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Visualizzazione risultati 1 fino 8 di 8
  1. #1
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di ragnetto82
    Data registrazione
    07-01-2008
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    Oristano (provincia)
    Messaggi
    162

    psicologia della salute

    cerco materiale per la mia tesi in psicologia sociale della salute, in particolare su tumori in generale, sui tumori femminili e sul pap-test. se qualcuno mi sa dare qualche indicazione per la bibliografia....Grazie!!!!!!!!!!!!

  2. #2
    Partecipante L'avatar di cicci 1986
    Data registrazione
    26-03-2008
    Messaggi
    37
    Ciao! anch'io sto preparando una tesi simile alla tua... o almeno, per ora cerco materiale, forse potresti provare a vedere se c'è qualcosa su medline, o sul sito del ministero della salute... se quello che ti interessa è l'approccio teorico cerca sui siti di psiconcologia o fai riferimento all' Approccio Psiconcologico Integrato.. vorrei esserti più utile ma può darsi che in corso d'opera troverò qualcosa di più specifico da consigliarti! se ne hai anche tu mi farebbe comodo.. due teste sono sempre meglio di una! in bocca al lupo!

  3. #3
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281
    A randomized trial of a representational intervention to decrease cancer pain (RIDCancerPain). Ward, Sandra; Donovan, Heidi; Gunnarsdottir, Sigridur; Health Psychology, Vol 27(1), Jan 2008. pp. 59-67. [Journal Article] Abstract: Objective: Based on theories regarding cognitive representations of illness and processes of conceptual change, a representational intervention to decrease cancer pain (RIDcancerPain) was developed and its efficacy tested. Design: A two-group RCT (RIDcancerPain versus control) with outcome and mediating variables assessed at baseline (T1) and 1 and 2 months later (T2 and T3). Subjects were 176 adults with pain related to metastatic cancer. Main Outcome Measures: Outcome variables were two pain severity measures (BPI and TPQM), pain interference with life, and overall quality of life. Mediating variables were attitudinal barriers to pain management and coping (medication use). Results: One hundred and fifty subjects completed the study. Subjects in RIDcancerPain (T1-T2 and T1-T3) showed greater decreases in Barrier scores than those in control. Subjects in RIDcancerPain (T1-T3) showed greater decreases in pain severity than those in control. Change in Barriers scores mediated the effect of RIDcancerPain on pain severity. Conclusion: RIDcancerPain was efficacious with respect to some outcomes. Further work is needed to strengthen it. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

    Predictors of perceived susceptibility of breast cancer and changes over time: A mixed modeling approach. McQueen, Amy; Swank, Paul R.; Bastian, Lori A.; Health Psychology, Vol 27(1), Jan 2008. pp. 68-77. [Journal Article] Abstract: Objective: To examine predictors of perceived susceptibility to breast cancer and assess differences across three dependent measures. Design: Annual surveys were completed by US women veterans (N = 3,758) participating in a repeat mammography intervention trial. Multivariable non-linear mixed model analyses examined individual- and group-level changes in perceived susceptibility to breast cancer. Dependent Measures: Three single-item measures of perceived susceptibility to breast cancer (percent risk, ordinal risk, and comparative risk likelihood). Predictors included demographic, health status, health behavior, affect, knowledge, and subjective norm variables. Results: Breast symptoms and greater cancer worry increased perceived susceptibility for all three measures. Other predictors varied by dependent measure. Random change, indicating individual variability, was observed for percent risk only. Conclusion: Despite small model effect sizes, breast symptoms and cancer worry were consistent predictors and may be good targets for messages designed to influence women's perceived susceptibility to breast cancer. Researchers may benefit from using measures of perceived susceptibility with larger response scales, but additional measurement research is needed. Combining indicators of perceived susceptibility may be undesirable when different predictors are associated with different measures. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

    Systematic review and meta-analysis of psychological and activity-based interventions for cancer-related fatigue. Jacobsen, Paul B.; Donovan, Kristine A.; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Health Psychology, Vol 26(6), Nov 2007. pp. 660-667. [Journal Article] Correction to: Correction to Jacobsen et al (2007) Abstract: [Correction Notice: An erratum for this article was reported in Vol 27(1) of Health Psychology (see record 2008-00647-018). The text directing readers to view supplementary materials online was omitted. That information is provided here: "Supplementary materials to this article may be viewed at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.26.6.660.supp."] Context: Fatigue is among the most common and distressing symptoms experienced by cancer patients. Objective: This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates the efficacy of psychological and activity-based interventions against cancer-related fatigue in cancer patients. Data Sources: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL. Study Selection: Randomized controlled trials of psychological and activity-based interventions involving adult cancer patients in which fatigue was an outcome were reviewed. Extraction: Forty-one trials were reviewed and 30 were included in a meta-analysis. Data Synthesis: Fifty percent of psychological trials and 44% of activity-based trials rated fair or better in quality yielded significant findings favoring the intervention condition. Meta-analysis yielded an overall effect size of 0.09 (95% CI = .02- .16) favoring nonpharmacological conditions. Further analysis indicated that effect sizes were significant for psychological interventions (d-sub(w) = .10, 95% CI = .02-.18) but not activity-based interventions (d-sub(w) = .05, 95% CI = -.08 - .19). Conclusions: Findings provide limited support for use of nonpharmacological interventions to manage cancer-related fatigue. The lack of research with heightened fatigue as an eligibility criterion is a notable weakness of the existing evidence base. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

    Social-cognitive processes as moderators of a couple-focused group intervention for women with early stage breast cancer. Manne, Sharon; Ostroff, Jamie S.; Winkel, Gary; Health Psychology, Vol 26(6), Nov 2007. pp. 735-744. [Journal Article] Abstract: Objective: The purpose was to examine whether social-cognitive variables would moderate the efficacy of a couple-focused group intervention (CG) for women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer. Design: Participants (N = 238) were randomly assigned to 6 sessions of a couple-focused group versus usual care. Intent to treat growth curve modeling analyses indicated that emotional expression and emotional processing moderated CG effects on depression. Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome measures for this study were psychological distress and psychological well-being. Results: Treatment attrition analyses separating out participants assigned to but not attending CG indicated that emotional expression, emotional processing, and protective buffering moderated the effects of CG among those who attended CG with the most consistent effects noted for emotional processing on indicators of distress and well-being. Conclusion: The CG intervention may be more effective for patients who begin the group experience using emotional approach coping strategies to deal with cancer. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Using message framing to promote acceptance of the human papillomavirus vaccine. Gerend, Mary A.; Shepherd, Janet E.; Health Psychology, Vol 26(6), Nov 2007. pp. 745-752. [Journal Article] Abstract: Objective: Use of message framing for encouraging vaccination, an increasingly common preventive health behavior, has received little empirical investigation. The authors examined the relative effectiveness of gain-versus loss-framed messages in promoting acceptance of a vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV)-a virus responsible for virtually all cases of cervical cancer. Design: Undergraduate women (N = 121) were randomly assigned to read a booklet describing the benefits of receiving (gain-framed message) or the costs of not receiving (loss-framed message) a prophylactic HPV vaccine. After reading the booklet, participants indicated their intent to obtain the HPV vaccine. Main Outcome Measure: A 5-item composite representing intentions to obtain the HPV vaccine. Results: The effect of message framing on HPV vaccine acceptance was moderated by risky sexual behavior and approach avoidance motivation. A loss-framed message led to greater HPV vaccination intentions than a gain framed message but only among participants who had multiple sexual partners and participants who infrequently used condoms. The loss-frame advantage was also observed among participants high in avoidance motivation. Conclusion: Findings highlight characteristics of the message recipient that may affect the success of framed messages promoting vaccine acceptance. This study has practical implications for the development of health communications promoting vaccination. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Meaning in life mediates the relationship between social and physical functioning and distress in cancer survivors. By: Jim, Heather S.; Andersen, Barbara L.. British Journal of Health Psychology, Sep2007, Vol. 12 Issue 3, p363-381, 19p, 2 charts, 2 diagrams Abstract: Objectives. Impairments in physical and social functioning are often associated with distress for the cancer survivor. Impaired functioning may also lead individuals to question previously held beliefs about meaning in life. Meaning in life was hypothesized to mediate the relationship between functioning and distress. Design and methods. Two studies were conducted. In the cross-sectional study (I), cancer survivors (N = 420) were accrued via the Internet and completed measures of social and physical functioning, meaning and distress. In the longitudinal study (II), breast cancer survivors (N = 167) completed measures of functioning at 18 months, meaning at 24 months and distress at 30 months post-diagnosis. Results. In Study I, meaning in life was a significant, partial mediator for both of the effects of physical and social functioning impairments on heightened distress. In Study II, significant indirect effects of functioning impairments on distress through meaning were replicated even when functioning and distress were measured 1 year apart. The relationship of social functioning and distress was fully mediated by meaning in life, whereas the relationship of physical functioning and distress was partially mediated by meaning. Conclusions. The negative social and physical sequelae of cancer are associated with heightened distress, and this association appears to be accounted for, in part, by patients' loss of meaning in their lives. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1348/135910706X128278 (AN 26281924)

    Add AddedPassive coping and psychological distress in women adhering to regular breast cancer surveillance. By: Pieterse, K.; van Dooren, S.; Seynaeve, C.; Bartels, C. C. M.; Rijnsburger, A. J.; de Koning, H. J.; Klijn, J. G. M.; van Elderen, T.; Tibben, A.; Duivenvoorden, H. J.. Psycho-Oncology, Sep2007, Vol. 16 Issue 9, p851-858, 8p, 2 charts, 1 diagram, 1 graph Abstract: Since 2000 the MRISC study evaluates the psychological consequences of regular breast cancer surveillance for women at increased risk for hereditary breast cancer. Coping style may influence these psychological consequences. In a cohort of 357 women at increased risk for hereditary breast cancer, the impact of coping styles on the course, divided into level and trend of psychological distress (general and breast cancer specific) was examined, around two consecutive surveillance appointments. With structural equation modelling we found passive coping to be associated with higher levels of both general and breast cancer specific distress. Seeking social support, expression of emotions and thinking comforting thoughts were associated with lower levels of psychological distress. Coping style was not associated with the trend of psychological distress around the two surveillance appointments. It is recommendable to take coping styles into account when counselling these high-risk women. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/pon.1135 (AN 26368972)


    Protective buffering and emotional desynchrony among spousal caregivers of cancer patients. Langer, Shelby L.; Rudd, Michael E.; Syrjala, Karen L.; Health Psychology, Vol 26(5), Sep 2007. pp. 635-643. [Journal Article] Abstract: Objective: To examine protective buffering and emotional desynchrony among spousal caregivers of cancer survivors. Design: Repeated measures; 42 caregivers engaged in 2 videotaped, oral emotional expression exercises: 1 in the presence of their patient and 1 in the absence of their patient. Main Outcome Measures: Felt emotion (self-report) and expressed emotion (lexical expression or words uttered and coder-derived facial expression). Other measures assessed mental and physical health, dyadic satisfaction, and dispositional emotional inhibition. Results: Protective buffering differed by communicative channel (lexical vs. facial). Caregivers' facial expressions were more positive when the patient was present versus absent. In contrast, the valence of caregivers' words did not differ per patient presence. Facial protective buffering was unrelated to health and dyadic outcomes. Lexical protective buffering was inversely related to both caregiver and patient marital satisfaction. Dispositional emotional inhibition was inversely related to caregiver mental health and marital satisfaction. Desynchrony occurred when the patient was present but was counter to prediction; felt emotion was more positive than expressed emotion. Conclusion: Results provide behavioral evidence of facial protective buffering. To the extent that lexical buffering occurs, it poses a dyadic risk, and chronic inhibition poses both psychological and dyadic risks. Future research is needed to refine the operational definition of desynchrony and to examine the biopsychosocial sequelae of buffering. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Utility of a cognitive-behavioral model to predict fatigue following breast cancer treatment. Donovan, Kristine A.; Small, Brent J.; Andrykowski, Michael A.; Health Psychology, Vol 26(4), Jul 2007. pp. 464-472. [Journal Article] Abstract: The objective of the current study was twofold: (a) to determine whether subgroups of breast cancer patients could be identified on the basis of their distinct trajectory or pattern of fatigue following treatment for early stage cancer using growth mixture modeling and (b) to examine whether the subgroups could be distinguished on the basis of a cognitive-behavioral model. Growth mixture modeling and a prospective longitudinal design were used to examine the course of fatigue after treatment for early stage breast cancer. Women (n = 261; mean age = 55.2 years) provided fatigue ratings for 6 months following treatment. A low-fatigue group (n = 85) and a high-fatigue group (n = 176) were extracted. Women who were not married, had a lower income, had a higher body mass index, engaged in greater fatigue catastrophizing, and were lower in exercise participation were more likely to be in the high-fatigue group. Only body mass index and catastrophizing remained significant predictors in multivariate analysis. Findings suggest considerable heterogeneity in the experience of fatigue following treatment and support the utility of a cognitive-behavioral model in predicting the course of posttreatment fatigue. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

    Benefits of comprehensive health care for improving health outcomes in women. Jarrett, Erica M.; Yee, Barbara W. K.; Banks, Martha E.; Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, Vol 38(3), Jun 2007. pp. 305-313. [Journal Article] Abstract: The American Psychological Association Health Care for the Whole Person Task Force was formulated to provide a rationale for integrating behavioral health services in primary care. Collectively, the task force called for a transformation of the biomedical system into one based on the biopsychosocial model. This article is a summary of the Women's Health Committee position paper that reviewed contextual factors in women's health, provided recommendations for clinical service action, and recommended an integrated primary health care system to address women's health needs. This article provides a vision of integrated care and a practical guide for psychology practitioners as they collaborate with other health care providers and health policy groups to improve health outcomes for women over the life course. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)

    provate a darci un'occhiata

    Buona vita

    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  4. #4
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di ragnetto82
    Data registrazione
    07-01-2008
    Residenza
    Oristano (provincia)
    Messaggi
    162
    grazie mille a entrambi...darò un'occhiata a tutto....
    "e poi c'è la psicologia che da equilibrio ad ogni tua idea,
    e ti ripeti che sei forte, che dopotutto in fondo
    anche questa passerà....
    dai che domani uscirà il sole, anche se dentro
    piove...."

    Fabrizio Moro "Domani"

  5. #5
    Partecipante L'avatar di cicci 1986
    Data registrazione
    26-03-2008
    Messaggi
    37
    giusto per approffittare ancora un pochino dall'aiuto... io cerco articoli riguardo l'isterectomia concentrandomi sugli aspetti che deve affrontare il partner della paziente...se hai materiale a riguardo mi daresti una grossa mano.. grazie comunque!!

  6. #6
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di ragnetto82
    Data registrazione
    07-01-2008
    Residenza
    Oristano (provincia)
    Messaggi
    162
    Citazione Originalmente inviato da cicci 1986 Visualizza messaggio
    giusto per approffittare ancora un pochino dall'aiuto... io cerco articoli riguardo l'isterectomia concentrandomi sugli aspetti che deve affrontare il partner della paziente...se hai materiale a riguardo mi daresti una grossa mano.. grazie comunque!!
    mmm....per il momento non ho nulla di così specifico...ma se trovo qualcosa (anche perchè sto ancora consultando del materiale) ti faccio sapere sicuraente
    "e poi c'è la psicologia che da equilibrio ad ogni tua idea,
    e ti ripeti che sei forte, che dopotutto in fondo
    anche questa passerà....
    dai che domani uscirà il sole, anche se dentro
    piove...."

    Fabrizio Moro "Domani"

  7. #7
    Neofita
    Data registrazione
    12-03-2008
    Residenza
    Modena
    Messaggi
    7
    Ciao. Io sto scrivendo la tesi proprio su questo argomento. Ho circa cinque pagine di bibliografia, che posso volentieri inviarti. Ti consiglio inoltre di cercare sia su google che pubmed. Si trovano tantissime informazioni utili.
    Buon Lavoro.

  8. #8
    Partecipante L'avatar di cicci 1986
    Data registrazione
    26-03-2008
    Messaggi
    37
    ciao! grazie mille per l'aiuto!se ti fosse possibile inviare il tuo materiale anche a me, mi farebbe comodo...ovviamente appena troverò qualcosa di più sostanzioso e che ti potrebbe essere utile farò lo stesso..ancora grazie!

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