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Discussione: Allucinazioni uditive

  1. #1
    Partecipante Affezionato L'avatar di Psykka85
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    Allucinazioni uditive

    Buongiorno a tutti,
    mi chiamo Jessica Dagani e sono una laureanda di psicologia. La mia tesi riguarda le allucinazioni uditive, non intese come sintomo psichiatrico ma come esperienza di vita. Sto conducendo una ricerca sulla fenomenologia delle voci, raccogliendo le esperienze della gente che vive in prima persona questi fenomeni. Lo scopo è in primis quello di "dare voce alle voci", permettendo quindi alle persone di affrontare queste esperienze parlandone con qualcuno che è lì per ascoltare e non per giudicare (ovviamente è garantito l’anonimato). Se qualcuno è disposto a partecipare alla nostra ricerca mi può contattare via mail: jeka2@libero.it Grazie mille.
    ...c'è sempre un "perchè" che sfugge...

    Venite a trovarmi!-------->http://www.myspace.com/angeljey

  2. #2
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
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    Qui: libri . leggere di antipsichiatria . sentire le voci puoi scaricare un libro (gratis) che affronta la questione del sentire voci dal punto di vista che hai scelto.

    In Olanda esiste un Movimento di chi sente le voci, coordinato dallo psichiatra Werk van Romme. Questo: Hearing Voices - Stemmen horen accepteren en begrijpelijk maken il sito (ma buona parte è in olandese...)

    In italiano, Franco Fasolo ha scritto qualcosa sul sentire voci da un punto di vista fenomenologico-esistenziale. Ma non ho sottomano i titoli, adesso.

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  3. #3
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
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    Articoli (in inglese) che ti potrebbero essere utili:

    Add AddedHUNGRY RESEARCHERS: THE TENSIONS AND DILEMMAS OF DEVELOPING AN EMANCIPATORY RESEARCH PROJECT WITH MEMBERS OF A HEARING VOICES GROUP. By: Snelling, Emma. Journal of Social Work Practice, Jul2005, Vol. 19 Issue 2, p131-147, 17p Abstract: This paper follows my experience of developing an emancipatory research project with members of a Hearing Voices Group (HVG) while working simultaneously as both a group facilitator and a researcher. I hope to highlight both the potential of this type of researching as well as some of the tensions and dilemmas. Working with group members whose voices had often been subjugated meant that this power imbalance and ways of addressing it were integral to the research project. Informed by critical psychological and social constructionist perspectives I wanted to undertake a project which would directly benefit the individual participants as well as provide a wider social relevance. I will argue that both the theoretical and methodological perspectives the researcher draws on in order to do this will have a profound impact on the emancipatory potential of the research for both the researcher and researched, especially by determining what stories it is possible to tell. I would like to reflect on the experience of undertaking this research drawing on an interview in which I used the Biographical Narrative Interpretive Method to highlight its potential and limitations for facilitating this type of research. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/02650530500144584 (AN 17535382)

    The distress experienced by voice hearers is associated with the perceived relationship between the voice hearer and the voice. By: Vaughan, Sam; Fowler, David. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, Jun2004, Vol. 43 Issue 2, p143-153, 11p, 2 charts Abstract: Objectives. To explore the relationship between distress and the perceptions that voice hearers have of their relationship with the voice they hear. We predicted that a dominant style of relating by the voice and a submissive and distancing style of relating by the voice hearer would be linked with distress. Method. Thirty people who were hearing voices took part in the study. Information was gathered about the characteristics of the voice-hearing experience, the level of distress experienced in relation to the voice, the relationship between the voice hearer and the voice, and level of depression. Results. The tendency for the voice to relate in a dominating, insulting manner and the tendency of individuals to react with suspicion and lack of communication with the voice were uniquely associated with distress. Conclusions. Appraisals of the relationship between the voice and voice hearer made by voice hearers are associated with differing emotional responses to voices. Clinical assessments of people who have distressing voices may be enhanced by a detailed consideration of the sort of relationship that exists between the client and their voice. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 13706477)

    Add AddedVoices in the brain. By: Spence, Sean A.. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, Feb/May2004, Vol. 9 Issue 1/2, p1-8, 8p Abstract: This special issue of Cognitive Neuropsychiatry is devoted to the problem of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH5): the experience of "hearing voices". Here, the word "problem" might imply a symptom and/or an intellectual puzzle. Throughout human history AVHs have been variously construed, sometimes as a sign of divine inspiration, sometimes as a symptom of mental illness (Leudar & Thomas, 2000). In this issue we sample some contemporary accounts of this strange aspect of human experience. Such a concentration of material, devoted to this single topic, is, we think, unusual and provides a unique opportunity for weighing up alternative strands of data and debate. The committed investigator, and the interested reader, should, we hope, find much that is stimulating and provocative. In the final analysis, we are attempting to under- stand a phenomenon that may be said to have profound effects upon many people's lives: Whether they hear voices themselves or care for (and about) those who hear them. Let us begin with a brief case study. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/13546800344000110 (AN 12021290)

    Choices for voices: A voice hearer's perspective on hearing voices. By: Cockshutt, Graham. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, Feb/May2004, Vol. 9 Issue 1/2, p9-11, 3p; Abstract: The article describes the hearer's perspective on "hearing voices." The voice hearers feel that they become aware of what is happening to them and results in developing a variety of coping strategies, called as distraction techniques voices appears to be externalised and real, but they are false manifestation of internal thoughts of the voice hearers. Coping strategies includes that voice hearers should accept that they hear voices and that they might go through periods of being unwell. Second strategy is that they should take medication. Listening to the music, relaxation techniques, coping with stress, forward planning are the other coping strategies used by the voice hearers. The voice hearers need the help of the doctors to explain them about the "hearing voices." DOI: 10.1080/13546800344000129 (AN 12021288)

    Hearing voices: A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. By: Thomas, Philip; Bracken, Patrick; Leudar, Ivan. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, Feb/May2004, Vol. 9 Issue 1/2, p13-23, 11p Abstract: The word "phenomenology" has a number of meanings. In this paper we briefly contrast the different meanings of the word in psychiatry and philosophy. We then consider the work of the philosophers Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty, as examples of what Hubert Dreyfus calls ontological phenomenology, in contrast to an epistemological approach. We present a brief outline of Merleau-Ponty's theory of embodiment, and contrast this with the dominant, epistemological (or Cartesian) view of experience. Through the example of a woman who experienced bereavement hallucinations, we try to show how this approach can open up a hermeneutic approach to the experience of hearing voices. An understanding of embodiment can help to counter reductionism, whether biological or social, and dualism (body/mind and mind/society). It is only when we consider the totality of human experience that we can understand its meaning. This has two main benefits. First, it legitimates the claims made by those who hear voices that their experiences are intrinsically meaningful. Second, it can provide a framework for those who work with voice hearers and who are interested in understanding these experiences. In this sense, phenomenology can become a valuable clinical tool. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/13546800344000138 (AN 12021292)

    A Q-methodological study of hearing voices: A preliminary exploration of voice hearers' understanding of their experiences. By: Jones, S.; Guy, A.; Ormrod, J. A.. Psychology & Psychotherapy: Theory, Research & Practice, Jun2003, Vol. 76 Issue 2, p189, 21p Abstract: Using Q-methodology and structured interviews, this preliminary study set out to explore how a diverse range of voice hearers construed their experience of hearing voices. Following factor analysis of 20 completed Q-sorts, six factors emerged. Pejorative media stereotypes about voice hearers were rejected, and despite the dominance of the biomedical model in our culture, on no factor did participants adhere to all of the biomedical concepts. All six factors endorsed some elements of psychological discourse on voice-hearing experiences. It is argued that attempting to understand voice hearers within a single theoretical framework may limit or adversely affect engagement and understanding of an individual. Consistent with previous research, users of mental-health services were more likely to find voices frightening and perceive them as negative experiences than non-users. However, some non-users found managing some of their voices difficult despite having seemingly positive beliefs about the experience of hearing voices. Comment is made on the potential therapeutic implications of this study along with some acknowledgement of its limitations. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 10141500)

    Add AddedHearing voices: A common human experience. By: Watkins, J.; Romme, M.; Escher, S.. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, Mar2003, Vol. 57 Issue 2, p157, 3p; Abstract: Reviews the books 'Hearing Voices: A Common Human Experience,' by J. Watkins and 'Making Sense of Voices: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals Working With Voice-Hearers,' by M. Romme and S. Escher. (AN 9755766)

    Coping defence and depression in adolescents hearing voices. By: ESCHER, SANDRA; DELESPAUL, PHILIPPE; ROMME, MARIUS; BUIKS, ALEX; VAN OS, JIM. Journal of Mental Health, Feb2003, Vol. 12 Issue 1, p91, 9p Abstract: Background: The level of self-initiated coping defences in the face of auditory hallucinations reflects the degree to which the psychotic experiences are exceeding the person's resources. As it has been suggested that individuals who feel overwhelmed by their psychotic experiences are also more likely to develop depression, greater levels of self-initiated coping defences should predict onset of depression in the context of auditory hallucinations. Method: Eighty adolescents (mean age 12.9 years, SD = 3.1) who reported hearing voices were examined at baseline and followed-up three times over a period of 3 years. Fifty per cent were receiving professional care, but 50% were not in need of care. Baseline measurement of self-initiated coping defences and psychopathology were used as predictors of depression at follow-up. Results: Baseline level of self-initiated coping was strongly associated with baseline severity of positive psychotic symptoms. Coping at baseline, with the exception of active problem solving, predicted an increase in the level of depression over the follow-up period (OR = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.4, 6.4), independent of baseline psychopathology, demographic characteristics, receipt of professional care and appraisals and attributions related to the voices. Conclusions: The results suggest that individuals who have a tendency to feel overwhelmed by the experience of voices, as evidenced by a more defensive style of response, are more likely to develop depression. Declaration of interest: Funded by the Dutch Prevention Fund. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN 9303691)

    CAN YOU HEAR ME THINKING? By: Bellamy, James D.. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, Summer2000, Vol. 24 Issue 1, p73, 3p; Abstract: Presents a patient's account of his psychological illness. Symptoms developed for months; Crises encountered during last three years at school; Experiences in hearing voices and visual hallucinations; Realization and acceptance of his condition. (AN 3532873)

    Verbal hallucinations or hearing voices: What does the experience signify? By: Thomas, Philip; Leudar, Ba. Journal of Mental Health, Jul96, Vol. 5 Issue 3, p215, 4p; Abstract: Focuses on verbal hallucinations. Diagnosis; Conditions; Association between verbal hallucinations and abuse; Restrictions on the ability to describe verbal hallucinations. (AN 9608224792)

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  4. #4
    Partecipante Affezionato L'avatar di Psykka85
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    Grazie mille per le info, Willy!
    ...c'è sempre un "perchè" che sfugge...

    Venite a trovarmi!-------->http://www.myspace.com/angeljey

  5. #5
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di Nethelien
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    Il prof. Salvini si occupa di questo argomento.
    Se vuoi ti posso prestare un libro con un capitolo dedicato all'argomento...

  6. #6
    Johnny
    Ospite non registrato
    Salvini, l'ho avuto come prof. di psico. clinica.
    Il capitolo di trova in "Psicologia clinica" edito dalla Upsel e si intitola "Le allucinazioni uditive non psicotiche", ma ci sono un paio di capitoli anche in "Diversità, devianza e terapie" dello stesso autore e editore.


    In sostanza Salvini vede il fenomeno secondo l'ottica costruttivista: "per il realista ipotetico (diversamente dal realista monista) la realtà non è altro che il frutto di una costruzione personale, reale nei suoi effetti: la realtà delle voci va quindi cercata nei sistemi di credenze , valori, significati (=sistema di riferimento, o matrice generativa) socialmente negoziati e collettivamente condivisi. CIò significa che attraverso un processo di reificazione gli uditori finiscono per subire quella stessa realtà che essi stessi producono".
    Ultima modifica di Johnny : 13-04-2008 alle ore 14.05.58

  7. #7
    Partecipante Affezionato L'avatar di Psykka85
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    grazie mille per le dritte!ho fatto la tesi triennale col professor Salvini e il prof.Turchi come relatore, quindi i loro testi li conosco..se conoscete qualcuno disposto a partecipare alla mia ricerca mettetelo in contatto con me!grazie ancora!
    ...c'è sempre un "perchè" che sfugge...

    Venite a trovarmi!-------->http://www.myspace.com/angeljey

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