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Discussione: Tesi psiconcologia

  1. #1

    Tesi psiconcologia

    Ciao :-)
    Qualcuno ha da consigliarmi testi o articolo o qualsiasi forma di materiale per una tesi sulle cure palliative?

  2. #2
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: Tesi psiconcologia

    Se leggi il francese ci sono ottime riviste online:

    http://www.cairn.info/revue-infokara.htm

    http://www.soinspalliatifs.be/soinspalliatifsbe.html

    http://www.cecilefurstenberg.net/art...-96046823.html

    http://www.larevuedupraticien.fr/art...ins-palliatifs

    In italiano trovi buon materiale sul sito della SICP

    In Svizzera (ma in lingua italiana) trovi RIVISTA PALLIATIVE-CH

    Articoli in inglese te ne posso mandare parecchi. Mandami un PM con una mail a cui inviarli.

    Sul motore di ricerca nazionale OPAC (http://www.sbn.it/opacsbn/opaclib) inserisci CURE PALLIATIVE e ti escono tutti i libri italiani a disposizione di biblioteche pubbliche (università comprese) sull'argomento. Ti fai una lista, vai alla tua biblioteca e chiedi un prestito interbibliotecario (solitamente lo paghi, ma non molto).

    Buona vita
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  3. #3

    Riferimento: Tesi psiconcologia

    Grazie!!!! I siti in francesce che mi hai consigliato siceramente non li conoscevo!
    Per caso tra gli articoli in inglese di cui mi parlava hai qualcosa sulla percezione delle cure palliative sia da parte del paziente che dei familiari e degli operatori?

  4. #4
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: Tesi psiconcologia

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da Sorrisetta Visualizza messaggio
    Grazie!!!! I siti in francesce che mi hai consigliato siceramente non li conoscevo!
    Per caso tra gli articoli in inglese di cui mi parlava hai qualcosa sulla percezione delle cure palliative sia da parte del paziente che dei familiari e degli operatori?
    Vedi se ti possono essere utili questi:

    Illicit drug use as a challenge to the delivery of end-of-life care services to homeless persons: Perceptions of health and social services professionals.
    By: McNeil, Ryan; Guirguis-Younger, Manal. Palliative Medicine. Jun2012, Vol. 26 Issue 4, p350-359. 10p. Abstract: Homeless persons tend to die younger than the housed population and have complex, often unmet, end-of-life care needs. High levels of illicit drug use among this population are a particular challenge for health and social services professionals involved in end-of-life care services delivery. This article explores the challenges of end-of-life care services to homeless illicit drug users based on data collected during a national study on end-of-life care services delivery to homeless persons in Canada. The authors conducted qualitative interviews with 50 health and social services professionals involved in health services delivery to homeless persons in five cities. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Themes were organised into two domains. First, barriers preventing homeless illicit drug users from accessing end-of-life care services, such as competing priorities (e.g. withdrawal management), lack of trust in healthcare providers and discrimination. Second, challenges to end-of-life care services delivery to this population in health and social care settings, including non-disclosure of illicit drug use, pain and symptom management, interruptions in care, and lack of experience with addictions. The authors identify a need for increased research on the role of harm reduction in end-of-life care settings to address these challenges. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER] DOI: 10.1177/0269216311402713. (AN: 76331951)
    Argomenti: CANADA; HEALTH services accessibility; HEALTH status indicators; HOMELESS persons; INTERVIEWING; MEDICAL care; MEDICAL personnel; PALLIATIVE treatment; RESEARCH -- Finance; SELF-disclosure; SOCIAL services; SOCIAL workers; SOUND recordings; SUBSTANCE abuse; HARM reduction; THEMATIC analysis; DATA analysis -- Software
    The Preferred Priorities for Care document in Motor Neurone Disease: Views of bereaved relatives and carers.
    By: Preston, Harriet; Fineberg, Iris Cohen; Callagher, Pauline; Mitchell, Douglas J. Palliative Medicine. Mar2012, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p132-138. 7p. Abstract: Increasing emphasis is being placed on the need for advanced care planning (ACP) at the end of life. The Preferred Priorities for Care (PPC) document is a patient-held record promoted by the End of Life Care Strategy as an ACP tool to promote discussion and communication amongst patients, family and health care providers. However, little research exists into evaluating its effectiveness or exploring patient and carer views, particularly in non-malignant disease. Because the majority of patients with Motor Neurone Disease (MND) lose verbal communication, early discussion of patients’ wishes and preferences, a central aspect of ACP, is vital. This study examined MND patients’ bereaved relatives’ experiences of using the PPC document and their perceptions about its impact on end-of-life care using qualitative methods. Key findings adding to existing literature were that the PPC document was felt to have little impact on end-of-life care amongst this patient group and that there was a perceived lack of awareness of the document amongst health care professionals (HCPs), in particular hospital staff. This was felt to limit the effectiveness of the document. This has obvious implications for practice, looking at awareness amongst HCPs and ways to improve this situation, particularly in light of the current pressures to meet patient preferences at the end of life. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER] DOI: 10.1177/0269216311399664. (AN: 71837647)
    Argomenti: ENGLAND; FAMILIES -- Psychological aspects; COMMUNICATION; DOCUMENTATION; EXPERIENCE; INTERVIEWING; RESEARCH -- Methodology; MOTOR neurons -- Diseases; PALLIATIVE treatment; ADVANCE directives (Medical care); QUALITATIVE research; THEMATIC analysis; DIARY (Literary form)
    Pubblicazione accademica
    Unmet needs of severely affected multiple sclerosis patients: The health professionals’ view.
    By: Golla, Heidrun; Galushko, Maren; Pfaff, Holger; Voltz, Raymond. Palliative Medicine. Mar2012, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p139-151. 13p. 3 Diagrams, 4 Charts. Abstract: Background: Research has only started recently to specifically concentrate on the group of patients severely affected by multiple sclerosis (MS).Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the perception on patients’ unmet needs by healthcare professionals.Methods: Focus groups and expert interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis.Results: Unmet needs were identified in four main categories (‘support from family/friends’; ‘healthcare services’; ‘managing everyday life’; ‘maintaining biographical continuity’). Whereas physicians assessed most unmet needs in the category ‘healthcare services’, nurses and social workers focussed on unmet needs in the categories ‘support from family/friends’ and ‘maintaining biographical continuity’. Although the study focused on unmet needs of patients, professionals also voiced their unmet needs when caring for these patients. The group of professionals identified more subcategories than patients and included unmet needs of relatives.Conclusion: Adding professionals’ perspective to that of patients is essential to gain a holistic view on patients’ unmet needs and to further optimize their care. The perspective of palliative care might contribute to meet unmet needs of severely affected MS patients. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER] DOI: 10.1177/0269216311401465. (AN: 71837649)
    Argomenti: CONTENT analysis (Communication); FAMILIES; FOCUS groups; HEALTH services accessibility; INTERVIEWING; MEDICAL care -- Needs assessment; MULTIPLE sclerosis; NURSES; PALLIATIVE treatment; PHYSICIANS; QUESTIONNAIRES; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); SOCIAL workers; SOUND recordings; QUALITATIVE research; JUDGMENT sampling
    Database: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection
    Does Hospice Improve Quality of Care for Persons Dying from Dementia?
    By: Teno, Joan M.; Gozalo, Pedro L.; Lee, Ian C.; Kuo, Sylvia; Spence, Carol; Connor, Stephen R.; Casarett, David J. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Aug2011, Vol. 59 Issue 8, p1531-1536. 6p. 2 Charts. Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To examine the effectiveness of hospice services for persons dying from dementia from the perspective of bereaved family members. DESIGN: Mortality follow-back survey. SETTING: Death certificates were drawn from five states (AL, FL, TX, MA, and MN). PARTICIPANTS: Bereaved family members listed as the next of kin on death certificates when dementia was listed as the cause of death. MEASUREMENTS: Ratings of the quality of end-of-life care, perceptions of unmet needs, and opportunities to improve end-of-life care. Two questions were also asked about the peacefulness of dying and quality of dying. RESULTS: Of 538 respondents, 260 (48.3%) received hospice services. Family members of decedents who received hospice services reported fewer unmet needs and concerns with quality of care (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=0.49, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.33-0.74) and a higher rating of the quality of care (AOR=2.0, 95% CI=1.53-2.72). They also noted better quality of dying than those without hospice services. CONCLUSION: Bereaved family members of people with dementia who received hospice reported higher perceptions of the quality of care and quality of dying. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03505.x. (AN: 65005146)
    Argomenti: ALABAMA; FLORIDA; MASSACHUSETTS; MINNESOTA; TEXAS; ANALYSIS of variance; BEREAVEMENT; CONCEPTUAL structures (Information theory); CONFIDENCE intervals; DEMENTIA; DEMOGRAPHY; EPIDEMIOLOGY; FAMILIES; FAMILY medicine; HEALTH services accessibility; HOSPICE care; MEDICAL care -- Needs assessment; MEDICAL care -- Quality control; MULTIVARIATE analysis; NURSING care facilities; NURSING care facilities -- Employees; RESEARCH -- Finance; SAMPLING (Statistics); SCALE analysis (Psychology); STATISTICS; SURVEYS; LOGISTIC regression analysis; DEATH certificates; DATA analysis; SECONDARY analysis; MEDICAL records -- Research; PATIENT-centered care
    Database: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection
    Patients' psychosocial experiences of attending Specialist Palliative Day Care: A systematic review.
    By: Bradley, Sarah E; Frizelle, Dorothy; Johnson, Miriam. Palliative Medicine. 4/1/2011, Vol. 25 Issue 3, p210-228. 19p. 1 Diagram, 2 Charts. Abstract: Recent reviews conclude that the benefits of attending Specialist Palliative Day Care (SPDC) are likely to be in social, psychological and spiritual domains. However, these areas are not easily identified, leaving researchers and practitioners unclear as to what aspects of these domains patients most need and desire. The objective of this review was to systematically evaluate literature on patient-perceived psychosocial experiences of attendance at SPDC. Twelve studies were included. Evidence showed that patients value a person-centred approach that reduces isolation, increases social support, encourages communication and provides activities. Future research could focus on investigating why patients value the psychosocial experiences reported and how these experiences can be defined in a way that would be meaningful to clinical service commissioners. Once this has been done, clinicians can start to measure more effectively clinical effectiveness and devise justifiable interventions to help this patient group. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER] DOI: 10.1177/0269216310389222. (AN: 59955514)
    Argomenti: PALLIATIVE treatment -- Psychological aspects; COMMUNICATION; RESEARCH -- Methodology; MEDICAL care; MEDICINE -- Specialties & specialists; META-analysis; PALLIATIVE treatment; PATIENTS; PERCEPTION; PHYSICIANS; QUALITY assurance; SOCIAL isolation; DATA analysis; SOCIAL support; PATIENT selection
    Database: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection
    The outcomes of palliative care day services: A systematic review.
    By: Stevens, Elaine; Martin, Colin R; White, Craig A. Palliative Medicine. 3/1/2011, Vol. 25 Issue 2, p153-169. 17p. 1 Diagram, 2 Charts. Abstract: This systematic review evaluates the evidence underpinning the provision of palliative day care services (PDS) to determine whether such services have a measurable effect on attendees’ wellbeing. The majority of studies reviewed were qualitative and elicited individual perceptions of the benefits PDS. Although it was difficult to determine the quality of many studies, it would appear that attendance at PDS had a positive impact on attendees’ quality of life. Fewer studies utilized validated outcome measures to determine the effect of PDS on attendees’ wellbeing and small sample sizes combined with high attrition rates influenced the significance of some the results. However little quantitative evidence was offered to prove that PDS had an impact on attendees’ quality of life or wellbeing. The review concludes that dying people find attending PDS a valuable experience that allows them to engage with others and to be supported in a restorative environment. However, further well-powered empirical studies are required to provide quality evidence to determine whether or not attendance at PDS does indeed have a positive impact on the wellbeing of attendees. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER] DOI: 10.1177/0269216310381796. (AN: 59702348)
    Argomenti: AUDITING; HOSPICE care; MEDICAL care -- Evaluation; MEDICINE -- Societies, etc.; META-analysis; PALLIATIVE treatment
    Database: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection
    Living and coping with Parkinson's disease: Perceptions of informal carers.
    By: McLaughlin, Dorry; Hasson, Felicity; George Kernohan, W.; Waldron, Mary; McLaughlin, Marian; Cochrane, Barbara; Chambers, Helen. Palliative Medicine. 3/1/2011, Vol. 25 Issue 2, p177-182. 6p. Abstract: A review of the literature highlights the important role informal carers play in the provision of palliative care in the community. In order to explore the caring experience of relatives with Parkinson’s Disease (PD), interviews were conducted with 26 informal family caregivers. Interviews were taped, transcribed and subjected to content analysis. All caregivers were spouses, the majority female (n = 17) and all were responsible for providing physical, social and emotional care in the home. Although they viewed care giving as their role and duty, the results highlight the widespread burden of providing care on the emotional and physical health of the caregivers. The financial implications for providing care were outlined, with many reporting difficulty in accessing benefits. From the point of diagnosis, which had a huge emotional impact on relatives and carers, carers did not feel health professionals integrated them within the caring journey. Since diagnosis, carers commented on the lack of continued and coordinated care plans for relatives, resulting in symptoms being mismanaged and care opportunities for relatives and carers missed. Stereotypes of the meaning and timing of palliative care were common with many viewing it as being synonymous with cancer and not applicable to a person with PD. As the well-being of the informal carer directly influences the care of the person with PD, support interventions are required to relieve their burden, maximize outcomes and ensure targeting of services. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER] DOI: 10.1177/0269216310385604. (AN: 59702357)
    Argomenti: GREAT Britain; PARKINSON'S disease -- Diagnosis; PARKINSON'S disease -- Psychological aspects; ADJUSTMENT (Psychology); CAREGIVERS; ECONOMICS; MEDICAL care; MEDICAL care -- Needs assessment; PALLIATIVE treatment; QUALITATIVE research; SOCIAL support; BURDEN of care
    Database: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection
    Mandami in PM un indirizzo e mail valido e te ne invio quanti ne vuoi (in inglese e in formato pdf).

    Buona vita
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

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