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  1. #1
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di spezzina 76
    Data registrazione
    12-01-2007
    Residenza
    La Spezia
    Messaggi
    152

    Tesi: l'elaborazione del lutto.

    Salve a tutti, vorrei fare una tesi sull'elaborazione del lutto, con una prima parte dedicata alla presentazione delle ipotesi di vari psicologi. Sapete indicarmi qualche testo che raccolga varie interpretazioni dell'elaborazione del lutto? Grazie in anticipo.

  2. #2
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281
    Evidence-based practices for parentally bereaved children and their families. Haine, Rachel A.; Ayers, Tim S.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, Vol 39(2), Apr 2008. pp. 113-121. [Journal Article] Abstract: Parental death is 1 of the most traumatic events that can occur in childhood, and several reviews of the literature have found that the death of a parent places children at risk for a number of negative outcomes. This article describes the knowledge base regarding both empirically supported, malleable factors that have been shown to contribute to or protect children from mental health problems following the death of a parent and evidence-based practices to change these factors. In addition, nonmealleable factors clinicians should consider when providing services for children who have experienced the death of a parent are reviewed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

    Regret resolution, aging, and adapting to loss. Torges, Cynthia M.; Stewart, Abigail J.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan; Psychology and Aging, Vol 23(1), Mar 2008. pp. 169-180. [Journal Article] Abstract: Both theory and empirical evidence suggest that people who have unresolved regrets experience lower levels of well-being than do those who resolve their regrets. In this study, the authors examined the role of regret resolution during bereavement by assessing whether (a) regret resolution would aid in adapting to the death of a loved one and (b) older adults would be more successful at resolving their bereavement-related regrets than would younger adults. Mixed models were run with longitudinal data from an age-heterogeneous sample of 147 men and women who were eventually bereaved after providing care for a loved one through a hospice. As expected, regret resolution contributed to adjustment as indicated by postloss patterns of depressive symptoms, well-being, and rumination; further, older adults were more likely to resolve their regrets than were younger adults. Implications for encouraging regret resolution early in bereavement are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

    Exploring Themes of Resiliency in Children After the Death of a Parent. By: Eppler, Christie. Professional School Counseling, Feb2008, Vol. 11 Issue 3, p189-196, 8p Abstract: The purpose of the phenomenological and grounded qualitative study in this article was to explore resilient traits of children, aged 9 to 12, who experienced the death of a parent within the past 36 months. The researcher assisted the children in narrating and writing their stories about parental loss and adaptation by. posing questions guided by a review of literature framed in an ecological context. Data were coded and analyzed, uncovering themes of resilience. Implications for school counselors working with students who have parental grief experiences are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 30096581)

    Through a glass darkly: Reflections on therapist transformations. Callahan, Jennifer L.; Dittloff, Mark; Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, Vol 38(6), Dec 2007. pp. 547-553. [Journal Article] Abstract: Psychologists are not immune to unfortunate, potentially devastating, life-changing events. The following article explores how a shared event, the loss of a child, impacted 2 different therapists and describes their individual changes in therapeutic perspectives and approaches. Vulnerabilities and lessons of resiliency are presented, with the direct impact on psychological practice discussed. The authors conclude that encountering personal struggles or challenges can have a transforming influence on therapists, including how therapists conceptualize and interact with their clients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

    Levels of specificity of autobiographical memories and of biographical memories of the deceased in bereaved individuals with and without complicated grief. Golden, Ann-Marie; Dalgleish, Tim; Mackintosh, Bundy; Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Vol 116(4), Nov 2007. pp. 786-795. [Journal Article] Abstract: Traumatized individuals experiencing posttraumatic stress have difficulty retrieving specific autobiographical memories to cue words on the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT; J. M. G. Williams & K. Broadbent, 1986). This may represent a generalized, functional avoidance of the personal past. However, such individuals also often report specific intrusive memories of their trauma in the day-to-day. This raises the possibility that memories tied to the source of the person's distress are immune to this putative avoidance process. This was investigated in bereaved individuals with complicated grief (CG) who reported intrusive, specific memories from the life of their deceased loved one, and matched bereaved controls without CG. Participants performed the AMT and two Biographical Memory Tests (BMTs), cueing memories from the life of the deceased (BMT-Deceased) and from a living significant other (BMT-Living). To negative word cues, the CG group showed reduced specificity for the AMT and BMT-Living, relative to controls, but this effect was reversed on the BMT-Deceased. These data support the proposal that memories tied to the source of an individual's distress are immune to the processes that underlie the standard reduced specificity effect. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Coping with Bereavement. By: Hansson, Robert O.; Stroebe, Margaret S.. Generations, Fall2007, Vol. 31 Issue 3, p63-65, 3p; Abstract: The article discusses the influences on how bereaved individuals deal with the death of the partner. The authors present a model, which embraces both loss-oriented and restoration-oriented emotional and practical challenges, to help grieving people understand their reactions and identify effective ways of dealing with them. It is stated that the death of a loved one can be devastating. They note that some individuals experience a grief of greater intensity or duration and may be candidates for professional intervention. (AN 28039281)

    Coping style use predicts posttraumatic stress and complicated grief symptom severity among college students reporting a traumatic loss. Schnider, Kimberly R.; Elhai, Jon D.; Gray, Matt J.; Journal of Counseling Psychology, Vol 54(3), Jul 2007. Special issue: Racial and ethnic identity theory, measurement, and research in counseling psychology: Present status and future directions. pp. 344-350. [Journal Article] Abstract: Problem-focused coping, and active and avoidant emotional coping were examined as correlates of grief and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity among 123 college students reporting the unexpected death of an immediate family member, romantic partner, or very close friend. The authors administered to participants, via the Internet, 5 survey instruments that measured demographic characteristics, traumatic event exposure (Stressful Life Events Screening Questionnaire; L. Goodman, C. Corcoran, K. Turner, N. Yuan, & B. L. Green, 1998), complicated grief (CG) severity (Inventory of Complicated Grief--Revised--Short Form; A. E. Latham & H. G. Prigerson, 2004; H. G. Prigerson & S. C. Jacobs, 2001), PTSD severity (PTSD Checklist; F. W. Weathers, B. T. Litz, D. S. Herman, J. A. Huska, & T. M. Keane, 1993), and coping style use (Brief COPE; C. S. Carver, 1997). Results demonstrated that CG and PTSD severity were both significantly positively correlated with problem-focused, and active and avoidant emotional coping styles. The authors used path analysis to control for time since the loss and trauma frequency and found that only avoidant emotional coping remained significant in predicting CG and PTSD severity. Results are discussed in terms of their clinical implications for treating individuals with traumatic losses. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    In sickness and health: Learning goodbye. Crawford-Faucher, Amy; Families, Systems, & Health, Vol 25(2), Jun 2007. pp. 236-237. [Journal Article] Abstract: This article discusses the author's experience dealing with death and loss within in her family and as an intern working in a Cardiac Care Unit. For the author, with critically ill patients arriving and leaving in different degrees of distress, it was hard to acknowledge the person who encompassed each patient. However, it was not until the illness and loss of her aunt did she acknowledge such of a process. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Do religious or spiritual beliefs influence bereavement? A systematic review. By: Becker, Gerhild; Xander, Carola J.; Blum, Hubert E.; Lutterbach, Johannes; Momm, Felix; Gysels, Marjolein; Higginson, Irene J.. Palliative Medicine, May2007, Vol. 21 Issue 3, p207-217, 11p Abstract: Background: Responses to bereavement may be influenced by characteristics such as age or gender, but also by factors like culture and religion. Aim: A systematic review was undertaken to assess whether spiritual or religious beliefs alter the process of grief and/or bereavement. Methods: Fifteen computerized databases were searched. Thirty-two studies met the inclusion criteria. Evidence was graded according to the standard grading system of the Clinical Outcomes Group and by the SIGNAL score. Results: In total, 5715 persons were examined: 69% women, 87% white, 83% protestant. Ninety-four percent of studies show some positive effects of religious/spiritual beliefs on bereavement, but there was a great heterogeneity regarding included populations and outcome measurements. Conclusion: Available data do not allow for a definite answer on whether religious/spiritual beliefs effectively influence bereavement as most studies suffer from weaknesses in design and methodological flaws. Further research is needed. Recommendations for further research are given. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 25560207)

    Per iniziare...

    Buona vita e buona tesi

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  3. #3
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di spezzina 76
    Data registrazione
    12-01-2007
    Residenza
    La Spezia
    Messaggi
    152
    Oddio, non sono così abile con l'Inglese, comunque grazie per la risposta.

  4. #4
    Partecipante Esperto L'avatar di Bellatrix
    Data registrazione
    30-01-2006
    Residenza
    Bologna
    Messaggi
    296
    io ti consiglierei di leggere qualcosa del Prof. Francesco Campione

  5. #5
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di spezzina 76
    Data registrazione
    12-01-2007
    Residenza
    La Spezia
    Messaggi
    152
    Grazie Bellatrix, darò un'occhiata in rete ai titoli.

  6. #6

    Riferimento: Tesi: l'elaborazione del lutto.

    salve a tutti, devo scrivere la tesi su "valutazione dei traumi e lutti infantili nell'adulto con l'AAI" mi sto basando sui testi della Crittenden..ma adesso dovrei trovare del materiale sui Modelli Operativi Interni e sul lutto, e su chi ha parlato di lutto nella storia della psicologia dopo Freud...sapete aiutarmi??

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