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Visualizzazione risultati 1 fino 7 di 7
  1. #1
    Matricola
    Data registrazione
    31-08-2011
    Messaggi
    17

    psicologia della musica

    ciao, qualcuno ha materiale sulla psicologia della musica? in particolare sull'utilizzo della musica nella comunicazione con la disabilitÓ/diversitÓ? grazie

  2. #2
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: psicologia della musica

    'Pussy Cat, Pussy Cat, Where have you been?'An account of intensive psychotherapy with a seven-year-old boy in a special school.
    By: Robertson, Kate. Journal of Child Psychotherapy. Dec2008, Vol. 34 Issue 3, p319-334. 16p. Abstract: This paper gives an account of the developments in the intensive psychotherapy of a seven-year-old boy with global development delay. It also describes the adaptations to technique and the changes in the setting that were required to support the work, which was undertaken in a special school. The importance of the regularity of sessions in helping to establish object constancy; physical and mental boundaries in relation to me/not me; inside and outside is also explored. A central theme of the paper is how close observation can inform the understanding of the emotional states of disabled children, particularly those with little language. The paper draws links between the early communications of mothers and infants and the therapeutic relationship, with reference to music therapy. It describes banging as a form of communication and traces the development of banging into more coherent nursery rhymes arguing that this development is an internalisation of the rhythm of the therapy and of the growing understanding between the child and therapist. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/00754170802472877. (AN: 35113390)
    Argomenti: PSYCHOTHERAPY; CHILD development; COMMUNICATION; THERAPEUTICS; PSYCHIATRY; CLINICAL sociology
    Database: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection


    Using music to develop peer interaction: an examination of the response of two subjects with a learning disability.
    By: Hooper, Jeff. British Journal of Learning Disabilities. Dec2002, Vol. 30 Issue 4, p166. 5p. Abstract: The paper examines the response of two subjects who attended a programme of music activity therapy in which the music activities encouraged peer interaction. Music activity therapy was compared with a control condition (i.e. ball and target games). Both treatment conditions increased the level of positive interaction. The absence of negative interaction was also significant. The results affirmed the value of nonverbal interventions in encouraging interaction, and offered insights into the relationship between the two subjects. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] (AN: 8596725)
    Argomenti: LEARNING disabled persons; MUSIC therapy; PEER counseling in rehabilitation; GROUP psychotherapy
    Database: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection


    Music therapy with hospitalized infants-the art and science of communicative musicality.
    By: Malloch, Stephen; Shoemark, Helen; Črnčec, Rudi; Newnham, Carol; Paul, Campbell; Prior, Margot; Coward, Sean; Burnham, Denis. Infant Mental Health Journal. Jul/Aug2012, Vol. 33 Issue 4, p386-399. 14p. Abstract (English): Infants seek contingent, companionable interactions with others. Infants in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), while receiving care that optimizes their chances of survival, often do not have the kind of interactions that are optimal for their social development. Live music therapy (MT) with infants is an intervention that aims for contingent, social interaction between therapist and infant. This study, with a limited numbers of infants, examined the effectiveness of an MT intervention in the NICU at The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne. Two groups of late pre-term and full-term infants were recruited to the study; one was given MT and the other was not. A healthy group of infants not given MT served as an additional control. The effect of MT was indexed using two measures reflecting infant social engagement: the Neurobehavioral Assessment of the Preterm Infant (NAPI) and the Alarm Distress Baby Scale (ADBB). Results suggest that the MT intervention used at The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne supports infants' neurobehavioral development. In particular, hospitalized infants who received MT were better able to maintain self-regulation during social interaction with an adult, were less irritable and cried less, and were more positive in their response to adult handling, when compared with infants who did not receive the intervention. These are important prerequisites for social interaction and development. Further and larger scale research using MT with this population is indicated. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/imhj.21346. (AN: 77655940)
    Argomenti: MUSIC therapy; CHILD mental health; HOSPITAL care; INFANTS -- Health; KINGS & rulers -- Children; PREMATURE infants; NEUROBEHAVIORAL disorders -- Treatment; SOCIAL interaction
    Database: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection

    Effectiveness of group music intervention against agitated behavior in elderly persons with dementia.
    By: Lin, Yu; Chu, Hsin; Yang, Chyn-Yng; Chen, Chiung-Hua; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Chang, Hsiu-Ju; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Chou, Kuei-Ru. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. Jul2011, Vol. 26 Issue 7, p670-678. 9p. 4 Charts, 1 Graph. Abstract: Objectives: This study explored the effectiveness of group music intervention against agitated behavior in elderly persons with dementia. Methods: This was an experimental study using repeated measurements. Subjects were elderly persons who suffered from dementia and resided in nursing facilities. In total, 104 participants were recruited by permuted block randomization and of the 100 subjects who completed this study, 49 were in the experimental group and 51 were in the control group. The experimental group received a total of twelve 30-min group music intervention sessions, conducted twice a week for six consecutive weeks, while the control group participated in normal daily activities. In order to measure the effectiveness of the therapeutic sessions, assessments were conducted before the intervention, at the 6th and 12th group sessions, and at 1 month after cessation of the intervention. Longitudinal effects were analyzed by means of generalized estimating equations (GEEs). Results: After the group music therapy intervention, the experimental group showed better performance at the 6th and 12th sessions, and at 1 month after cessation of the intervention based on reductions in agitated behavior in general, physically non-aggressive behavior, verbally non-aggressive behavior, and physically aggressive behavior, while a reduction in verbally aggressive behavior was shown only at the 6th session. Conclusions: Group music intervention alleviated agitated behavior in elderly persons with dementia. We suggest that nursing facilities for demented elderly persons incorporate group music intervention in routine activities in order to enhance emotional relaxation, create inter-personal interactions, and reduce future agitated behaviors. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1002/gps.2580. (AN: 59989078)
    Argomenti: TAIWAN; AGITATION (Psychology) -- Treatment; ANALYSIS of variance; CHI-square test; DEMENTIA; MUSIC therapy; NURSING care facilities; SAMPLING (Statistics); T-test (Statistics); U-statistics; RANDOMIZED controlled trials; PRE-tests & post-tests; REPEATED measures design; OLD age
    Database: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection


    The practical implication of comparing how adults with and without intellectual disability respond to music.
    By: Hooper, Jeff; Wigram, Tony; Carson, Derek; Lindsay, Bill. British Journal of Learning Disabilities. Mar2011, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p22-28. 7p. 3 Charts. Abstract: Previous researchers who compared how people with, and without, an intellectual disability respond to music focused on musical aptitude, but not on arousal. This paper presents the background, methodology, and results of a study that selected fifteen different pieces of music, and compared the arousal response of adults with (n = 48), and without (n = 48), an intellectual disability. There was a very strong significant positive correlation (rho = 0.831, N = 15, P < 0.001, two-tailed), which the present authors believe implies that music, identified as sedative by individuals who do not have an intellectual disability, can be used appropriately in an intervention predicated for lowering the arousal levels of the intellectually disabled population. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-3156.2010.00611.x. (AN: 58058560)
    Argomenti: ANALYSIS of variance; AROUSAL (Physiology); PEOPLE with mental disabilities -- Psychology; MUSIC therapy; NONPARAMETRIC statistics; RELAXATION; SAMPLING (Statistics); STATISTICAL hypothesis testing; STATISTICS; DATA analysis
    Database: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection


    Communicating through caregiver singing during morning care situations in dementia care.
    By: Hammar, Lena Marmstňl; Emami, Azita; Engstr÷m, Gabriella; G÷tell, Eva. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences. Mar2011, Vol. 25 Issue 1, p160-168. 9p. 2 Charts. Abstract: Scand J Caring Sci; 2011; 25; 160-168 It is well known that persons with dementia (PWD) have problems expressing and interpreting communication, making interaction with others difficult. Interaction between PWD and their caregivers is crucial, and several strategies have been investigated to facilitate communication during caregiving. Music therapeutic caregiving (MTC) - when caregivers sing for or together with PWD during caregiving activities - has been shown to enhance communication for PWD, evoking more vitality and positive emotions. The aim of this study was to describe how PWD and their caregivers express verbal and nonverbal communication and make eye contact during the care activity 'getting dressed', during morning care situations without and with MTC. Findings revealed that during the situations without MTC, the caregivers led the dressing procedure with verbal instructions and body movements and seldom invited the PWD to communicate or participate in getting dressed. Patterns in responses to caregivers' instructions included both active and compliant responses and reactions that were resistant and aggressive, confused, and disruptive. In contrast to the 'ordinary' morning care situation, during MTC, the caregivers seemed interested in communicating with the PWD and solicited their mutual engagement. Although verbal communication consisted of singing about things other than getting dressed, e.g. dancing, love, sailing, God, the PWD mostly responded to caregivers in a composed manner, by being active, compliant, and relaxed, though some were also resistant or incongruent. The authors conclude that MTC could be a way for PWD and their caregivers to successfully interact and co-operate during caring situations, as it seems to evoke enhanced communication for both partners in this context. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2010.00806.x. (AN: 58094579)
    Argomenti: SWEDEN; COMMUNICATION -- Methodology; SINGING -- Psychological aspects; DEMENTIA -- Psychological aspects; CARING; CONTENT analysis (Communication); MEDICAL personnel & patient; MUSIC therapy; NONVERBAL communication; NURSING care facilities -- Employees; RESEARCH -- Finance; QUALITATIVE research; EMPIRICAL research
    Database: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection


    The effects of music therapy on reducing agitation in patients with Alzheimer's disease, a pre-post study.
    By: Zare, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Azizeh Afkham; Birashk, Behrooz. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. Dec2010, Vol. 25 Issue 12, p1309-1310. 2p. 1 Chart. Abstract: The article discusses research which was conducted to investigate the effect various types of music therapy had on reducing agitation in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Researchers evaluated 26 patients in four different nursing homes. They found that music therapy does have positive effects on reducing agitation in patients with Alzheimer's disease and that when used daily it may reduce intrusive behaviors in the patients. DOI: 10.1002/gps.2450. (AN: 55255571)
    Argomenti: ALZHEIMER'S disease -- Treatment; NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL tests; MUSIC therapy; NURSING care facilities; SCALE analysis (Psychology); T-test (Statistics); AGITATION (Psychology); PRE-tests & post-tests; PREVENTION
    Database: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection


    A randomized controlled trial exploring the effect of music on agitated behaviours and anxiety in older people with dementia.
    By: Cooke, Marie L.; Moyle, Wendy; Shum, David H. K.; Harrison, Scott D.; Murfield, Jenny E. Aging & Mental Health. Nov2010, Vol. 14 Issue 8, p905-916. 12p. 2 Diagrams, 3 Charts. Abstract: Objectives: This study, as part of a larger programme of research, sought to investigate the effect that participation in a 40-min live group music programme, involving facilitated engagement with song-singing and listening, three times a week for eight weeks, had on agitation and anxiety in older people with dementia. Methods: A randomized cross-over design, with music and reading control groups, was employed. Forty-seven participants with mild - moderate dementia, from two aged care facilities in Queensland, Australia, were recruited. Participants were assessed three times on the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory - Short Form (CMAI-SF) and the Rating Anxiety in Dementia Scale (RAID). Results: A sub-analysis of 24 participants attending ≥50% of music sessions found a significant increase in the frequency of verbal aggression over time, regardless of group (F(2,46) = 3.534, p < 0.05). A series of multiple regressions found cognitive impairment, length of time living in the facility and gender to be predictors of agitation overall and by subtype. Conclusion: Participation in the music programme did not significantly affect agitation and anxiety in older people with dementia. Both the music and reading group activities, however, gave some participants a 'voice' and increased their verbalization behaviour. Agitation was found to be predicted by a number of background factors (namely level of cognitive impairment, length of time in the facility and gender). Future studies would benefit more from in-depth participant assessment prior to study commencement, helping to moderate the influence of low scores, and by undertaking interventions at times when assessed symptoms are most prevalent. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1080/13607861003713190. (AN: 55116279)
    Argomenti: DEMENTIA -- Patients; MUSIC therapy; OLDER patients; MUSIC -- Psychological aspects; GEROPSYCHOLOGY; ANXIETY in old age; AGITATION (Psychology)
    Database: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection


    The Effects of Improvisational Music Therapy on Joint Attention Behaviors in Autistic Children: A Randomized Controlled Study.
    By: Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian. Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders. Oct2008, Vol. 38 Issue 9, p1758-1766. 9p. 2 Charts, 4 Graphs. Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviors in pre-school children with autism. It was a randomized controlled study employing a single subject comparison design in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy and play sessions with toys, and using standardized tools and DVD analysis of sessions to evaluate behavioral changes in children with autism. The overall results indicated that improvisational music therapy was more effective at facilitating joint attention behaviors and non-verbal social communication skills in children than play. Session analysis showed significantly more and lengthier events of eye contact and turn-taking in improvisational music therapy than play sessions. The implications of these findings are discussed further. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] DOI: 10.1007/s10803-008-0566-6. (AN: 34614599)
    Argomenti: MUSIC therapy; AUTISM in children; CLINICAL trials; CHILDREN -- Diseases -- Treatment; INTERPERSONAL communication; INTERPERSONAL relations
    Database: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection


    Per ora, questi

    Buona vita
    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n░ 10126

  3. #3
    Matricola
    Data registrazione
    31-08-2011
    Messaggi
    17

    Riferimento: psicologia della musica

    grazie mille!!

  4. #4
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: psicologia della musica

    Ciao

    Vedo che, col tempo, i link non sono pi¨ attivi. Se mi mandi per PM un tuo indirizzo mail, ti invio per posta elettronica tutto quel che riesco a trovare.

    Buona vita
    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n░ 10126

  5. #5
    Matricola
    Data registrazione
    31-08-2011
    Messaggi
    17

    Riferimento: psicologia della musica

    ok, grazie! scrivo in privato!

  6. #6
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
    Residenza
    Albino (BG)
    Messaggi
    4,192
    Blog Entries
    281

    Riferimento: psicologia della musica

    Articoli inviati. Se serve altro, chiedi.

    Buona vita
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n░ 10126

  7. #7
    Matricola
    Data registrazione
    31-08-2011
    Messaggi
    17

    Riferimento: psicologia della musica

    non so proprio come ringraziarla!!

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