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Discussione: mi date un consiglio?

  1. #1
    sweetmelody
    Ospite non registrato

    mi date un consiglio?

    ciao ragazzi!nella tesi dovrei parlare delle aree del cervello che interessano la memoria di lavoro e a lungo termine..mi servirebbe perciò un libro valido e soprattutto recente.cosa mi consigliate?grazie

  2. #2
    Partecipante Esperto L'avatar di Bellatrix
    Data registrazione
    30-01-2006
    Residenza
    Bologna
    Messaggi
    296
    io ti consiglierei "fisiologia del comportamento" del carlson...
    Ultima modifica di Bellatrix : 07-04-2008 alle ore 13.50.17 Motivo: titolo sbagliato

  3. #3
    sweetmelody
    Ospite non registrato

    ok

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da Bellatrix Visualizza messaggio
    io ti consiglierei "fisiologia del comportamento" del carlson...
    Grazie per avermi risposto..ok lo cerco in biblio..

  4. #4
    sweetmelody
    Ospite non registrato

    fisiologia del comportamento

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da Bellatrix Visualizza messaggio
    io ti consiglierei "fisiologia del comportamento" del carlson...
    ciao..ho preso il testo che mi hai consigliato..allora..è spiegato in maniera chiara..è ben organizzato..però non è un libro recente ,infatti molte spiegazioni che fornisce sono "superate"..cmq..se ti dovessi ricordare di altri testi io accetto i consigli..grazie

  5. #5
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281
    Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Dissociates Working Memory Manipulation from Retention Functions in the Prefrontal, but not Posterior Parietal, Cortex. By: Postle, Bradley R.; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Hamidi, Massihullah; Feredoes, Eva; Massimini, Marcello; Peterson, Michael; Alexander, Andrew; Tononi, Giulio. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Oct2006, Vol. 18 Issue 10, p1712-1722, 11p Abstract: Understanding the contributions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) to working memory is central to understanding the neural bases of high-level cognition. One question that remains controversial is whether the same areas of the dorsolateral PFC (dlPFC) that participate in the manipulation of information in working memory also contribute to its short-term retention (STR). We evaluated this question by first identifying, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), brain areas involved in manipulation. Next, these areas were targeted with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) while subjects performed tasks requiring only the STR or the STR plus manipulation of information in working memory. fMRI indicated that manipulation-related activity was independent of retention-related activity in both the PFC and superior parietal lobule (SPL). rTMS, however, yielded a different pattern of results. Although rTMS of the dlPFC selectively disrupted manipulation, rTMS of the SPL disrupted manipulation and STR to the same extent. rTMS of the postcentral gyrus (a control region) had no effect on performance. The implications of these results are twofold. In the PFC, they are consistent with the view that this region contributes more importantly to the control of information in working memory than to its STR. In the SPL, they illustrate the importance of supplementing the fundamentally correlational data from neuroimaging with a disruptive method, which affords stronger inference about structure-function relations. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 22699695)

    Making Working Memory Work: A Computational Model of Learning in the Prefrontal Cortex and Basal Ganglia. By: O'Reilly, Randall C.; Frank, Michael J.. Neural Computation, Feb2006, Vol. 18 Issue 2, p283-328, 46p Abstract: The prefrontal cortex has long been thought to subserve both working memory (the holding of information online for processing) and executive functions (deciding how to manipulate working memory and perform processing). Although many computational models of working memory have been developed, the mechanistic basis of executive function remains elusive, often amounting to a homunculus. This article presents an attempt to deconstruct this homunculus through powerful learning mechanisms that allow a computational model of the prefrontal cortex to control both itself and other brain areas in a strategic, task-appropriate manner. These learning mechanisms are based on subcortical structures in the midbrain, basal ganglia, and amygdala, which together form an actor-critic architecture. The critic system learns which prefrontal representations are task relevant and trains the actor, which in turn provides a dynamic gating mechanism for controlling working memory updating. Computationally, the learning mechanism is designed to simultaneously solve the temporal and structural credit assignment problems. The model's performance compares favorably with standard backpropagation-based temporal learning mechanisms on the challenging 1-2-AX working memory task and other benchmark working memory tasks. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1162/089976606775093909 (AN 19099466)

    The Functional Organization of Auditory Working Memory as Revealed by fMRI. By: Arnott, Stephen R.; Grady, Cheryl L.; Hevenor, Stephanie J.; Graham, Simon; Alain, Claude. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, May2005, Vol. 17 Issue 5, p819-831, 13p Abstract: Spatial and nonspatial auditory tasks preferentially recruit dorsal and ventral brain areas, respectively. However, the extent to which these auditory differences reflect specific aspects of mental processing has not been directly studied. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment, participants encoded and maintained either the location or the identity of a sound for a delay period of several seconds and then subsequently compared that information with a second sound. Relative to sound localization, sound identification was associated with greater hemodynamic activity in the left rostral superior temporal gyrus. In contrast, localizing sounds recruited greater activity in the parietal cortex, posterior temporal lobe, and superior frontal sulcus. The identification differences were most prominent during the early stage of the trial, whereas the location differences were most evident during the late (i.e., comparison) stage. Accordingly, our results suggest that auditory spatial and identity dissociations as revealed by functional imaging may be dependent to some degree on the type of processing being carried out. In addition, dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral superior parietal areas showed greater activity during the comparison as opposed to the earlier stage of the trial, regardless of the type of auditory task, consistent with results from visual working memory studies. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1162/0898929053747612 (AN 16875133)

    Processes of Working Memory in Mind and Brain. By: Jonides, John; Lacey, Steven C.; Nee, Derek Evan. Current Directions in Psychological Science, Feb2005, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p2-5, 4p Abstract: Working memory is often conceptualized as storage buffers that retain information briefly, rehearsal processes that refresh the buffers, and executive processes that manipulate the contents of the buffers. We review evidence about the brain mechanisms that may underlie storage and rehearsal in working memory. We hypothesize that storage is mediated by the same brain structures that process perceptual information and that rehearsal engages a network of brain areas that also controls attention to external stimuli. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.0963-7214.2005.00323.x (AN 15998896)

    Changes of P300 Elicited during a Working Memory Test in Individuals with Depersonalization-Derealization Experiences. By: Papageorgiou, Charalabos; Ventouras, Erricos; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos; Rabavilas, Andreas; Stefanis, Costas. Neuropsychobiology, 2002, Vol. 46 Issue 2, p70-75, 6p Abstract: Background/Aim: The P300 component of Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) is related to fundamental aspects of cognitive functions, such as Working Memory (WM) and attention allocation. Deficits in these domains have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depersonalization-derealization (DD). The present study focused on the P300 elicited during a WM test in transient DD experiences. Methods: Fifteen subjects with transient DD experiences were matched for age, sex and educational level to an equal number of healthy controls. Both groups were submitted to a computerized version of the digit span Wechsler batteries. P300 was measured during the anticipatory period of this test. All participants completed the Dixon self-rating questionnaire. Results: In relation to the control group, the subjects with transient DD experiences showed significantly decreased amplitudes of P300 at central posterior brain areas. Concerning memory performance, the groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: These findings may indicate that subjects with transient DD experiences manifest altered aspects of information processing, as reflected by P300 amplitudes elicited during a WM test. Additionally, P300 might serve as a valuable investigative tool for a more comprehensive understanding of the neurobiological substrate of DD.Copyright © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1159/000065415 (AN 11372710)

    The Neural Substrate of Orientation Working Memory. By: Cornette, L.; Dupont, P.; Salmon, E.; Orban, Guy A.. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 8/15/2001, Vol. 13 Issue 6, p813-828, 16p, 1 diagram, 3 graphs, 1bw Abstract: We have used positron emission tomography (PET) to identify the neural substrate of two major cognitive components of working memory (WM), maintenance and manipulation of a single elementary visual attribute, i.e., the orientation of a grating presented in central vision. This approach allowed us to equate difficulty across tasks and prevented subjects from using verbal strategies or vestibular cues. Maintenance of orientations involved a distributed fronto-parietal network, that is, left and right lateral superior frontal sulcus (SFSl), bilateral ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), bilateral precuneus, and right superior parietal lobe (SPL). A more medial superior frontal sulcus region (SFSm) was identified as being instrumental in the manipulative operation of updating orientations retained in the WM. Functional connectivity analysis revealed that orientation WM relies on a coordinated interaction between frontal and parietal regions. In general, the current findings confirm the distinction between maintenance and manipulative processes, highlight the functional heterogeneity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), and suggest a more dynamic view of WM as a process requiring the coordinated interaction of anatomically distinct brain areas. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1162/08989290152541476 (AN 5324053)

    Verbal Working Memory Load Affects Regional Brain Activation as Measured by PET. By: Jonides, John. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Jul97, Vol. 9 Issue 4, p462, 14p, 4 charts, 1 diagram, 5 graphs, 1bw Abstract: We report an experiment that assesses the effect of variations in memory load on brain activations that mediate verbal working memory. The paradigm that forms the basis of this experiment is the “n-back” task in which subjects must decide for each letter in a series whether it matches the one presented n items back in the series. This task is of interest because it recruits processes involved in both the storage and manipulation of information in working memory. Variations in task difficulty were accomplished by varying the value of n. As n increased, subjects showed poorer behavioral performance as well as monotonically increasing magnitudes of brain activation in a large number of sites that together have been identified with verbal working-memory processes. By contrast, there was no reliable increase in activation in sites that are unrelated to working memory. These results validate the use of parametric manipulation of task variables in neuroimaging research, and they converge with the subtraction paradigm used most often in neuroimaging. In addition, the data support a model of working memory that includes both storage and executive processes that recruit a network of brain areas, all of which are involved in task performance. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 6826810)

    Vedi un po' se ti possono essere utili

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  6. #6
    sweetmelody
    Ospite non registrato

    grazie

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da willy61 Visualizza messaggio
    Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Dissociates Working Memory Manipulation from Retention Functions in the Prefrontal, but not Posterior Parietal, Cortex. By: Postle, Bradley R.; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Hamidi, Massihullah; Feredoes, Eva; Massimini, Marcello; Peterson, Michael; Alexander, Andrew; Tononi, Giulio. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Oct2006, Vol. 18 Issue 10, p1712-1722, 11p Abstract: Understanding the contributions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) to working memory is central to understanding the neural bases of high-level cognition. One question that remains controversial is whether the same areas of the dorsolateral PFC (dlPFC) that participate in the manipulation of information in working memory also contribute to its short-term retention (STR). We evaluated this question by first identifying, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), brain areas involved in manipulation. Next, these areas were targeted with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) while subjects performed tasks requiring only the STR or the STR plus manipulation of information in working memory. fMRI indicated that manipulation-related activity was independent of retention-related activity in both the PFC and superior parietal lobule (SPL). rTMS, however, yielded a different pattern of results. Although rTMS of the dlPFC selectively disrupted manipulation, rTMS of the SPL disrupted manipulation and STR to the same extent. rTMS of the postcentral gyrus (a control region) had no effect on performance. The implications of these results are twofold. In the PFC, they are consistent with the view that this region contributes more importantly to the control of information in working memory than to its STR. In the SPL, they illustrate the importance of supplementing the fundamentally correlational data from neuroimaging with a disruptive method, which affords stronger inference about structure-function relations. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 22699695)

    Making Working Memory Work: A Computational Model of Learning in the Prefrontal Cortex and Basal Ganglia. By: O'Reilly, Randall C.; Frank, Michael J.. Neural Computation, Feb2006, Vol. 18 Issue 2, p283-328, 46p Abstract: The prefrontal cortex has long been thought to subserve both working memory (the holding of information online for processing) and executive functions (deciding how to manipulate working memory and perform processing). Although many computational models of working memory have been developed, the mechanistic basis of executive function remains elusive, often amounting to a homunculus. This article presents an attempt to deconstruct this homunculus through powerful learning mechanisms that allow a computational model of the prefrontal cortex to control both itself and other brain areas in a strategic, task-appropriate manner. These learning mechanisms are based on subcortical structures in the midbrain, basal ganglia, and amygdala, which together form an actor-critic architecture. The critic system learns which prefrontal representations are task relevant and trains the actor, which in turn provides a dynamic gating mechanism for controlling working memory updating. Computationally, the learning mechanism is designed to simultaneously solve the temporal and structural credit assignment problems. The model's performance compares favorably with standard backpropagation-based temporal learning mechanisms on the challenging 1-2-AX working memory task and other benchmark working memory tasks. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1162/089976606775093909 (AN 19099466)

    The Functional Organization of Auditory Working Memory as Revealed by fMRI. By: Arnott, Stephen R.; Grady, Cheryl L.; Hevenor, Stephanie J.; Graham, Simon; Alain, Claude. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, May2005, Vol. 17 Issue 5, p819-831, 13p Abstract: Spatial and nonspatial auditory tasks preferentially recruit dorsal and ventral brain areas, respectively. However, the extent to which these auditory differences reflect specific aspects of mental processing has not been directly studied. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment, participants encoded and maintained either the location or the identity of a sound for a delay period of several seconds and then subsequently compared that information with a second sound. Relative to sound localization, sound identification was associated with greater hemodynamic activity in the left rostral superior temporal gyrus. In contrast, localizing sounds recruited greater activity in the parietal cortex, posterior temporal lobe, and superior frontal sulcus. The identification differences were most prominent during the early stage of the trial, whereas the location differences were most evident during the late (i.e., comparison) stage. Accordingly, our results suggest that auditory spatial and identity dissociations as revealed by functional imaging may be dependent to some degree on the type of processing being carried out. In addition, dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral superior parietal areas showed greater activity during the comparison as opposed to the earlier stage of the trial, regardless of the type of auditory task, consistent with results from visual working memory studies. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1162/0898929053747612 (AN 16875133)

    Processes of Working Memory in Mind and Brain. By: Jonides, John; Lacey, Steven C.; Nee, Derek Evan. Current Directions in Psychological Science, Feb2005, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p2-5, 4p Abstract: Working memory is often conceptualized as storage buffers that retain information briefly, rehearsal processes that refresh the buffers, and executive processes that manipulate the contents of the buffers. We review evidence about the brain mechanisms that may underlie storage and rehearsal in working memory. We hypothesize that storage is mediated by the same brain structures that process perceptual information and that rehearsal engages a network of brain areas that also controls attention to external stimuli. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.0963-7214.2005.00323.x (AN 15998896)

    Changes of P300 Elicited during a Working Memory Test in Individuals with Depersonalization-Derealization Experiences. By: Papageorgiou, Charalabos; Ventouras, Erricos; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos; Rabavilas, Andreas; Stefanis, Costas. Neuropsychobiology, 2002, Vol. 46 Issue 2, p70-75, 6p Abstract: Background/Aim: The P300 component of Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) is related to fundamental aspects of cognitive functions, such as Working Memory (WM) and attention allocation. Deficits in these domains have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depersonalization-derealization (DD). The present study focused on the P300 elicited during a WM test in transient DD experiences. Methods: Fifteen subjects with transient DD experiences were matched for age, sex and educational level to an equal number of healthy controls. Both groups were submitted to a computerized version of the digit span Wechsler batteries. P300 was measured during the anticipatory period of this test. All participants completed the Dixon self-rating questionnaire. Results: In relation to the control group, the subjects with transient DD experiences showed significantly decreased amplitudes of P300 at central posterior brain areas. Concerning memory performance, the groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: These findings may indicate that subjects with transient DD experiences manifest altered aspects of information processing, as reflected by P300 amplitudes elicited during a WM test. Additionally, P300 might serve as a valuable investigative tool for a more comprehensive understanding of the neurobiological substrate of DD.Copyright © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1159/000065415 (AN 11372710)

    The Neural Substrate of Orientation Working Memory. By: Cornette, L.; Dupont, P.; Salmon, E.; Orban, Guy A.. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 8/15/2001, Vol. 13 Issue 6, p813-828, 16p, 1 diagram, 3 graphs, 1bw Abstract: We have used positron emission tomography (PET) to identify the neural substrate of two major cognitive components of working memory (WM), maintenance and manipulation of a single elementary visual attribute, i.e., the orientation of a grating presented in central vision. This approach allowed us to equate difficulty across tasks and prevented subjects from using verbal strategies or vestibular cues. Maintenance of orientations involved a distributed fronto-parietal network, that is, left and right lateral superior frontal sulcus (SFSl), bilateral ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), bilateral precuneus, and right superior parietal lobe (SPL). A more medial superior frontal sulcus region (SFSm) was identified as being instrumental in the manipulative operation of updating orientations retained in the WM. Functional connectivity analysis revealed that orientation WM relies on a coordinated interaction between frontal and parietal regions. In general, the current findings confirm the distinction between maintenance and manipulative processes, highlight the functional heterogeneity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), and suggest a more dynamic view of WM as a process requiring the coordinated interaction of anatomically distinct brain areas. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1162/08989290152541476 (AN 5324053)

    Verbal Working Memory Load Affects Regional Brain Activation as Measured by PET. By: Jonides, John. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Jul97, Vol. 9 Issue 4, p462, 14p, 4 charts, 1 diagram, 5 graphs, 1bw Abstract: We report an experiment that assesses the effect of variations in memory load on brain activations that mediate verbal working memory. The paradigm that forms the basis of this experiment is the “n-back” task in which subjects must decide for each letter in a series whether it matches the one presented n items back in the series. This task is of interest because it recruits processes involved in both the storage and manipulation of information in working memory. Variations in task difficulty were accomplished by varying the value of n. As n increased, subjects showed poorer behavioral performance as well as monotonically increasing magnitudes of brain activation in a large number of sites that together have been identified with verbal working-memory processes. By contrast, there was no reliable increase in activation in sites that are unrelated to working memory. These results validate the use of parametric manipulation of task variables in neuroimaging research, and they converge with the subtraction paradigm used most often in neuroimaging. In addition, the data support a model of working memory that includes both storage and executive processes that recruit a network of brain areas, all of which are involved in task performance. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 6826810)

    Vedi un po' se ti possono essere utili

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    caspita..quante!!grazie guglielmo..gli do subito un okkiata

  7. #7
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di antone86
    Data registrazione
    28-05-2006
    Residenza
    Napoli
    Messaggi
    186
    ciao ragazzi,non so se è il posto giusto ma vorrei chiedervi un'informazione,io sto scrivendo la tesi su i disturbi emozionali dei celebrolesi,quelcuno puo darmi delle informazioni in merito,sa consigliarmi qualche link o articoli da consultare?....grazie

  8. #8
    Postatore Compulsivo L'avatar di Calethiel
    Data registrazione
    19-04-2005
    Residenza
    Roma provincia
    Messaggi
    3,590
    cosa intendi con disturbi emozionali? Conseguenti alla lesione traumatica o come vissuto psicologico? Non so se mi sono spiegata...

    Mentre il saggio indica la luna, lo stolto guarda il dito

    Non ti curar di loro, ma guarda oltre e passa

  9. #9
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di antone86
    Data registrazione
    28-05-2006
    Residenza
    Napoli
    Messaggi
    186
    Citazione Originalmente inviato da Calethiel Visualizza messaggio
    cosa intendi con disturbi emozionali? Conseguenti alla lesione traumatica o come vissuto psicologico? Non so se mi sono spiegata...
    intendo soggetti che dopo una lesione celebrale hanno dei disturbi emozionali,tipo la sindrome del sosia e cose del genere ma per adesso è ancora molto generica,per questo ho chiesto consigli sul materiale così da centrare meglio il campo

  10. #10
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281
    Diagnosis and treatment of depression following acquired brain injury: a comparison of practice in the UK and the Netherlands. By: Knottnerus, Anne Margreet; Turner-Stokes, Tabitha; van de Weg, F. B.; Heijnen, L.; Lankhorst, G. J.; Turner-Stokes, Lynne. Clinical Rehabilitation, Sep2007, Vol. 21 Issue 9, p805-811, 7p, 2 charts, 1 diagram Abstract: Objective: To describe and compare current practice in diagnosis and treatment of depression following acquired brain injury in two countries (UK and the Netherlands) which have different sets of guidelines. Setting and design: A cross-sectional survey of reported practice among rehabilitation physician members of the British and Dutch specialist societies. Methods: A 12-item postal questionnaire was sent to 496 rehabilitation physicians with two reminders: N=353 (71%) responded, 146 of whom did not manage people with acquired brain injury, leaving 207 questionnaires for analysis (Netherlands N=121, UK N=86). Descriptive summary statistics were compiled. Categorical and dichotomous data were compared between the groups using chi-squared tests. Results: Sixty-seven (78%) of British respondents served a predominantly younger adult (65 years) population, compared with only 27 (22%) of the Dutch, who mainly treated patients of all ages. In line with their respective guidelines, more British respondents reported that they screened all acquired brain injury patients for depression (68/86 (79%) British versus 71/121 (59%) Dutch, P < 0.01), and used formal measures (37/68 (54%) versus 14/69 (20%), P < 0.001). They also took a more active role in treatment of depression: only 1 (1%) never used antidepressants, compared with 22 (18%) of Dutch respondents (P < 0.001). On the other hand, where antidepressants were prescribed, the Dutch respondents were more likely than the British to follow-up their patients (93/98 (95%) versus 67/84 (80%), P < 0.01). Conclusions: The survey demonstrates a broadly similar approach, but highlights some significant variance in practice between the two countries which may stem from differences in population and service provision as well as their respective guidelines. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 26560363)

    Self-assessment of Impairment, Impaired Self-awareness, and Depression After Traumatic Brain Injury. By: Malec, James F.; Testa, Julie A.; Rush, Beth K.; Brown, Allen W.; Moessner, Anne M.. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, May/Jun2007, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p156-166, 11p Abstract: Objective: To identify patient features associated with early and late depression after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants: 3 clinical trauma groups (mild TBI, moderate-severe TBI, orthopedic injury) and their significant others. Measures: Preinjury: age, education, substance abuse, and psychiatric history; Injury severity: classification using Glasgow Coma Scale and cranial CT scan, posttraumatic amnesia; Early impairment: Neurobehavioral Functioning Inventory (NFI), Impaired Self-Awareness (ISA); Social and family support: Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Family Assessment Device; Depression: NFI Depression Scale. Method: Regression analyses of predictor variables on early and late measures of depression. Results: Depression rates did not differ among the 3 trauma groups. Preinjury level of education, previous psychiatric history, and perceived level of social support explained a small portion of the variance in depressive symptoms. Patients' self-assessment of their impairment at discharge was most strongly correlated with both early and late depression. ISA was associated with reduced self-report of depressive symptoms. However, when those with ISA were excluded from the analysis, self-assessment of impairment remained strongly associated with depression. Conclusions: Patients' self-assessment of impairment is strongly associated with early and late depression. Presence and severity of TBI does not appear to play a direct role in depression but does appear related to ISA, which serves as a barrier to the development of depression. Focusing on impairment appears to be a cardinal feature of depression in both patients with TBI and an orthopedic trauma group. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 25245544)

    Agitation in Acquired Brain Injury: Impact on Acute Rehabilitation Therapies. By: Lequerica, Anthony H.; Rapport, Lisa J.; Loeher, Kristen; Axelrod, Bradley N.; Vangel Jr., Stephen J.; Hanks, Robin A.. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, May/Jun2007, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p177-183, 7p Abstract: Objective: To examine the nature of agitation in patients with brain injury and quantify the relation between agitation and patient progress in rehabilitation. Design: Cross-sectional, correlational. Setting: Urban, inpatient rehabilitation facility in the midwestern United States. Participants: Sixty-nine patients with acquired brain injury admitted to an acute rehabilitation hospital. Main Outcome Measures: Therapy Engagement using the Rehabilitation Therapy Engagement Scale; Functional Status using the Functional Independence Measure. Results: Agitated behavior was inversely associated with engagement in rehabilitation therapy even after controlling for injury severity. Engagement in therapy mediated the relation between agitated behavior and progress in rehabilitation as assessed using a Functional Independence Measure efficiency ratio. Conclusions: Progress in acute brain injury rehabilitation appears to be meaningfully influenced by the complex interplay among injury severity, agitation, and engagement. The findings are consistent with a theoretical model, suggesting that agitated patients make less progress in rehabilitation not only because of greater injury severity but also because agitation disrupts engagement in rehabilitation therapies. Multiple clinical purposes may be better served by measuring behavioral excess on a continuum than in a dichotomous fashion. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 25245546)

    Psychological adjustment and marital satisfaction following head injury. Which critical personal characteristics should both partners develop? By: Blais, Marie Claude; Boisvert, Jean-Marie. Brain Injury, Apr2007, Vol. 21 Issue 4, p357-372, 16p Abstract: Primary objective and research design: Using a correlational design, this study verifies the relationships between personal characteristics of individuals with TBI and their spouses and their level of psychological and marital adjustment. Methods and procedure: Seventy individuals with TBI and their spouses in the post-acute rehabilitation phase completed self-report questionnaires assessing the predictive variables (coping and social problem-solving strategies; perceived communication skills) and the criteria variables of psychological and marital adjustment. Main outcomes and results: In the target group, the characteristics most strongly related to adjustment variables were an effective attitude towards problems, infrequent use of avoidance coping strategies, and a positive perception of one's spouse's communication skills. Individuals with TBI and their spouses report significantly lower scores on some of these personal characteristics, compared to those of a matched control group of 70 couples from the general population. Conclusions: Specific personal characteristics are critical for psychological and marital adjustment following TBI. This knowledge may be of relevance for detecting couples at risk for developing difficulties in the post-acute rehabilitation phase. Rehabilitation interventions targeting the personal characteristics identified as critical for the adjustment process could help to prevent these difficulties. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/02699050701311075 (AN 25049045)

    The ineffectiveness of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for diagnosis in an Omani traumatic brain injured population. By: Al-Adawi, Samir; Dorvlo, Atsu S. S.; Al-Naamani, Aziz; Glenn, Mel B.; Karamouz, Nasser; Chae, Heechin; Zaidan, Ziad A. J.; Burke, David T.. Brain Injury, Apr2007, Vol. 21 Issue 4, p385-393, 9p Abstract: Background: The rehabilitation of the traumatic brain injury (TBI) patient is especially challenging in non-western populations as the phenotypic indicators as well as the neurobehavioral assessments for the survivors of brain injury are limited. Objective: The study screened for the prevalence of anxiety and depressive states among patients with TBI and examined the validity of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to identify TBI patients with comorbid affective dysfunctions, specifically anxiety and depressive disorders, in an Omani population. Methods: Sixty-eight survivors of TBI were screened with the semi-structured, Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) and the HADS. A receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was calculated to discriminate the power of the HADS for every possible threshold score. Results: The semi-structured interview revealed the prevalence rate of 57.4% for depressive disorder and 50% for anxiety disorder. The sensitivity (53.8%) and specificity 75.9%, gave the best compromise using the cut-off score of 4, suggesting HADS is not a useful screening tool for this particular population. Conclusions: Phenotypic indicators as detected by CIDI revealed that prevalence of affective dysfunctionality is common among this TBI population. Although the HADS is the most widely used screening instrument in other clinical populations, it does not appear to be a reliable resource in identifying depression and anxiety in people with traumatic brain injury in Oman. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/02699050701311059 (AN 25049043)

    Loss of Emotional Experience After Traumatic Brain Injury: Findings With the Startle Probe Procedure. Saunders, Jennifer Clare; McDonald, Skye; Richardson, Rick; Neuropsychology, Vol 20(2), Mar 2006. pp. 224-231. [Journal Article] Abstract: The authors used affective modulation of the eyeblink startle response to examine the impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on emotional reactions to pictures. Participants were 13 individuals with severe TBI and 24 controls. Participants were presented with pictures that differed in affective valence (e.g., mutilated bodies, erotic couples, and household objects) while the eyeblink startle response to an acoustic probe was measured. Startle amplitude was used to assess valence of emotional response, and startle latency was used to index interest in the pictures. Subjective ratings of the affect and arousal elicited by the various pictures were also obtained. TBI impaired startle potentiation to unpleasant pictures but not startle attenuation to pleasant pictures. Further, subjective ratings indicated that TBI participants found unpleasant pictures less arousing than did controls. The results are consistent with recent evidence of differential impairment in negative versus positive emotions after TBI and are discussed in relation to 2 competing explanations of startle modulation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Recognition of emotion from facial expression following traumatic brain injury. By: Croker, V.; McDonald, S.. Brain Injury, Sep2005, Vol. 19 Issue 10, p787-799, 13p Abstract: Primary Objective : To assess three domains of emotion recognition in people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Research design : A between group comparison. Procedures : Twenty-four participants with severe TBI and 15 matched participants without brain damage were asked to label and match facial expressions with and without context. The participants with TBI were also interviewed regarding changes in subjective experience of emotion. Main outcomes and results : Participants with TBI were found to be significantly impaired on expression labelling and matching, but experienced some improvement when provided with context. Negative emotions were particularly affected. Affective semantic knowledge and face perception appeared to be relatively intact in this group. The majority of participants with TBI reported some change in the post-injury experience of everyday emotion, although the pattern of changes differed greatly between individuals. Reduced subjective experience, especially of sadness and fear, was associated with poor emotion matching but not emotion labelling. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/02699050500110033 (AN 17588945)

    Broken hearts and mending bodies: the impact of trauma on intimacy. By: Mills, Bo; Turnbull, Gordon. Sexual & Relationship Therapy, Aug2004, Vol. 19 Issue 3, p265-289, 25p Abstract: Links have already been forged between sexualized trauma and difficulties with intimacy in clinical practice. This article seeks to examine those links more closely by exploring both the psychological and biological impact of traumatic life events on intrapsychic and interpersonal intimacy. In addition, the progression of grief within couple relationships, the impact of brain injury and the adverse effects that residual disabilities can cause with intimacy are examined in detail. Two case samples highlight the real difficulties experienced in sharing emotions and the need for prior acknowledgement of the impact of trauma before attempts to reassure are made. Finally, this article aspires to increase the insight of couple therapists who tackle the problems created by the impact of trauma by introducing them to new developments in the assessment and treatment of traumatic stress injuries. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/14681990410001715418 (AN 14010864)

    Organic Alexithymia: Issues in selective emotional blindness after organic cerebral damage. By: Becerra, R.. Australian Journal of Psychology, Aug2003 Supplement, Vol. 55, p166-166, 1/5p Abstract: Difficulty in describing emotions as a result of an acquired brain injury (ABI) is historically attributed to post-concussional confusion or psychosocial consequences of the accident. Perhaps the favoured explanation is to associate this difficulty with depression—a common reaction to adverse occurrences. However, it is possible that cerebral lesions damage anatomical substrates presumably regulating awareness of emotions and/or the traumatic experience that usually surrounds the incident selectively affect emotional awareness. Inspection of the non-ABI literature reveals the existence of a syndrome, named alexithymia, which could (partly) explain this phenomenon. The core of the syndrome is the inability to describe emotions. Propositions dealing with the aetiology of this syndrome seem to incorporate the notion of developmental and learnt factors. The presence of alexithymia in individuals who were not premorbidly seen as alexithymics suggests that there is a variant of the syndrome, which I have chosen to call 'Organic Alexithymia'. The present paper describes (a) the syndrome alexithymia, including its phenomenology, assessment and etiological explanations, (b) a case of organic alexithymia in light of the established condition, (c) current research in elucidating this acquired rather than developed phenomenon, and (d) posits some challenging research questions related to implicit/explicit cognitive/ emotional processes. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 11893403)

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  11. #11
    Postatore Compulsivo L'avatar di Calethiel
    Data registrazione
    19-04-2005
    Residenza
    Roma provincia
    Messaggi
    3,590
    TE l'ho chiesto perchè la mia tesi era sui disturbi psichici insorti dopo lesione cerebrale (e come loro conseguenza). Ma il campione era piccolo e più che altro si trovava ansia e depressione....niente sindromi rare...ma appunto era un campione piccolo...Spero tu sarai più fortunata!

    Se trovo altri articoli, oltre a quelli di willy te li posto!

    Mentre il saggio indica la luna, lo stolto guarda il dito

    Non ti curar di loro, ma guarda oltre e passa

  12. #12
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di antone86
    Data registrazione
    28-05-2006
    Residenza
    Napoli
    Messaggi
    186
    grazi ragazzi


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