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Discussione: Psicologia del Gusto!

  1. #1

    Psicologia del Gusto!

    cerco materiale sulla psicologia del gusto, intesa sul cibo, quello che può suscitare il cibo mentre lo si mangia e la relativa rappresentazione grafica! so che è strano come studio....ma help me!

  2. #2
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
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    Albino (BG)
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    4,192
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    Riferimento: Psicologia del Gusto!

    Academic Journal

    Assessing yourself as an emotional eater: Mission impossible?
    Evers, Catharine; de Ridder, Denise T. D.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; Health Psychology, Vol 28(6), Nov, 2009. pp. 717-725. [Journal Article] Abstract: Objective: The extent to which individuals are emotional eaters has typically been assessed by people’s self-reported desire to eat when they experience negative emotions. Elevated scores on these emotional eater scales have been associated with eating pathology and obesity. However, evidence that individuals scoring high on these scales truly increase their food intake during emotional encounters is inconclusive. The current studies tested whether emotional eater scales capture the proposed tendency to eat when feeling emotional. Design: In four experiments with different emotion induction procedures, female participants were randomly assigned to negative emotion or control conditions. In the control conditions positive or no emotions were induced. Next, food consumption was assessed by bogus taste tests. Main Outcome Measures: Emotional eater status, emotional experience, and actual consumption of different food types. Results: Individuals describing themselves as emotional eaters did not increase food intake during emotional encounters as compared to control conditions or individuals not judging themselves as emotional eaters. Conclusion: The results suggest that self-reported emotional eaters do not increase food intake during emotional encounters in the laboratory. Implications of these findings are discussed, including the idea that it may be complex to adequately assess one’s own emotional eating behavior. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)

    Impairments in the perception of odor-induced tastes and their relationship to impairments in taste perception.
    Stevenson, Richard J.; Miller, Laurie A.; Thayer, Zoe C.; Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Vol 34(5), Oct, 2008. pp. 1183-1197. [Journal Article] Abstract: Certain odors have tastelike qualities when sniffed. To the extent that these qualities are akin to real taste experiences, impairment in perception of odor-induced tastes should be accompanied by taste impairment, and vice versa. Twelve patients were selected with possible odor-induced taste impairments or general taste impairments via a screening test, along with a further 6 patients with a probable taste impairment (insular lesion). These 18 patients, along with 19 normal controls, completed a battery of odor, taste, visual control, and neuropsychological tests to assess impairments in odor-induced taste perception and general taste perception. Four patients had an odor-induced taste impairment and were also impaired on taste perception. A further analysis, using regression on the whole sample, indicated that taste impairments were associated with odor-induced taste abnormalities independent of other predictors. This pattern also held for the patient group alone. The insular patients also exhibited both taste and odor-induced taste impairments. This study is the first to demonstrate a relationship between impaired taste perception and the perception of odor-induced tastes and suggests that both may rely on certain common neural substrates. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)

    Match and mismatch of taste, odor, and color is reflected by electrical activity in the human brain.
    Skrandies, Wolfgang; Reuther, Nicole; Journal of Psychophysiology, Vol 22(4), 2008. pp. 175-184. [Journal Article] Abstract: We aimed at elucidating the relationship between odor, taste, color, and food stimuli where subjects were studied either with questionnaires or in electrophysiological experiments. First, a total of 144 word pairs were rated by 660 subjects who determined whether the first stimulus (odor or taste word) matched the second one (color or food word). In an electrophysiological experiment, EEG was recorded from 30 electrodes in 24 healthy adults while clearly matching, or nonmatching, word pairs were presented on a monitor. Evoked potentials were computed for different stimulus classes (matching or nonmatching combinations of odor or taste and color or food words). Six components were identified and compared between conditions. For most components, field strength (GFP) was lower for nonmatching than for matching word pairs. In addition to late effects, electrical brain activity was influenced by experimental conditions as early as at 100 ms latency. Most effects observed were in the time range between 100 and 250 ms. Our data show how color and food words are differently affected when paired with odor or taste words. Complex interactions between stimulus modality (taste/odor) and different target words (color/food) occurred depending on whether the pairs were seen by the subjects as appropriate or inappropriate. Topographical effects indicated that different neural populations were activated in different conditions. Most interestingly, there were many cognitive effects occurring quite early (on the order of 100 ms) after stimulus presentation, and our results suggest rapid cognitive processing of information on odor, taste, color, and food items. This is an important prerequisite for the preconscious and fast choice of food items in everyday behavior, and the data confirm earlier findings on rapid and preconscious semantic processing in the visual cortex. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)

    Olfactory-induced synesthesias: A review and model.
    Stevenson, Richard J.; Tomiczek, Caroline; Psychological Bulletin, Vol 133(2), Mar, 2007. pp. 294-309. [Journal Article] Abstract: Recent reviews of synesthesia concentrate upon rare neurodevelopmental examples and exclude common olfactory-induced experiences with which they may profitably be compared. Like the neurodevelopmental synesthesias, odor-induced experiences involve different sensory modalities; are reliable, asymmetric (concurrents cannot induce), and automatic; and the inducer-concurrent relationship is learnt. Unlike neurodevelopmental synesthesias, these experiences are universal and their synesthetic nature goes unrecognized. Olfaction's ability to universally induce concurrents may result from its unique neuroanatomy, affording dual access to neocortex. We propose that concurrents arise here via a twofold process: by direct neocortical activation, which recovers a configural memory, and by attribution of this memory to the olfactory modality by thalamic attentional processes. The implications of this for other forms of synesthesia are then examined. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)

    Hunger alters the expression of acquired hedonic but not sensory qualities of food-paired odors in humans.
    Yeomans, Martin R.; Mobini, Sirous; Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, Vol 32(4), Oct, 2006. pp. 460-466. [Journal Article] Abstract: To test whether expression of hedonic and sensory odor qualities acquired by association with sweet and bitter tastes depend on hunger state, hungry volunteers experienced odors paired with sucrose, quinine, or water and then were tested under different hunger states manipulated with energy preloads. Acquired liking for sucrose-paired odors was evident following a low-energy or control preload but not a high-energy preload; however, odor sweetness increased in all preload conditions. Acquired dislike and increased bitterness of quinine-paired odors were independent of preloading. These data demonstrate hunger-dependent expression of acquired liking for flavors through flavor-flavor associations in humans and demonstrate independence between acquired hedonic and sensory qualities of odors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)

    Hedonic and sensory characteristics of odors conditioned by pairing with tastants in humans.
    Yeomans, Martin R.; Mobini, Sirous; Elliman, Toby D.; Walker, Helen C.; Stevenson, Richard J.; Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, Vol 32(3), Jul, 2006. pp. 215-228. [Journal Article] Abstract: Animals readily acquire positive odor-taste hedonic associations, but evidence for this in humans remains weak and was explored further. Retronasal pairing of odors with sucrose or salty stimuli (Experiment 1) increased the rated sweetness of sucrose-paired odors without altering liking, although changes in odor pleasantness correlated with sucrose liking. Experience of odors with sucrose or quinine by sweet likers (Experiment 2) found increased pleasantness and sweetness for sucrose-paired odors, whereas quinine-paired odors became less liked and more bitter. Odor-sucrose pairings in sweet likers and dislikers (Experiment 3) found increased sweetness in both groups but increased odor liking only in likers. These data suggest that evaluative and sensory learning are dissociable and that evaluative changes are sensitive to individual differences in sweet liking. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)

    Taste and olfactory intensity perception changes following left insular stroke.
    Mak, Y. Erica; Simmons, Katharine B.; Gitelman, Darren R.; Small, Dana M.; Behavioral Neuroscience, Vol 119(6), Dec, 2005. pp. 1693-1700. [Journal Article] Abstract: The authors tested suprathreshold intensity perception of gustatory and olfactory stimuli in a 70-year-old right-handed man following a left posterior insular stroke and compared his results with those of age-matched controls. Both modalities revealed significant differences between left (ipsilateral to lesion) and right (contralateral) ratings of intensity. In both gustation and olfaction, these differences were driven primarily by trends toward increased contralateral sensitivity relative to controls. Intensity changes were most pronounced for unpleasant odors and for tastes perceived strongly as either pleasant (sweet) or unpleasant (salty, bitter). These results show that a left posterior insula lesion may affect taste and olfactory perception similarly by increasing sensitivity contralateral to the lesion. One possible mechanism is release from inhibition at the cortical level. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)

    Psychophysical Isolation of the Modality Responsible for Detecting Multimodal Stimuli: A Chemosensory Example.
    Nagata, Hisanori; Dalton, Pamela; Doolittle, Nadine; Breslin, Paul A. S.; Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Vol 31(1), Feb, 2005. pp. 101-109. [Journal Article] Abstract: Multiple sense modalities can be stimulated conjointly by a physically complex item, such as a predator, and also by a physically solitary stimulus that acts on multiple receptor classes. As a prime example of this latter group, l-menthol from mint stimulates taste, smell, and several somatosensory submodalities. In 6 experiments that used a variety of psychometric techniques, the authors experimentally isolated the modality by which l-menthol is detected in the upper airways (the nose and mouth). Interestingly, absolute detection in both the nasal and oral cavities was based on olfaction and not stinging, cooling, or taste. These experiments illustrate how the sensory modality responsible for detecting a multimodal or multisensory stimulus can be psychophysically isolated. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)

    Hindsight bias in gustatory judgments.
    Pohl, Rüdiger F.; Schwarz, Stefan; Sczesny, Sabine; Stahlberg, Dagmar; Experimental Psychology, Vol 50(2), 2003. pp. 107-115. [Journal Article] Abstract: Being in hindsight, people tend to overestimate what they had known in foresight. This phenomenon has been studied for a wide variety of knowledge domains (e.g., episodes with uncertain outcomes, or solutions to almanac questions). As a result of these studies, hindsight bias turned out to be a robust phenomenon. In this paper, we present two experiments that successfully extended the domain of hindsight bias to gustatory judgments. Participants tasted different food items and were asked to estimate the quantity of a certain ingredient, for example, the residual sugar in a white wine. Judgments in both experiments were systematically biased towards previously presented low or high values that were labeled as the true quantities. Thus, hindsight bias can be considered a phenomenon that extends well beyond the judgment domains studied so far. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)

    Ne ho sottomano un altro centinaio. Se mi mandi la tua mail per PM te li spedisco

    Buona vita
    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  3. #3
    Partecipante Assiduo L'avatar di lailetta77
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    Riferimento: Psicologia del Gusto!

    Anche io cerco del materiale, mi potreste aiutare?

  4. #4
    Postatore OGM L'avatar di willy61
    Data registrazione
    20-09-2004
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    Riferimento: Psicologia del Gusto!

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da lailetta77 Visualizza messaggio
    Anche io cerco del materiale, mi potreste aiutare?

    Che tipo di materiale? Su quale argomento? Se lo trovo, come te lo mando?

    Buona vita
    Guglielmo
    Dott. Guglielmo Rottigni
    Ordine Psicologi Lombardia n° 10126

  5. #5
    Partecipante
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    17-03-2008
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    Riferimento: Psicologia del Gusto!

    ciao ANTARES86 ce la faremo..................

  6. #6
    Neofita
    Data registrazione
    23-07-2009
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    chieti
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    Riferimento: Psicologia del Gusto!

    Citazione Originalmente inviato da willy61 Visualizza messaggio
    Che tipo di materiale? Su quale argomento? Se lo trovo, come te lo mando?

    Buona vita
    Guglielmo
    Buon girono! ...ma quanlche articolo in italiano sulla psicologia del gusto? Grazie

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