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Discussione: Mamma cerca aiuto

  1. #1

    Mamma cerca aiuto

    Cerco informazioni sulla sindrome non verbale, soprattutto sulla sua evoluzione e terapia.
    Ho già scritto un post nel forum e ringrazio sin d'ora chi potrù aiutarmi.
    Grazie, Uccia

  2. #2
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di Tottola1
    Data registrazione
    23-06-2007
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    Nord Italia
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    249
    Ciao,benvenuta sul forum! Prova a leggere "Guida alla sindrome di Asperger" di T. Atwood edizioni Erikson,è fatto piuttosto bene.

  3. #3
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
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    Educare.it - La Sindrome Non Verbale (di L. Pasqualotto)
    ValeLogo » La sindrome non verbale
    Disciplina materna e bambini affetti da sindrome di Asperger o sindrome non verbale. | Asperger.it
    http://www.tips4kids.org/documents/r...%202007-08.pdf

    Alcuni articoli (in inglese) che posso mettere a disposizione di chi me li chiede

    The Influence of Instruction Modality on Brain Activation in Teenagers With Nonverbal Learning Disabilities: Two Case Histories. By: Tuller, Betty; Jantzen, Kelly J.; Olvera, Dianne; Steinberg, Fred; Kelso, J. A. Scott. Journal of Learning Disabilities, Jul/Aug2007, Vol. 40 Issue 4, p348-359, 12p Abstract: Teenagers with nonverbal learning disabilities (NLD) have difficulty with fine-motor coordination, which may relate to the novelty of the task or the lack of "self-talk" to mediate action. In this study, we required two teenagers with NLD and two control group teenagers to touch the thumb of each hand firmly and accurately to the fingertips of the same hand, in an order specified by verbal or tactile instruction. Brain activity patterns (measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging) suggest that unlike control participants, the NLD participants used internalized speech to facilitate the novel task only when instructions were verbal. NLD participants also showed activity in a more widely distributed network of neural structures. These findings provide preliminary evidence for remediation strategies that encourage internal speech. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 25643857)

    Case Illustration of a Boy With Nonverbal Learning Disorder and Asperger's Features: Neuropsychological and Personality Assessment. By: Yalof, Jed. Journal of Personality Assessment, Aug2006, Vol. 87 Issue 1, p15-34, 20p, 5 charts Abstract: I present a case study of a latency-age boy referred for assessment of a nonverbal learning disability/disorder (NLD) who also had features of Asperger's syndrome (AS). I review NLD terminology, presumed brain–behavior relationship, neuropsychological profile, and diagnosis/classification issues. I discuss the challenge of differentiating NLD from AS in relation to the client's pattern of visual-spatial, communication, social-emotional, and behavioral NLD correlates. I integrate neuropsychological and personality assessment data with interviews, observations, prior testing, and input from teacher and therapist in formulating a diagnostic impression. I discuss Rorschach (Exner, 2003) and neuropsychological consultations in relation to subtle language and interpersonal features of the client's communication style. I provide parent feedback at 18 and 24 months posttesting. I discuss implications relative to a model of school neuropsychological assessment that includes the Rorschach test. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1207/s15327752jpa8701_02 (AN 21656063)

    Maternal Stress in Nonverbal Learning Disorder: A Comparison With Reading Disorder. By: Antshel, Kevin M.; Joseph, Guy-Ronald. Journal of Learning Disabilities, May/Jun2006, Vol. 39 Issue 3, p194-205, 12p Abstract: Maternal stress was assessed in mothers of children ages 8 to 11 years with learning disorders (LD). Age-, gender-, and IQ-matched children with reading disorders (RD; n = 31), children with nonverbal learning disorders (NVLD; n = 21), and typically developing control participants (n = 23) participated. Mothers of children with LD reported higher levels of stress, although the specific nature of the stress appeared to vary by disorder subtype: Mothers of children with RD reported higher levels of general distress, whereas mothers of children with NVLD reported higher levels of dysfunctional interactions with their child. The severity of the LD was strongly associated with maternal stress in the sample of children with NVLD but not in the sample of children with RD. In the sample of children with NVLD, the best predictors of maternal stress were 2 variables associated with the child: The lower the child's Performance IQ, the higher the level of maternal stress. Furthermore, the level of the child's internalizing symptoms was also a strong predictor of maternal stress in the sample of children with NVLD. In our sample of children with RD, the 3 best predictors were all variables associated with the mother, including her age, her level of reported psychiatric symptoms, and her overall level of social support. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 20725163)

    Memory Profile of Children with Nonverbal Learning Disability. By: Liddell, Glennis A.; Rasmussen, Carmen. Learning Disabilities Research & Practice (Blackwell Publishing Limited), Aug2005, Vol. 20 Issue 3, p137-141, 5p, 2 charts Abstract: The aim of this study was to compare visual and verbal memory in children with nonverbal learning disability (NLD) using the Children's Memory Scale and to identify the profile of strengths and weaknesses in visual memory abilities. Performance was significantly lower on measures of visual than verbal memory, indicating that children with NLD have deficits in visual memory despite adequate verbal memory. A unique pattern of performance emerged for the visual but not the verbal subtests. Performance on the Faces Immediate subtest was well below average, although other measures of visual memory were within the average range. Hence, it appears that children with NLD have a specific deficit on immediate memory for faces. This facial memory deficit may be linked to a deficit in right hemisphere functioning, which has already been implicated in facial processing and may also be linked with other disorders (e.g., autism spectrum disorder) in which similar facial processing deficits have been documented. More research is needed to further understand the visual memory profile of children with NLD and to inform instruction and remediation. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1540-5826.2005.00128.x (AN 17450217)

    When Asperger's Syndrome and a Nonverbal Learning Disability Look Alike. By: Stein, Martin T.; Klin, Ami; Miller, Karen. Pediatrics, Nov2004 Supplement Part 3 of 3, Vol. 114, p1458-1463, 6p; Abstract: Presents a care report of a boy exhibiting behavior suggestive of Asperger's syndrome (AS) and nonverbal learning disability (NLD). Early-onset patterns of children with AS, including awkward social approaches; Information on NLD, a neurological syndrome involving the right hemisphere dysfunction of the brain; Overlap between the symptoms of AS and NLD. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2004-1721L (AN 14787124)

    The Utility of Math Difficulties, Internalized Psychopathology, and Visual-Spatial Deficits to Identify Children With the Nonverbal Learning Disability Syndrome: Evidence for a Visualspatial Disability. By: Forrest, Bonny J.. Child Neuropsychology, Jun2004, Vol. 10 Issue 2, p129-146, 18p Abstract: This study examined the criteria currently employed to identify children with the nonverbal learning disability syndrome (NVLD). The most widely accepted definition of NVLD relies on deficits in visual-spatial-organizational, tactile-perceptual, psychomotor, and nonverbal problem-solving skills. These deficits are believed to coexist with strengths in rote verbal learning. phoneme-grapheme matching, verbal output, and verbal classification. The combination of these assets and deficits has been hypothesized to lead to psychosocial and academic problems, including difficulties with mathematics and increased rates of psychopathology. This study compared performance of three groups of children: those with NVLD, those with verbal learning disabilities (VLD), and controls. The results show that the criteria currently employed to identify children with NVLD may not adequately differentiate them, in contrast to previous findings, the study reveals that children with NVLD can demonstrate good math abilities when performing certain types of math tasks, especially those that draw on their robust verbal skills. Also in contrast to most previous findings, in this study children with NVLD (and normal controls) demonstrated lower rates of psychopathology than children with VLD. Finally, for children with NVLD it appears that their visual-perceptual deficits may include a primary deficit in locating objects in space. Based in part on the findings of this study, it may be helpful for diagnostic and treatment purposes to reserve the term Nonverbal Learning Disability for children whose visual-spatial deficits are primary and severe enough to affect academic performance in subjects such as written mathematics. Given the integral nature of social relations in children's lives, a separate category (e.g., social processing disorder) could be created for children whose social skills deficits are primary and impair their social interactions. A broader nonverbal learning model or... [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 14957308)

    A Rapid Screening Measure for the Identification of Visuospatial Learning Disability in Schools. By: Cornoldi, Cesare; Venneri, Annalena; Marconato, Fabio; Molin, Adriana; Montinari, Cinzia. Journal of Learning Disabilities, Jul/Aug2003, Vol. 36 Issue 4, p299, 8p Abstract: Verbal and nonverbal forms of developmental learning disabilities have been reported. Whereas there are several instruments for evaluating children for the presence of verbal learning disabilities at school, no screening tool is available to identify children who have nonverbal learning disabilities. This study aimed at devising and validating a short screening questionnaire that can be used by teachers in primary schools to identify those children who need to be referred for clinical services because they have a visuospatial learning disability (VSLD). An 18-item Shortened Visuospatial Questionnaire (SVS) was derived from an earlier, longer version. Its validation procedure was twofold and was achieved by (a) verifying that children who had been identified with the SVS questionnaire as having a VSLD actually showed visuospatial deficits on psychometric evaluation and by (b) rating with the SVS a clinically identified population of children with VSLD. The results of the validation procedure showed that the SVS is a quick, reliable, and valid instrument that may be helpful in identifying children with VSLD in primary school. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 10139034)

    MIDDLE-CLASS MOTHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF PEER AND SIBLING VICTIMIZATION AMONG CHILDREN WITH ASPERGER'S SYNDROME AND NONVERBAL LEARNING DISORDERS. By: Little, Liza. Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing, Jan-Mar2002, Vol. 25 Issue 1, p43-57, 15p Abstract: This article describes the yearly prevalence and frequency of peer and sibling victimization as reported by a large national sample of middle-class mothers of children with Asperger's syndrome and nonverbal learning disorders. An anonymous, mailed survey was sent to families solicited from two national Internet sites for parents of children with Asperger's and nonverbal learning disorders using the Comprehensive Juvenile Victimization scale and three questions designed to measure peer shunning. The overall prevalence rate reported by mothers of peer victimization was 94%. Mothers reported that almost three-quarters of their children had been hit by peers or siblings in the past year and 75% had been emotionally bullied. On the more severe end of peer victimization, 10% of the children were attacked by a gang in the past year and 15% were victims of nonsexual assaults to the genitals. Peer shunning also was common. A third of the children had not been invited to a single birthday party in the past year, and many were eating alone at lunch or were picked last for teams. Peer shunning was significantly correlated with peer bullying and assault. The high rates of peer shunning and peer victimization reported suggest that children with Asperger's and nonverbal learning disorders may require further scrutiny and attention concerning their victimization experiences by peers and siblings. Implications for nursing professionals are reviewed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/014608602753504847 (AN 6311655)

    Learning Disabilities and Psychosocial Adjustment: A Critical Review. By: Greenham, Stephanie L.. Child Neuropsychology, Sep99, Vol. 5 Issue 3, p171-196, 26p Abstract: Research is reviewed that assesses the extent to which difficulties in psychosocial adjustment are characteristic of broadly defined learning disabilities (LD) and of specific patterns of academic and neuropsychological assets and deficits (Rourke & Fuerst, 1991; Spreen, 1989). Overall, a majority of children and adolescents with LD are in the normal range of peer acceptance and socially competent behaviour. Some measure of difficulty in these social assessments is observed in approximately one third of children and adolescents with LD, compared with 10 to 15% of non-LD controls. Similarly, internalized emotional symptoms of depression and anxiety are assessed as somewhat higher for individuals with LD than for non-LD controls but are within the normal range of scores. Externalized emotional behaviours, specifically aggression, delinquency, and hyperactivity, are problematic but these too are at subclinical levels. In the few studies that examine psychosocial adjustment for subtypes of LD, there is some evidence that individuals with nonverbal learning disabilities (NLD) are at much greater risk for personality disturbance and behaviour problems. That the psychosocial adjustment of individuals with reading disabilities is within the range of non-LD controls remains to be convincingly demonstrated. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 5239721)

    Mandatemi un PM con la vostra mail e ve li mando

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  4. #4
    Postatore Compulsivo L'avatar di Calethiel
    Data registrazione
    19-04-2005
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    Citazione Originalmente inviato da Tottola1 Visualizza messaggio
    Ciao,benvenuta sul forum! Prova a leggere "Guida alla sindrome di Asperger" di T. Atwood edizioni Erikson,è fatto piuttosto bene.
    La sindrome di asperger non è la stessa cosa della sindrome non verbale. Hanno entrambe un problema nella pragmatica, ma nella sindrome no verbale ci sono problemi motori/prassici e attentivi, mentre in quella di asperger il problema è più incentrato sulla comunicazione.

    Mentre il saggio indica la luna, lo stolto guarda il dito

    Non ti curar di loro, ma guarda oltre e passa

  5. #5
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di Tottola1
    Data registrazione
    23-06-2007
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    Nord Italia
    Messaggi
    249
    Citazione Originalmente inviato da Calethiel Visualizza messaggio
    La sindrome di asperger non è la stessa cosa della sindrome non verbale. Hanno entrambe un problema nella pragmatica, ma nella sindrome no verbale ci sono problemi motori/prassici e attentivi, mentre in quella di asperger il problema è più incentrato sulla comunicazione.
    hai fatto bene a precisare,ma il testo in questione offre comunque suggerimenti adeguati.
    ciao ciao

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