers. The present study tests a structural equation model, including, first, the effects over time of initial institutional socialization tactics and, second, the association between social relations at the workplace on newcomers' role stress and career-enhancing strategies, two years later, among a large ( N =661) international sample of job and organization stayers. Using LISREL 8.3 the results indicate a good fit between the model and data on several fit indices. Institutional socialization tactics had a significant association with newcomers' relations with both their superiors and co-workers, and a significant negative association with their role conflict. Newcomers' relations with superiors had a negative relationship with their role ambiguity, and a positive relationship with two kinds of career-enhancing strategies that they use to aid in their adaptation to their work situation. The relations of newcomers with co-workers were positively related to role conflict and negatively related to role ambiguity. Co-worker relations were also positively related to immediate career-enhancing strategies. Role conflict was positively related to immediate and negatively related to intermediate career-enhancing strategies, while role ambiguity was negatively related to intermediate career-enhancing strategies. The results are discussed in relation to their theoretical and practical importance. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/02678370310001625658 (AN 11623006)


    The relationship of anticipation to newcomer socialization processes and outcomes: A pilot study. By: Holton III, Elwood F.; Russell, Craig J.. Journal of Occupational & Organizational Psychology, Jun97, Vol. 70 Issue 2, p163-172, 10p, 3 charts, 1 diagram Abstract: The construct of new employee anticipation was explored within a model of newcomer socialization. Measures of anticipation, socialization processes and outcomes obtained from new college graduates one year alter graduation (N = 378) suggested low-anticipation newcomers report lower job satisfaction, commitment, work motivation, job involvement and psychological success. Graduates who anticipated their jobs perceived organizations as being more receptive to them, jobs as more challenging, greater control over their work, more influence on the organization, and understood the culture better. In addition, graduates who had not anticipated their current jobs reported lower levels of satisfaction with the transition, greater stress and more difficulty with the transition. Implications for socialization research and human resource systems are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 9706256280)


    Transitions into newly created jobs. By: West, Michael A.; Nicholson, Nigel; Rees, Anne. Journal of Occupational Psychology, Jun87, Vol. 60 Issue 2, p97-113, 17p, 6 charts, 1 diagram Abstract: The paper reports on a study of adjustment to change, a topic of fundamental importance in the development of individuals and organizations. The study, involving 2304 male and female British managers (extended longitudinally with 1100 of the original sample) reveals that between 34 and 50 per cent of job moves are into jobs for which there was no previous role incumbent. The character and outcomes of these job moves are related to Nicholson's (1984) theory of work role transitions and Van Maanen & Schein's (1979) theory of organizational socialization. The frequency, industrial contexts, main types, and role requirements of these moves are described. Satisfaction and personal change as outcome of moves into newly created jobs are related to role information sources, organizational culture, work characteristics, job characteristics, pre-transition anxiety, self-concept, work motivation and organizational commitment. These findings generally support Nicholson's predictions about how specific role requirements and personal characteristics will influence transition outcomes, but also suggest the need to refine some of the theory's constructs. The results further imply that proactive growth models of adjustment are more generally applicable to radical job change than reactive stress-coping models. The paper concludes by considering the implications of the findings for organizational practice. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 4615878)


    MANAGEMENT TURNOVER: EXPERIENTIAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FORMER AND CURRENT MANAGERS. By: Campion, Michael A.; Mitchell, Michelle M.. Personnel Psychology, Spring86, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p57-69, 13p Abstract: Potential experiential determinants of managerial turnover were investigated based on questionnaire responses from 140 former managers and 143 current managers within the same organization. To assess there experiences, measures were developed from four different areas of literature that consider the turnover phenomenon. Results indicate that, compared to current managers, former managers describe their managerial experiences in terms of (1) less satisfying job characteristics, (2) greater degrees of adjustment and socialization difficulties, (3) more unmet job expectations, and (4) greater degrees of job stress. Furthermore, it was discovered that all four areas of literature actually give very similar advice on reducing turnover, but each area differs in terms of intended applications and time perspective. Recommendations are provided for reducing management turnover. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 6264844)


    Buona vita

    e buona tesi

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n░ 10126

  3. #3
    Partecipante
    Data registrazione
    21-01-2008
    Messaggi
    53

    Riferimento: tesi sulla socializzazione organizzativa

    grazie mille ...sei stato utilissimo ....

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