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Discussione: Tesi in neuroeconomy

  1. #1
    L'avatar di Duccio
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    Tesi in neuroeconomy

    Ciao ragazzi, inizio diciamo ufficialmente a fare la mia tesi magistrale su questo argomento ponte diciamo fra le neuroscienze e la psicologia sociale diciamo intesa come processi di decision making.
    Di comune accordo con la mia relatrice imposteremo il discorso partendo da un primo capitolo di introduzione facendo un'excursus storico sulla disciplina dalle prime ricerche e intuizioni della psicologia sperimentale.. da kahneman .. teoria dei giochi ecc fino alle piu' recenti implicazioni sperimentali sulla neurobiologia..
    Poi due capitolo (o uno a seconda di quante cose trovo) sugli esperimenti piu' recenti su modelli animali e sull'uomo relative alle tecniche di neuroimmaging e un capitolo finale sulle conclusioni e eventuali e possibili applicazioni e scenari futuri.
    C'e' qualcuno che sta facendo la tesi su questo argomento? avete materiale articoli e quant'altro da indicarmi o inviarmi?

  2. #2
    L'avatar di Duccio
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    Riferimento: Tesi in neuroeconomy

    Nessuno sa darmi qualche consiglio su autori, ricerche o testi maggiormente rilevanti?

  3. #3
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
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    Riferimento: Tesi in neuroeconomy

    Vedi se c'è qualcosa che ti può essere utile, poi mandami la tua mail e te li spedisco in pdf

    Positive emotional expectations predict volunteer outcomes for new volunteers.
    By: Barraza, Jorge. Motivation & Emotion. Jun2011, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p211-219. 9p. Abstract: Emotional expectations are likely to influence behavioral outcomes, even when entering novel situations. In the present study, it was proposed that positive emotional expectations would influence volunteer outcomes for new volunteers. New and experienced volunteers were recruited for a two-part longitudinal study. Study hypotheses were confirmed. The mere anticipation of positive emotions was able to predict volunteer outcomes for new volunteers. Emotional expectations (i.e., sympathy, satisfaction) were positively associated with intentions to continue volunteering, identification with the volunteer role, and predicted volunteer persistence 6 months later for new volunteers. For experienced volunteers, emotional expectations were only significantly and positively associated with volunteer role identity. Moreover, the intent to persist as a volunteer was found to have a stronger positive association with actual persistence for experienced volunteers than for new volunteers. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1007/s11031-011-9210-4. (AN: 60529276)

    COGNITIVE AND EVOLUTIONARY FACTORS IN THE EMERGENCE OF HUMAN ALTRUISM.
    By: Van Slyke, James A. Zygon: Journal of Religion & Science. Dec2010, Vol. 45 Issue 4, p841-859. 19p. Abstract: One of the central tenets of Christian theology is the denial of self for the benefit of another. However, many views on the evolution of altruism presume that natural selection inevitably leads to a self-seeking human nature and that altruism is merely a façade to cover underlying selfish motives. I argue that human altruism is an emergent characteristic that cannot be reduced to any one particular evolutionary explanation. The evolutionary processes at work in the formation of human nature are not necessarily in conflict with the possibility of altruism; rather, aspects of human nature are uniquely directed toward the care and concern of others. The relationship between altruism, human nature, and evolution can be reimagined by adopting an emergent view of the hierarchy of science and a theological worldview that emphasizes self-renunciation. The investigation of altruism necessitates an approach that analyzes several aspects of altruistic behavior at different levels in the hierarchy of sciences. This research includes the study of evolutionary adaptations, neurological systems, cognitive functions, behavioral traits, and cultural influences. No one level is able to offer a full explanation, but each piece adds a unique dimension to a much larger puzzle. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9744.2010.01136.x. (AN: 55171146)

    Decision Under Ambiguity: Effects of Sign and Magnitude.
    By: INUKAI, KEIGO; TAKAHASHI, TAIKI. International Journal of Neuroscience. Aug2009, Vol. 119 Issue 8, p1170-1178. 9p. 6 Charts, 1 Graph. Abstract: Decision under ambiguity (uncertainty with unknown probabilities) has been attracting attention in behavioral and neuroeconomics. However, recent neuroimaging studies have mainly focused on gain domains while little attention has been paid to the magnitudes of outcomes. In this study, we examined the effects of the sign (i.e., gain and loss) and magnitude of outcomes on ambiguity aversion and the additivity of subjective probabilities in Ellsberg's urn problem. We observed that (i) ambiguity aversion was observed in both signs, and (ii) subadditivity of subjective probability was not observed in negative outcomes. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/00207450802174472. (AN: 43002698)

    Decision Making in Eating Behavior: Interacting Perspectives from the Individual, Family, and Environment: An Introduction.
    By: Rothman, Alexander J.; Gillespie, Ardyth H.; Johnson-Askew, Wendy L. Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2009 Supplement 1, Vol. 38, p1-3. 3p. Abstract: The article introduces several reports published within the issue including one on social cognitive factors regulating eating behavior, one on brain mechanisms and a neuroeconomic perspective on food decision making, and another on behaviors that underlie people's food choice decisions. DOI: 10.1007/s12160-009-9128-1. (AN: 45419973)

    Orbitofrontal Cortex Contributions to Food Selection and Decision Making.
    By: Zald, David H. Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2009 Supplement 1, Vol. 38, p18-24. 7p. 1 Color Photograph. Abstract: From a neuroeconomics perspective, decisions about what to eat are ultimately determined by basic features of how the brain codes and contrasts the values of different rewards and the potential positive or negative consequences of eating the food. Several brain regions play a role in this valuation and comparison process. Among these regions, the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), which occupies the ventral surface of the frontal lobe, plays a critical integrative role in these processes. An examination of the influences on valuation both within the OFC and in related brain regions reveals several features that are likely to impact food selection. These include coding of rewards relative to other available rewards, general and specific satiety, and temporal discounting. The OFC also processes information about negative valuations (i.e., cost, negative health consequences), which are influenced by factors such as temporal discounting, probability and ambiguity. An understanding of these influences on positive and negative valuation is critical in designing diets and public health programs aimed at promoting healthy eating. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1007/s12160-009-9117-4. (AN: 45419968)

    Neuroeconomics: Take your pick.
    By: Whalley, Katherine. Nature Reviews Neuroscience. May2009, Vol. 10 Issue 5, p315-315. 1p. 1 Color Photograph. Abstract: The article highlights two studies which examine the functional localization of brain through neural transmission. Both studies are designed to assess the functions of various parts of the brain implied in the neurobiological performance of value. These studies also explore other neural activities that involve in the representation of brain value and social context. DOI: 10.1038/nrn2642. (AN: 37820947)

    Neuroeconomics: Subliminal choices.
    Nature. 9/11/2008, Vol. 455 Issue 7210, p140-140. 1p. Abstract: The article highlights a study, conducted by a research team led by Mathias Pessiglione in Paris, France, that examined subliminal choices among humans. The researchers repeatedly showed 20 subjects abstract symbols as they played a gambling game. Based on the results in which the participants won more than they lost, the researchers concluded that their brains recognized the unperceived symbols and learned to associate them with punishment or reward. Furthermore, the findings of functional neuroimaging revealed that the mechanism involves the ventral striatum. DOI: 10.1038/455140a. (AN: 34235784)

    A current overview of consumer neuroscience.
    By: Hubert, Mirja; Kenning, Peter. Journal of Consumer Behaviour. Jul-Oct2008, Vol. 7 Issue 4/5, p272-292. 21p. Abstract: • The emerging discipline of neuroeconomics employs methods originally used in brain research for investigating economic problems, and furthers the advance of integrating neuroscientific findings into the economic sciences. Neuromarketing or consumer neuroscience is a sub-area of neuroeconomics that addresses marketing relevant problems with methods and insights from brain research. With the help of advanced techniques of neurology, which are applied in the field of consumer neuroscience, a more direct view into the "black box" of the organism should be feasible. Consumer neuroscience, still in its infancy, should not be seen as a challenge to traditional consumer research, but constitutes a complementing advancement for further investigation of specific decision-making behavior. • The key contribution of this paper is to suggest a distinct definition of consumer neuroscience as the scientific proceeding, and neuromarketing as the application of these findings within the scope of managerial practice. Furthermore, we aim to develop a foundational understanding of the field, moving away from the derisory assumption that consumer neuroscience is about locating the "buy button" in the brain. Against this background the goal of this paper is to present specific results of selected studies from this emerging discipline, classified according to traditional marketing-mix instruments such as product, price, communication, and distribution policies, as well as brand research. The paper is completed by an overview of the most prominent brain structures relevant for consumer neuroscience, and a discussion of possible implications of these insights for economic theory and practice. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/cb.251. (AN: 34074793)

    Reward, emotion and consumer choice: from neuroeconomics to neurophilosophy.
    By: Foxall, Gordon R. Journal of Consumer Behaviour. Jul-Oct2008, Vol. 7 Issue 4/5, p368-396. 29p. Abstract: Neuroeconomics has found no definitive role in the explanation of consumer choice and its undeveloped philosophical basis limits its attempt to explain economic behaviour. The nature of neuroeconomics is explored, especially with respect to what it reveals about the valuation of alternatives, choice and emotion. The tendency of human consumers to discount future rewards illustrates how behavioural and neuroscientific accounts of choice contribute to psychological explanations of choice and the issues this raises for both routine everyday choices and more extreme compulsions. Central to this is the phenomenon of matching in which consumers tend to select the immediately larger or largest reward and the neurophysiological and behavioural bases of this choice. Recognition that rewards are evoked by reinforcement contingencies and that the rewards themselves engender emotional responses via classical conditioning enhances understanding the contribution of neurological activity to the explanation of consumer behaviour. It is argued that neuroeconomics can play a vital explanatory role by providing an evolutionarily consistent warrant for the ascription of intentionality. The Behavioural Perspective Model is used as a template for investigations of consumer choice that lead to iterative theoretical development, forming the basis of a neurophilosophy in which neuroeconomics can find a decisive role. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/cb.258. (AN: 34074800)

    Evolutionary neuromarketing: Darwinizing the neuroimaging paradigm for consumer behavior.
    By: Garcia, Justin R.; Saad, Gad. Journal of Consumer Behaviour. Jul-Oct2008, Vol. 7 Issue 4/5, p397-414. 18p. Abstract: The current paper serves two purposes. First, it reviews the neuroimaging literature most relevant to the field of marketing (e.g., neuroeconomics, decision neuroscience, and neuromarketing). Second, it posits that evolutionary theory is a consilient and organizing meta-theoretical framework for neuromarketing research. The great majority of neuroimaging studies suffer from the illusion of explanatory depth namely the sophistication of the neuroimaging technologies provides a semblance of profundity to the reaped knowledge, which is otherwise largely disjointed and atheoretical. Evolutionary theory resolves this conundrum by recognizing that the human mind has evolved via the processes of natural and sexual selection. Hence, in order to provide a complete understanding of any given neuromarketing phenomenon requires that it be tackled at both the proximate level (as is currently the case) and the ultimate level (i.e., understanding the adaptive reason that would generate a particular neural activation pattern). Evolutionary psychology posits that the human mind consists of a set of domain-specific computational systems that have evolved to solve recurring adaptive problems. Accordingly, rather than viewing the human mind as a general-purpose domain-independent organ, evolutionary cognitive neuroscientists recognize that many neural activation patterns are instantiations of evolved computational systems in evolutionary relevant domains such as survival mating, kin selection, and reciprocity. As such, an evolutionary neuromarketing approach recognizes that the neural activation patterns associated with numerous marketing-related phenomena can be mapped onto the latter Darwinian modules thus providing a unifying meta-theory for this budding discipline. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/cb.259. (AN: 34074801)

    A framework for studying the neurobiology of value-based decision making.
    By: Rangel, Antonio; Camerer, Colin; Montague, P. Read. Nature Reviews Neuroscience. Jul2008, Vol. 9 Issue 7, p545-556. 12p. 2 Diagrams, 5 Charts. Abstract: Neuroeconomics is the study of the neurobiological and computational basis of value-based decision making. Its goal is to provide a biologically based account of human behaviour that can be applied in both the natural and the social sciences. This Review proposes a framework to investigate different aspects of the neurobiology of decision making. The framework allows us to bring together recent findings in the field, highlight some of the most important outstanding problems, define a common lexicon that bridges the different disciplines that inform neuroeconomics, and point the way to future applications. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1038/nrn2357. (AN: 32724003)


    Getting to the Heart of the Brain: Using Cognitive Neuroscience to Explore the Nature of Human Ability and Performance.
    By: Kalbfleisch, M. Layne. Roeper Review. Jul-Sep2008, Vol. 30 Issue 3, p162-170. 9p. 4 Color Photographs, 2 Charts, 1 Graph. Abstract: This article serves as a primer to make the neuroimaging literature more accessible to the lay reader and to increase the evaluative capability of the educated consumer of cognitive neuroscience. This special issue gives gifted education practitioners and researchers a primary source view of current neuroscience relevant to modern definitions and conceptions of giftedness while helping readers understand the methods of modern cognitive neuroscience. A second goal of this special issue is to increase readers' scientific literacy to generate a clearer understanding of both the utility and limitations of neuroimaging studies and a set of operating principles to employ when reading about neuroimaging studies from both primary and secondary sources. The potential for cognitive neuroscience to impact education has been an issue of high interest and rigorous debate, and international communities of educators and scientists have convened to explore potential intersections. Added to this, multiple and myriad definitions of giftedness make the exercise of exploring the nature of human ability and performance psychometrically and scientifically challenging. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/02783190802199321. (AN: 34194190)


    Risky business: the neuroeconomics of decision making under uncertainty.
    By: Platt, Michael L.; Huettel, Scott A. Nature Neuroscience. Apr2008, Vol. 11 Issue 4, p398-403. 6p. 1 Color Photograph, 1 Graph. Abstract: Many decisions involve uncertainty, or imperfect knowledge about how choices lead to outcomes. Colloquial notions of uncertainty, particularly when describing a decision as 'risky', often carry connotations of potential danger as well. Gambling on a long shot, whether a horse at the racetrack or a foreign oil company in a hedge fund, can have negative consequences, but the impact of uncertainty on decision making extends beyond gambling. Indeed, uncertainty in some form pervades nearly all our choices in daily life. Stepping into traffic to hail a cab, braving an ice storm to be the first at work, or dating the boss's son or daughter also offer potentially great windfalls, at the expense of surety. We continually face trade-offs between options that promise safety and others that offer an uncertain potential for jackpot or bust. When mechanisms for dealing with uncertain outcomes fail, as in mental disorders such as problem gambling or addiction, the results can be disastrous. Thus, understanding decision making—indeed, understanding behavior itself—requires knowing how the brain responds to and uses information about uncertainty. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1038/nn2062. (AN: 31428721)

    How to Play the Ultimatum Game: An Engineering Approach to Metanormativity.
    By: Hardy-Vallée, Benoit; Thagard, Paul. Philosophical Psychology. Apr2008, Vol. 21 Issue 2, p173-192. 20p. Abstract: The ultimatum game is a simple bargaining situation where the behavior of people frequently contradicts the optimal strategy according to classical game theory. Thus, according to many scholars, the commonly observed behavior should be considered irrational. We argue that this putative irrationality stems from a wrong conception of metanormativity (the study of norms about the establishment of norms). After discussing different metanormative conceptions, we defend a Quinean, naturalistic approach to the evaluation of norms. After reviewing empirical literature on the ultimatum game, we argue that the common behavior in the ultimatum game is rational and justified. We therefore suggest that the norms of economic rationality should be amended. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/09515080801976581. (AN: 31657030)


    Pubblicazione accademica
    Calculating utility: preclinical evidence for cost–benefit analysis by mesolimbic dopamine.
    By: Phillips, Paul E. M.; Walton, Mark E.; Jhou, Thomas C. Psychopharmacology. Apr2007, Vol. 191 Issue 3, p483-495. 13p. 2 Graphs. Abstract: Throughout our lives we constantly assess the costs and benefits of the possible future outcomes of our actions and use this information to guide behavior. There is accumulating evidence that dopamine contributes to a fundamental component of this computation—how rewards are compared with the costs incurred when obtaining them. We review the evidence for dopamine’s role in cost–benefit decision making and outline a simple mathematical framework in which to represent the interactions between rewards, costs, behavioral state and dopamine. Dopamine’s effects on cost–benefit decision making can be modeled using simple utility–function curves. This approach provides a useful framework for modeling existing data and generating experimental hypotheses that can be objectively and quantitatively tested by observing choice behavior without the necessity to account for subjective psychological states such as pleasure or desire. We suggest that dopamine plays a key role in overcoming response costs and enabling high-effort behaviors. A particularly important anatomical site of this action is the core of the nucleus accumbens. Here, dopamine is able to modulate activity originating from the frontal cortical systems that also assess costs and rewards. Internal deprivation states (e.g., hunger and thirst) also help to energize goal-seeking behaviors, probably in part by their rich influence on dopamine, which can in turn modify decision making policies. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1007/s00213-006-0626-6. (AN: 24241070)

    The neurobiology of punishment.
    By: Seymour, Ben; Singer, Tania; Dolan, Ray. Nature Reviews Neuroscience. Apr2007, Vol. 8 Issue 4, p300-312. 13p. Abstract: Animals, in particular humans, frequently punish other individuals who behave negatively or uncooperatively towards them. In animals, this usually serves to protect the personal interests of the individual concerned, and its kin. However, humans also punish altruistically, in which the act of punishing is personally costly. The propensity to do so has been proposed to reflect the cultural acquisition of norms of behaviour, which incorporates the desire to uphold equity and fairness, and promotes cooperation. Here, we review the proximate neurobiological basis of punishment, considering the motivational processes that underlie punishing actions. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1038/nrn2119. (AN: 24411239)

    DEVELOPMENT OF THE EXECUTIVE PERSONAL FINANCE SCALE.
    By: Spinella, Marcello; Yang, Bijou; Lester, David. International Journal of Neuroscience. Mar2007, Vol. 117 Issue 3, p301-313. 13p. 5 Charts. Abstract: There is accumulating evidence that prefrontal systems play an important role in management of personal finances, based on studies using clinical populations, functional neuroimaging, and both subjective and objective neuropsychological measures. This study developed the Executive Personal Finance Scale (EPFS) as a specific self-rating measure of executive aspects of personal money management. The resulting 20-item scale had good reliability and showed four factors: impulse control, organization, planning, and motivational drive. Validity was evidenced by correlations with income, credit card debt, and investments. The EPFS also showed logical correlations with compulsive buying and money attitudes. Second-order factor analysis of the EPFS and other scales revealed two higher-order factors of personal finance: cognitive (e.g., planning, organizing) and emotional (e.g., anxiety, impulse-spending, prestige). The EPFS shows good psychometric properties, is easy to use, and will make a convenient complement to other research methodologies exploring the neural basis of personal finance management. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/00207450500534043. (AN: 24154741)

    Altruism is associated with an increased neural response to agency.
    By: Tankersley, Dharol; Stowe, C. Jill; Huettel, Scott A. Nature Neuroscience. Feb2007, Vol. 10 Issue 2, p150-151. 2p. 2 Graphs. Abstract: Although the neural mechanisms underlying altruism remain unknown, empathy and its component abilities, such as the perception of the actions and intentions of others, have been proposed as key contributors. Tasks requiring the perception of agency activate the posterior superior temporal cortex (pSTC), particularly in the right hemisphere. Here, we demonstrate that differential activation of the human pSTC during action perception versus action performance predicts self-reported altruism. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1038/nn1833. (AN: 23839684)

    The Role of Emotion in Decision Making: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective.
    By: Naqvi, Nasir; Shiv, Baba; Bechara, Antoine. Current Directions in Psychological Science (Wiley-Blackwell). Oct2006, Vol. 15 Issue 5, p260-264. 5p. 1 Diagram. Abstract: Decision making often occurs in the face of uncertainty about whether one's choices will lead to benefit or harm. The somatic-marker hypothesis is a neurobiological theory of how decisions are made in the face of uncertain outcome. This theory holds that such decisions are aided by emotions, in the form of bodily states, that are elicited during the deliberation of future consequences and that mark different options for behavior as being advantageous or disadvantageous. This process involves an interplay between neural systems that elicit emotional/bodily states and neural systems that map these emotional/bodily states. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8721.2006.00448.x. (AN: 23162383)

    Driven to market.
    By: Lehrer, Jonah. Nature. 10/5/2006, Vol. 443 Issue 7111, p502-504. 3p. 1 Color Photograph, 1 Diagram. Abstract: The article talks of neuroeconomics, whereby, through parlour games with brain scanners, money spending behavior is investigated. The gamers do not obey the principles of classical economics, and instead show behaviour that clearly demonstrate the negation of rational self-interest. According to Paul Glimcher, neuro economist at New York University, "Our emotions are are much more integrated not just negative impulses". Neuroscience provides us with new ways of testing economic predictions. DOI: 10.1038/443502a. (AN: 22569671)

    e altri ancora...

    Buona vita
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  4. #4
    L'avatar di Duccio
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    Riferimento: Tesi in neuroeconomy

    Ottimo grazie mille Willy ecco la mia mail duccio78@yahoo.it se altri avessero anche altri consigli.. mi pare ci sia diverse cose gia' qui.. dimenticavo che volevo inserire qualcosa anche sulle emozioni (cosa che vedo fra l'altro nella lista che ha scritto Willy) , pensavo come mi era stato suggerito all'errore di Cartesio di Damasio..
    Ultima modifica di Duccio : 04-10-2012 alle ore 23.19.28

  5. #5
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
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    Riferimento: Tesi in neuroeconomy

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da Duccio Visualizza messaggio
    Ottimo grazie mille Willy ecco la mia mail duccio78@yahoo.it se altri avessero anche altri consigli.. mi pare ci sia diverse cose gia' qui.. dimenticavo che volevo inserire qualcosa anche sulle emozioni (cosa che vedo fra l'altro nella lista che ha scritto Willy) , pensavo come mi era stato suggerito all'errore di Cartesio di Damasio..
    Articoli inviati. Spero tu abbia una casella di posta GRAANDE...

    Buona vita
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  6. #6

  7. #7
    L'avatar di Duccio
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    Riferimento: Tesi in neuroeconomy

    Willy ti ringrazio davvero tanto, ho aspettato a risponderti per scaricare tutto... tranquillo ho una casella pressoche' infinita... ho piu' di 15mila email al suo interno..
    Bene devo dire che il materiale sulle emozioni e' tantissimo e credo piu' che sufficiente per occupare almeno un capitolo della tesi, mi pareva giusto in una tesi di psicologia anche se di ambito piu' neuroscientifico inserire una parte sulle emozioni.
    Per quanto riguarda la neuroeconomy in senso stretto sia dagli articoli che mi hai inviato che da una ricercha fatta sia su google scholar e pubmed che gli autori di riferimento grosso modo siano gli stessi.
    Queste tesi che mi hai linkato saranno sicuramente di aiuto ulteriore.
    Grazie ancora per la cortesia e disponibilita', non mi aspettavo tanto a dire il vero

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