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Visualizzazione risultati 1 fino 7 di 7
  1. #1
    atany866
    Ospite non registrato

    tesi.......aiutoooo........please!!!!!!!!!!

    Ciao a tutti mi kiamo Anna,
    sono all'ultimo anno e tra breve chiederò la tesi, ma...OVVIAMENTE......ho qlk problema con l'argomento....!vi informo subito che mi piacerebbe trattare temi relativi all'età evolutiva...avevo pensato alla fobia sociale in età infantile oppure trattare la scarsa fiducia del sè nel bambino e qnt questa influenza il suo agito...ma non so!!!che ne pensate?...suggerimenti?ma soprattutto sapete dove posso reperire del materiale per approfondire qst 2 temi?
    ah accetto anke suggerimenti su altri temi naturalmente
    grazie mille a tttt
    un bacio

  2. #2
    Partecipante
    Data registrazione
    17-04-2008
    Residenza
    Palermo/Catania
    Messaggi
    38
    innanzitutto scegli l approccio e il prof.
    di età evolutiva nè parlano in tnt .. potresti affrontare sia il tema della fobia sociale ke ql dell'autostima e/o self efficacy sotto un punto di vista orientativo/scolastico.ti interesserebbe?

  3. #3
    atany866
    Ospite non registrato
    beh si, certo che mi interesserebbe, sarebbe un bel tema....solo che la self efficacy è un argomento che non ho trattato molto nel mio percorso di studio e qst mi frena 1pò! per qnt riguarda il prof ho gia scelto quello, a mio parere,più adatto!
    cmq grazie mille per la risp....6 stato davvero gentilissimo

  4. #4
    Partecipante
    Data registrazione
    17-04-2008
    Residenza
    Palermo/Catania
    Messaggi
    38
    Citazione Originalmente inviato da atany866 Visualizza messaggio
    beh si, certo che mi interesserebbe, sarebbe un bel tema....solo che la self efficacy è un argomento che non ho trattato molto nel mio percorso di studio e qst mi frena 1pò! per qnt riguarda il prof ho gia scelto quello, a mio parere,più adatto!
    cmq grazie mille per la risp....6 stato davvero gentilissimo
    prego... cmq sn una "lei"

  5. #5
    atany866
    Ospite non registrato
    Ops....scusami......beh allora 6 stata gentilissima!
    grazie ancora

  6. #6
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281
    College Dating and Social Anxiety: Using the Internet as a Means of Connecting to Others. By: Stevens, Sarah B.; Morris, Tracy L.. CyberPsychology & Behavior, Oct2007, Vol. 10 Issue 5, p680-688, 9p, 1 chart Abstract: With the advent and widespread use of the Internet, various online media are being used to connect and maintain social relationships in individuals of all ages. Social relationships are vital to healthy development, and individuals with social and/or dating anxiety may have marked difficulty in establishing appropriate, supportive relationships because of fear of negative evaluation by others. For these individuals, the Internet may open avenues of communication and provide an outlet through which relationships can be formed and preserved. This study investigated the characteristics of computer and Internet use in young adults to determine whether individuals who were high in social/dating anxiety symptoms were more likely to make and maintain social relationships online. To further understand the patterns of these behaviors, several measures of social and dating anxiety were collected and analyzed along with demographic, computer use, and relationship characteristics. Results indicated differences between high and low social/dating anxiety with respect to media use and relationship formation. Limitations and future directions are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1089/cpb.2007.9970 (AN 27010444)

    Add AddedSpecificity of interpretation and judgemental biases in social phobia versus depression. By: Voncken, M. J.; Bögels, S. M.; Peeters, F.. Psychology & Psychotherapy: Theory, Research & Practice, Sep2007, Vol. 80 Issue 3, p443-453, 11p Abstract: Objectives. A body of studies shows that social phobia is characterized by content specific interpretation and judgmental biases. That is, they show bias in social situations but not in non-social situations. Comorbid depression, one of the major comorbid disorders in social phobia, might account for these biases in social phobia since depression also is characterized by cognitive distortions in social situations. This study hypothesized that, despite comorbid depression, patients with social phobia would suffer from contentspecific biases. Design. Participants filled out the Interpretation and Judgmental Questionnaire (IJQ) to assess interpretation bias (using open-ended responses and forced-interpretations) and judgmental bias in social and non-social situations. Method. Four groups participated: social phobic patients with high (N = 38) and low (N = 47) depressive symptoms, depressed patients (N = 22) and normal controls (N = 33). Results. We found both social phobic groups to interpret social situations more negatively and judge social situations as more threatening than non-social situations relative to depressed patients and normal controls. As expected, depressive symptoms related to increased general interpretation and judgmental biases across social and nonsocial situations. In contrast to expectations, we did not find these patterns for the open-ended measure of interpretation bias. Conclusions. The content-specific biases for social situations distinguished social phobic patients from depressive patients. This speaks for the importance of establishing the primary diagnosis in patients with mixed depression and social anxiety complaints. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1348/147608306X161890 (AN 27166418)

    Psychometric evaluation of the mini-social phobia inventory (Mini-SPIN) in a treatment-seeking sample. By: Weeks, Justin W.; Spokas, Megan E.; Heimberg, Richard G.. Depression & Anxiety (1091-4269), 2007, Vol. 24 Issue 6, p382-391, 10p Abstract: The Mini-Social Phobia Inventory (Mini-SPIN) is a 3-item, self-rated screening instrument to assess social anxiety disorder, but its psychometric properties have not yet been examined in a sample seeking treatment for psychiatric disorders. We analyzed responses from 291 adults who telephoned the Adult Anxiety Clinic of Temple (AACT) seeking treatment for social anxiety or generalized anxiety and worry. The Mini-SPIN demonstrated strong internal consistency. Support for the convergent validity of the Mini-SPIN was provided by moderate correlations with several self-report measures and a clinician-administered measure of social anxiety completed by the subsample of callers who later came to the AACT for evaluation. Furthermore, the Mini-SPIN correlated significantly with two of three measures of functional disability, but not with a measure of life satisfaction. Correlations with measures of other constructs were nonsignificant, providing support for the discriminant validity of the Mini-SPIN. In addition, a cutoff score of 6 on the Mini-SPIN yielded strong sensitivity and diagnostic efficiency in the subsample of treatment seekers that later completed pretreatment evaluation, although the specificity of this cutoff score was not optimal in this sample. Overall, the Mini-SPIN demonstrated sound psychometric properties in this treatment-seeking sample. Depression and Anxiety 2482–391, 2007. Published 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 26382239)

    Add AddedDoes occasional cannabis use impact anxiety and depression treatment outcomes?: results from a randomized effectiveness trial. By: Bricker, Jonathan B.; Russo, Joan; Stein, Murray B.; Sherbourne, Cathy; Craske, Michelle; Schraufnagel, Trevor J.; Roy-Byrne, Peter. Depression & Anxiety (1091-4269), 2007, Vol. 24 Issue 6, p392-398, 7p Abstract: This study investigated the extent to which occasional cannabis use moderated anxiety and depression outcomes in the Collaborative Care for Anxiety and Panic (CCAP) study, a combined cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy randomized effectiveness trial. Participants were 232 adults from six university-based primary care outpatient clinics in three West Coast cities randomized to receive either the CCAP intervention or the usual care condition. Results showed significant (P<.01) evidence of an interaction between treatment group (CCAP vs. usual care) and cannabis use status (monthly vs. less than monthly) for depressive symptoms, but not for panic disorder or social phobia symptoms (all P>.05). Monthly cannabis users' depressive symptoms improved in the CCAP intervention just as much as those who used cannabis less than monthly, whereas monthly users receiving usual care had significantly more depressive symptoms than those using less than monthly. A combined CBT and medication treatment intervention may be a promising approach for the treatment of depression among occasional cannabis users. Depression and Anxiety 2492–398, 2007. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 26382237)

    The co-morbidity of eating disorders and anxiety disorders: a review. By: Swinbourne, Jessica M.; Touyz, Stephen W.. European Eating Disorders Review, Jul/Aug2007, Vol. 15 Issue 4, p253-274, 22p, 5 charts Abstract: Objective To critically review the literature examining the co-morbidity between eating disorders and anxiety disorders. Method A review of the literature on the co-morbidity between anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and eating disorders not otherwise specified and the anxiety disorders of OCD, PTSD, social anxiety, GAD, panic and agoraphobia. Results Of the empirical studies undertaken, it is clear that anxiety disorders are significantly more frequent in subjects with eating disorders than the general community. Researchers have shown that often anxiety disorders pre-date eating disorders, leading to a suggestion that early onset anxiety may predispose individuals to developing an eating disorder. To date however, the research presents strikingly inconsistent findings, thus complicating our understanding of eating disorder and anxiety co-morbidity. Furthermore, despite indications that eating disorder prevalence amongst individuals presenting for anxiety treatment may be high, there is a distinct lack of research in this area. Discussion This review critically examines the available research to date on the co-morbidity of eating disorders and anxiety disorders. Some of the methodological limitations of previous research are presented, in order to highlight the issues which warrant further scientific investigation in this area. Copyright &#169; 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/erv.784 (AN 25425745)

    Beyond shy: When to suspect social anxiety disorder. (cover story) By: Rosenthal, Jessica; Jacobs, Leslie; Marcus, Madalyn; Katzman, Martin A.. Journal of Family Practice, May2007, Vol. 56 Issue 5, p369-374, 6p; Abstract: The article highlights a three-point screening tool to identify whether a shy patient is suffering from social anxiety disorder. This tool assesses whether the patient's fear of embarrassment causes him or her to avoid speaking to people, whether he or she avoid activities in which he or she is the center of attention or whether looking stupid is one of his or her worst fears. Social anxiety differs from shyness in children in its ability to debilitate the child's ability to grow and develop socially in an appropriate manner. (AN 25274370)

    Changes in perfectionism following cognitive-behavioral treatment for social phobia. By: Ashbaugh, Andrea; Antony, Martin M.; Liss, Andrea; Summerfeldt, Laura J.; McCabe, Randi E.; Swinson, Richard P.. Depression & Anxiety (1091-4269), 2007, Vol. 24 Issue 3, p169-177, 9p Abstract: Previous studies have found that social phobia (social anxiety disorder) is associated with elevated levels of perfectionism, particularly concerns over making mistakes (CM) and doubts about actions (DA). This study investigated the extent to which various dimensions of perfectionism change as a result of participating in a 12-session cognitive-behavioral group treatment for social phobia. One hundred seven individuals completed the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale before and after treatment. Participants improved on several measures of social anxiety, generalized anxiety, and depression. With respect to perfectionism, significant reductions were seen on total perfectionism scores and scores on particular dimensions (CM, DA, organization), but not on other dimensions (personal standards, parental expectations, parental criticism). Furthermore, changes in DA and to some extent CM predicted posttreatment levels of social anxiety after controlling for pretreatment levels of social anxiety and changes in anxiety and depression. Implications of these findings are discussed. Depression and Anxiety 24:169–177, 2007. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/da.20219 (AN 24805122)

    Social Phobia in Youth: The Diagnostic Utility of Feared Social Situations. Puliafico, Anthony C.; Comer, Jonathan S.; Kendall, Philip C.; Psychological Assessment, Vol 19(1), Mar 2007. pp. 152-158. [Journal Article] Abstract: The present study evaluated the utility of parent- and child-reported social fears for reaching a diagnosis of social phobia in youth. The diagnostic utility of (a) the number of fears and (b) specific feared social situations was examined. The sample included 140 youth and their parents: youth diagnosed with social phobia (n = 50), youth diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder or separation anxiety disorder but not social phobia (n = 49), and youth without an anxiety disorder (n = 41). Youth and their parents were interviewed separately using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children and Parents. Analyses indicate that a cut score of 4 parent-endorsed social fears optimally distinguished youth with and without social phobia. Analyses of child-reported fears did not identify a meaningful cut score. Conditional probability and odds ratio analyses indicated that several specific social fears have high diagnostic efficiency, and others were found to have limited diagnostic efficiency. Results are discussed with regard to informing diagnostic interviews and diagnostic systems for social phobia in youth. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Specificity of autobiographical memory in social phobia and major depression. By: Heidenreich, Thomas; Junghanns-Royack, Katrin; Stangier, Ulrich. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, Mar2007, Vol. 46 Issue 1, p19-33, 15p Abstract: Objectives. Several studies have found evidence for overgeneral autobiographical memory in patients with major depression and other disorders. Individuals with social phobia have been found to report early memories relating to specific experiences of being depreciated or rejected. However, there are no clear results regarding specificity of autobiographical memory in social phobia to date. Design. Experimental design is quasi-experimental: Three groups were compared with regard to specificity of autobiographical memory. Emphasis was laid on matching the groups for age, gender and educational level. Methods. Following the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT) and another recent study, 10 emotional cue words of positive or negative valence were presented to 18 outpatients with social phobia without current comorbid depression, 18 outpatients with major depression without current anxiety disorder and 18 healthy control subjects in a think-aloud task. Participants were asked to report a specific autobiographical event and received sufficient training to ensure that the method had been understood. Results. Results indicated no significant differences between groups for specificity and latency of first specific response. In contrast with earlier studies, an overgeneral response style was not observed in depressed patients. However, significant differences in educational level emerged. Conclusions. Social phobics demonstrated a high ability to recall detailed specific autobiographical memories. Possible explanations for the discrepancy between our results and previous findings regarding depressed patients are discussed in terms of sample characteristics, specific modifications of the AMT-protocol and level of education. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1348/014466506X106218 (AN 24478160)

    Add AddedIntensive group cognitive treatment and individual cognitive therapy vs. treatment as usual in social phobia: a randomized controlled trial. By: Mörtberg, E.; Clark, D. M.; Sundin, Ö.; Åberg Wistedt, A.. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, Feb2007, Vol. 115 Issue 2, p142-154, 13p, 3 charts, 1 diagram, 2 graphs Abstract: Objective: To compare the effects of an intensive group cognitive treatment (IGCT) to individual cognitive therapy (ICT) and treatment as usual (TAU) in social phobia (DSM-IV). Method: Hundred patients were randomized to: IGCT involving 16 group sessions spread over three weeks; ICT involving 16 shorter weekly sessions in 4 months and; TAU involving an indicated selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) with therapy sessions as required for 1 year. The main outcome measure was a Social Phobia Composite that combined several standardized self-report measures. Diagnostic assessment was repeated at 1-year follow-up. Results: Significant improvements were observed with all treatments. ICT was superior to IGCT and TAU, which did not differ in overall effectiveness. Conclusion: The study confirms and extends previously reported findings that ICT is more effective than group cognitive treatment and treatment with SSRIs. IGCT lasts only 3 weeks, and is as effective as more protracted TAU. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0447.2006.00839.x (AN 23697333)


    Buona vita

    e buona tesi

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  7. #7
    atany866
    Ospite non registrato

    grazie willy

    grazie mille willy....6 stato di grande aiuto...cercherò e darò un'okkiata agli articoli ke mi hai indicato, credo che in particolare quello sulla social phobia in youth può essermi utile.
    ancora grazie
    un bacio

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